Genoa restaurant to open seasonally with new menu | NevadaAppeal.com

Genoa restaurant to open seasonally with new menu

Genoa's Cottonwood Cottage is opening for the spring, summer and fall seasons starting on Friday, in time for the annual Cowboy Festival.

The restaurant and bar, which hosts a bevy of events from weddings to family reunions, also announced new menu items and new hours of operation.

Previously closed for the winter "shoulder season," Cottonwood Cottage will open with a new soft serve ice cream machine for cones, sundaes, floats and specialty cocktails, and other menu items including fries, garlic fries and Tater Tots.

The new food items round out an existing menu of personal pizzas, burgers, grilled sandwiches, and salads.

Also new at Cottonwood Cottage is the 1947 Jeep Willys "welcome wagon" named Mojo, which is perched at the top of the parking lot and ready to greet guests.

Finally, new hours of operation for the remainder of spring are Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Beginning June 1 and through summer, the eatery also will be open Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

"Between the fantastic ski season and the work we've been doing on the property and menu planning, it's been a very busy winter," said Brent Knittel, co-owner of Cottonwood Cottage. "We are excited for the re-opening so we can share the new things we've been working on — all of which contribute to enjoyable experiences for all of our guests."

Cottonwood Cottage, at 202 Genoa Lane, offers casual dining with a spacious backyard and activities for the whole family, including bocce ball, corn hole, ladder ball, and horseshoes. The restaurant and bar gets its name from the cottonwood trees that adorn the property and whose leaves left indelible prints on the concrete floors. The bar, aptly named Cottonwood Spirits, features reclaimed barn wood that punctuates the rustic look and feel of the more than 125-year-old property.

The building has a long history starting in the mid 1800s when it was a chicken coop and hay barn of Stephen Kinsey, one of the earliest settlers of Genoa. Within the past quarter century, the building has served as a restaurant and bar; most recently the Tombstone Tap & Grill, and previous to Tombstone, the Old Inn Cognito.

For information, go to http://www.cottonwoodgenoa.com.

Art galleries in Carson City area invited to think bigger

When Robin McGregor attended her first Entrepreneurs Assembly meeting at the Adams Hub for Innovation in February, she had no idea what to expect. Her goal was to drive more people into Carson City Art Gallery, which she opened in September with her husband, Rich. The gallery opened in a historic former stagecoach stop at 110 Curry St. in downtown Carson City.

The confidential Entrepreneurs Assembly sessions are designed to help businesses think out, plan, start, or grow a company.

Each attendee brings their unique problem to the table, and through interaction with mentors and other business owners receive guidance and advice. Participants then formulate their own marching orders for the next 30 days.

McGregor's marching orders? Her mentor group suggested she start a thinktank for art galleries that represent local artists. Her goal is to make it easier for consumers to identify these artists as they seek to support small businesses.

"We're committed to representing local talent, and we want to find new ways to get the local market to embrace collecting original art as part of their lifestyle," said McGregor. "We've had such a warm welcome from Carson City, and we're excited about the potential for growth."

The new Local Art Support & Sales (LASS) will address marketing art in the region and challenges specific to operating independent galleries.

There will be an opportunity to collaborate on cooperative marketing projects as well. The new Gallery on Main from Genoa has already committed to participation.

"We're thrilled that there will be a community of like-minded businesses that we can join as we open our doors," said Carrie Hardison, Gallery on Main owner.

Qualified businesses are invited to join McGregor at 1 p.m. May 8 at the Adams Hub for Innovation, 111 W. Proctor St.

RSVP by emailing carsoncityart@yahoo.com or calling 775-313-8628 or going to http://www.facebook.com/carsoncityartgallery.

Carson City area live entertainment for April 27-May 3, 2017

The Trippin King Snakes from 7 to 10 p.m. today at the Carson Cigar Company, 318 N. Carson St.

Rustler's Heat at 7 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 W. Third St., Suite 8.

Mo'z Motley Blues Band at 7 p.m. Friday at the Ponderosa Saloon, 106 S. C St., Virginia City.

Ev Musselman from 9 to 11 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.; 5-9 p.m. Saturday at David Walley's Resort, 2001 Foothill Road, Genoa; and 6-9 p.m. Wednesday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Brian Lester from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Js' Old Town Bistro in Dayton.

Tully Green from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday at the Ponderosa Saloon, 106 S. C St., Virginia City.

The Rockaholics with CV-41 from 7 p.m. to midnight Saturday in the Eleventh Frame Lounge inside Carson Lanes, 4600 Snyder Ave.

Southbound Train from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Delta Saloon, 18 S. C St., Virginia City.

Steppen Stonz at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Prey for Son at 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Living the Good Life, 1480 N. Carson St.

Live comedy by Dan Gabriel at 8 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St. Tickets for $15 are at carsoncomedyclub.com or the casino's guest service center.

An open mic night open to all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Fast Forward at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

Deception from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday at the Carson's Nugget's Loft, 507 N. Carson St.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino today and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Karaoke at The Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St., from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday.

Tom Miller from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Corky Bennett from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at La Posada Real, 3205 Retail Drive.

Karaoke by J&M Productions from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

Patrick Major at 6 p.m. Sunday and Monday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Daniel Gaughan from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Genoa Lakes Golf Course & Resort, 1 Genoa Lakes Drive.

Jamie Rollins at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Dave Leather's acoustic Americana music at noon Wednesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St., and 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Billy Starr at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Red Dog Saloon, 76 N. C St. in Virginia City.

Send live music and entertainment information to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com by end of day Tuesday for inclusion.

‘Honky Tonk Highway’: Duane ‘Beans’ Sousa and Slade Rivers debuting country album

Duane "Beans" Sousa, a Carson City man known for his collaborations with country Hall of Famer Lacy J. Dalton, has a new crop of songs off an album he completed with Slade Rivers.

Sousa got his start as a guitarist and co-songwriter for Dalton from the start of her CBS Records career in Nashville.

He went on to produce Dalton's "Wild Horse Crossing" album and tour with her for 20 years in every state and five countries.

When not on tour, Sousa performed nightly from 1998 to 2006 at the now-closed Station Grille on South Carson Street.

His latest album, "Honky Tonk Highway," is the product of a collaboration with Rivers, a singer and songwriter from Jackson, Calif.

The duo met several years ago while fishing in the Carson River.

"Some old musician friends and I were playing music around the campfire when, after about 20 minutes or so of song sharing, this tall shadow of a cowboy appeared out of nowhere," Sousa said. "The stranger complimented our music and then asked, you mind if I go get my guitar and join you boys?"

"Sure," Sousa said. "You can join us — if you know any Merle Haggard songs."

Sousa said Rivers returned with a Martin acoustic guitar and played a horde of Haggard songs.

About a year later Sousa and Rivers found out they grew up just two miles apart from each other in the Bay Area in the 1950s and '60s.

Their newest collaboration plays off themes of travel, faith and family while nodding to the musicians who inspired them.

"Honky Tonk Highway comes from the music that inspired us, it was Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Kittie Wells and Patsy Cline, the music we grew up on," Sousa said. "These songs connect to the same theme of what Slade and I experienced being in music all this time."

Both musicians will perform at 6 p.m. Friday at the Wolf Creek Bar and Restaurant in Markleeville, Calif.

The performance will not only celebrate the release of the album, but also opening weekend of the California stream fishing season.

Additionally, look for the pair at the Genoa Americana Celebration on July 4.

"Honky Tonk Highway" can be downloaded for $9.99 at http://www.ShopRecords.com. In-person CDs at Friday's performance cost $15 each.

For information about Sousa and samples of his music, go to http://www.beanssousa.com.

Beer garden to open inside Carson City Nugget

The Carson Nugget is holding a celebration to mark the opening of its new beer garden today.

The new Beer Bar is a concept bar that offers only bottled beer from an open-to-the-casino cube complete with high-definition TVs.

The grand opening celebration will kick off with a beer toast at 6 p.m.

From 5 to 7 p.m., anyone playing max-play at the Beer Bar who hits a four-of-a-kind will receive two tickets to the Carson Comedy Club for a show of their choice.

The Beer Bar is just one of several improvements the casino is making over the next few months.

The Loft, an entertainment venue featuring live bands every weekend, opened at the beginning of the month and a redesigned bar is planned to open on the casino's west side in July.

Additionally, the comedy venue brings stand-up comedians into the area on Friday evenings.

To purchase comedy tickets, go to CarsonComedyClub.com. For information about events and venues, call 775-882-1626, or "like" the Nugget's Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/CarsonNugget.

High energy Ginkgoa performs at Barkley Theatre

Some seats are still available for the Ginkgoa show in the Barkley Theatre at the Oats Park Art Center tomorrow night. They are known for their lively, high-energy shows.

Their show here is part of an extensive North American tour. The French-American ensemble has played some of the world's most prestigious venues—including the Montreal Jazz Fest, Global Fest, the Kennedy Center and the Festival International de Louisiane.

Doors and the Art Center's bar will open at 7 p.m. and the show will begin at 8 p.m. Tickets are $17 for CAC members, $20 for nonmembers and you can pick yours up at Jeff's Copy Express on Maine Street or ITT @ NAS Fallon. You can also call Churchill Arts at 775-423-1440.

ERICKSON'S 'SHADOWBAHN'

Steve Erickson teaches at the University of California, Riverside and among his many awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award. He is the author of 10 novels—including "Tours of the Black Clock" and "These Dreams of You"—as well as two collections of non-fiction.

His latest novel is "Shadowbahn" (Blue Rider Press). The Twin Towers have suddenly re-appeared in the Badlands of South Dakota some twenty off years after they fell, as a kind of "American Stonehenge."

People are drawn by the hundreds, then by the thousands to the site. The towers appear to sing, but everyone hears a different tune. There's, perhaps, a mysterious figure, Jesse, on the 93rd floor who could be Elvis Presley's still-born brother.

A brother and sister—Parker and his adopted African sibling Zema—head out from L.A. to visit their mother somewhere in Michigan. Along the way, Zema discovers she has the uncanny ability to function as a speaker playing their father's long-lost mixtapes.

Erickson successfully blends a variety of landscapes, the twins of a hostile and divided populace (there's the Union and the Disunion) and the fractured backdrop of the history of the American songscape, from John Coltrane and John Lennon to Ray Charles and Laurie Anderson. During the course of their voyage along a detour/road that doesn't exist, the siblings discover there is no music anywhere anymore, except for what Zema plays.

Add to the mix a JFK who did not win the presidency and appears in a wheelchair to confront Jesse along with Warhol's Factory Crew including Valerie Solanas just before she shoots Andy, and set them against a series of sidebars dealing with songs well-known and over-looked, and we've only just begun.

The novel is a provocative and thought provoking assaying of our divided country, of counter-histories, what was, what is, what might be, the shadows of the other lives, the other paths that led us to the fractured and disintegrating spheres we think we know.

Kirk Robertson covers the arts and may be reached at news@lahontanvalleynews.com

Real story of Earp Brothers in Nevada

If one believed all the legends regarding Old West lawmen Wyatt and Virgil Earp in Nevada, he or she might think the pair personally tamed the wild and wooly mining towns of Tonopah and Goldfield and fought every outlaw in the state.

The reality, however, is that the Earps played a fairly minor role in the history and development of the twin Central Nevada communities and only one, Virgil, was ever involved in law enforcement in Nevada.

In January 1902, Wyatt Earp, fresh from Alaska's mining boom, arrived in Tonopah with his wife, Josie. Within a few months, he and a partner had opened the Northern Saloon and Earp was working for the Tonopah Mining Company hauling ore and supplies.

For a very short time, he apparently worked as an appointed deputy U.S. Marshal in Tonopah, mostly serving papers to defendants in federal court cases—but never engaged with any shootouts with desperados.

In the late summer of 1903, the restless Earp and his wife decided to leave Tonopah. He sold his investments and headed to Los Angeles to live. The two, however, returned several times to prospect around Silver Peak and other parts of Esmeralda County.

And that's about it for Wyatt Earp in Nevada.

As for Virgil Earp, Wyatt's older brother, he and his wife, Allie, arrived in Goldfield sometime in the latter part of 1904. Down on his luck and nearly broke, he took a job as deputy sheriff of Esmeralda County and also provided security at the National Club.

Sadly, a few months after settling in Goldfield, Virgil Earp contracted a bad case of pneumonia, which he was unable to shake. On October 19, 1905, Virgil Earp died in Goldfield at age 62. At the request of his daughter, his remains were sent to Portland, Oregon and he was buried at the Riverview Cemetery.

It is believed that Wyatt and Josie Earp may have visited Virgil and Allie in Goldfield sometime during the summer of 1904, but there is no official record of such a visit.

Nevada State Archivist Guy Louis Rocha, who has co-authored a book on the Earp brothers in Nevada, has written: "As for Wyatt Earp, there is no end to the list of things he didn't do in Goldfield. He didn't tend bar there, he didn't own a hotel or saloon there, and in fact he didn't do much of anything there."

In total, the two Earp brothers spent about eight and 11 months, respectively, in Nevada — hardly enough time to accomplish everything that has been attributed to them.

Still, the apocryphal stories about Wyatt Earp in Tonopah make for fun reading. For instance, one of the most often repeated stories involves him coming to the rescue of Tonopah attorney Tasker Oddie, who later served as Nevada's Governor and U.S. Senator.

In the tale, claim jumpers were digging a shaft on land owned by Oddie's clients. In order to stop the men from continuing, the unarmed Oddie jumped into the hole. The men allegedly pulled their guns on Oddie and ordered him to leave.

At that moment, Wyatt Earp and his saloon partner, Al Martin, came along in a wagon. The famous former lawman, who sometimes worked for Oddie, quickly sized up the situation and jumped into the hole beside his friend.

When the claim jumpers asked who he thought he was, Earp reportedly said, "I'm Wyatt Earp," then pointed at Martin, who had a shotgun aimed at the mine thieves. The men lowered their guns and quickly scrambled out of the hole, but not before following Earp's orders to replace the mine location stakes they'd knocked over.

The great Nevada mythmakers, Lucius Beebe and Charles Clegg, wrote about a remarkably similar episode occurring on a train ride. Allegedly, union thugs decided to shoot Oddie, who worked for the mining companies.

"A walrus mustached individual in a slouch hat and neat dark suit who was lounging in the smoking room overheard two characters in an adjacent compartment planning to shoot Oddie through the partition as soon as the train got under way," Beebe and Clegg wrote.

"Unceremoniously, he kicked open the door of their bedroom and told them the project was ill-advised and they had better leave the train while the going was good. To their inquiry as to just who the hell he thought he was, the answer was simply, 'Wyatt Earp.' The assassins left."

To find out what really is known about the Earps in Nevada, pick up a copy of "The Earps' Las Frontier," by Jeffrey M. Kintop and Guy Louis Rocha or read "Wyatt Earp: Law, Order, and a Game of Chance," which appeared in the March/April 2016 issue of Nevada Magazine.

Rich Moreno covers the places and people that make Nevada special.

Carson City area live entertainment for April 20-26, 2017

The RYE Brothers at 7 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 W. Third St., Suite 8.

Bob Gardner from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Friday at Js' Old Town Bistro in Dayton.

Elizabeth Tully from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Southbound Train from 9 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Ponderosa Saloon, 106 S. C St., Virginia City.

Brian Lester from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday at Js' Old Town Bistro in Dayton.

The Rebekah Chase Band at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Live comedy by David Gee at 8 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St. Tickets for $15 are at carsoncomedyclub.com or the casino's guest service center.

Ev Musselman from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.; and from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

An open mic night open to all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

First Take Rocks at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

Escalade from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday at the Carson's Nugget's Loft, 507 N. Carson St.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino today and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Karaoke at The Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St., from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday.

Tom Miller from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Corky Bennett from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at La Posada Real, 3205 Retail Drive.

Karaoke by J&M Productions from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

George Pickard at 6 p.m. Sunday and Monday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

CW and Dr. Spitmore at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Daniel Gaughan from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Genoa Lakes Golf Course & Resort, 1 Genoa Lakes Drive.

Dave Leather's acoustic Americana music at noon Wednesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St., and 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Billy Starr at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Red Dog Saloon, 76 N. C St. in Virginia City.

Chris Toomey at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Send live music and entertainment information to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com by end of day Tuesday for inclusion.

New York performer visiting Carson City for Earth Day event

Climate change is the subject of a one-woman show at the Brewery Arts Center this Earth Day weekend.

"Burning" is written and performed by Heather Harpham, a New York performer who has taught physical theater and improvisation at Sarah Lawrence College, SUNY Purchase, Muhlenberg College and The Neighborhood Playhouse and performed at the All For One Festival and The One Woman Standing Festival.

The BAC describes "Burning" as a semi-comic romp that "pings between Hurricane Sandy, our obsession with apocalyptic movies, NPR's narcoleptic effect, and the million trivial tasks that preoccupy us while Rome burns."

"Burning" will be performed in the Maize Harris Jesse Black Box Theater April 21 and 22 at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $15-20 and can be purchased at the BAC's Artisan Shop or offices at 449 West King St. or online at breweryarts.org or the BAC Facebook page.

For information, call the BAC at 775-883-1976.

Carson City Strings in the Schools putting on Spring Fling concert

Students from the Carson City Symphony's after-school music program will take center stage and play fiddle, folk and classical music today at the Carson City Community Center.

Ensembles from the Strings in the Schools program will present their annual Spring Fling concert at 6:30 p.m. today.

The free concert will feature performances by students from second grade through high school, including beginning violins and cellos, the intermediate String Ensemble, Pizzazz, and STRAZZ.

"These students are an inspiration to the community," said David Bugli, conductor of the Carson City Symphony.

The ensembles will be conducted by Laura Gibson and guest conductor Dr. Brian Fox.

The program will include familiar works and some surprises. The audience can expect to hear music from "Star Wars," Steven Rosenhaus' Cinematic Escapades, and STRAZZ Variations by Strings in the Schools violist Nick Rosen.

Strings in the Schools, now in its 12th year, is Carson City Symphony Association's tuition-free after-school program for young string players.

Founded by Education Director Sue Jesch, about 100 students currently participate in the program.

The program is supported, in part, by public funds through grants from the Nevada Arts Council, Partnership Carson City, Terry Lee Wells Foundation, Soroptimist International of Carson City, and by private donations.

For information, go to CCSymphony.com, or call Jesch at 775-450-5584.