‘Lion King, Jr.’ starring local youth coming to Carson City | NevadaAppeal.com

‘Lion King, Jr.’ starring local youth coming to Carson City

Experience the Circle of Life when more than 70 local youth recreate an adapted version of one of Disney’s classic animated films.

“The Lion King, Jr.” by Youth Theatre Carson City opens Friday and runs weekends through Jan. 22 at the Bob Boldrick Theater inside the Carson City Community Center.

Disney’s “The Lion King” has captivated the imagination of audiences around the world, and now, for the first time, it’s coming to Northern Nevada in this one-of-a-kind musical experience.

In the production, the African Savannah comes to life with Simba, Rafiki and an unforgettable cast of characters as they journey from Pride Rock to the jungle … and back again, in this inspiring coming-of-age tale.

Geared for families, the show features favorite songs from famed composers Elton John and Tim Rice, including “Circle of Life,” “I Just Can’t Wait to Be King,” “Can You Feel the Love Tonight,” and “Hakuna Matata.”

The Carson City production will feature more than 70 local youth in pre-kindergarten through ninth grade.

Sharing the title role are Clarissa Quintana, 10, and Parker Schmid, 10, as young Simba; and Hayden Breiter, 13, and Tony Gurrieri, 13, as the grown-up Simba.

Also featured are a host of young singers, dancers, actors playing favorite Disney characters and representing the animals of the Pride Lands.

Supporting the young cast is a small group of dedicated teenage interns in grades 10-12 who have assisted with musical direction, choreography, and staging.

“I am so incredibly proud of this amazing group of young people,” said Andie Anderson, artistic director of Youth Theatre Carson City and Director of “The Lion King, Jr.” “This is an incredibly difficult, incredibly artistic piece, and every single member of the cast has worked so hard to make the story come to life in such a beautiful way. They are enchanting.”

Performances are at 7 p.m. Jan. 13-14 and 20-21; and 2 p.m. Jan. 14-15 and 21-22. The Community Center is at 851 E. William St.

Tickets are $12 for general admission and $10 for students and seniors. Get them at http://www.youththeatrecarsoncity.com.

Youth Theatre Carson City is a youth theatre program whose mission is to provide a safe, inclusive environment for local youth grades K-12 and their families to learn and grow through quality theatrical experiences. It operates in association with the Carson City Department of Recreation and the Bob Boldrick Theater.

A leisurely drive through Washoe Valley

One of the best things about driving from Carson City to Reno is taking the time to jump off U.S. 395 and travel on Old U.S. 395 (also called Bowers Mansion Road) through Washoe Valley.

The eight-mile stretch from just below Lakeview (the hill at the north end of Carson City) to the rise at the northern end of Little Washoe Lake is one of the most scenic in Western Nevada.

So, while you could race on U.S. 395 through the middle of the valley, a far more leisurely and enjoyable trip can be found by along the west side of the valley.

To take this route, head north of Carson City on U.S. 395, then turn off on East Lake Boulevard (exit 44) and follow what some still refer to as Old U.S. 395.

Life immediately becomes less harried on the old highway, which now serves as a parallel frontage road. Rather than competing on the 395 speedway, this road encourages more casual travel.

As you drive along you begin to notice things such as the fact that Washoe Valley serves as transitional zone between the dry, high desert country that includes most of the state and the greener, more wooded eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada Range.

To the west is Slide Mountain, which at 9,694-feet is the tallest peak in this portion of the Sierra Nevada range while the eastern side is bordered by the Virginia Range.

You can also see traces of a rural Nevada lifestyle that is rapidly disappearing in the northwestern part of the state as a result of increasing urbanization. A flock of sheep graze in a grassy field while a little farther up the road is a sprawling ranch with acres of fertile grassland and a half dozen horses huddled under a shade tree.

At about the three-mile point, you reach Franktown Road, a worthwhile side trip. Turn left and you will notice how the surroundings change even more dramatically. You leave the openness of the valley and drive through clusters of tall pine trees. Even the air feels cooler.

Ranches here seem to have more ostentatious names and the livestock becomes more exotic with some of the ranches raising Arabian horses and llama.

The homes also grow more impressive. Hidden among the tall trees are massive Tudor and Edwardian castles, sprawling country estates, and, in one case, a modern glass and wood monolith that boasts an entire wall of windows overlooking the valley and, inexplicably, a large statue of a Chinese lion.

It was also in Franktown, in the early 1920s, that western writer and illustrator Will James built a comfortable four-room cabin on five acres. During his four years living in Washoe Valley, James wrote many of his most famous books including “Smoky, the Cowhorse” and “Cowboys North and South.”

The Franktown area was one of the first to be settled in Nevada. In the early 1850s, Mormon pioneers established farms in the foothills. Within three years, a small community was laid out, which included one of the region’s first sawmills.

In the late 1850s, most of the Mormon settlers returned to Utah during a dispute between the church and the U.S. Government. Their lands were acquired, sometimes illegally, by the non-Mormon residents of Nevada that remained behind.

A large stamp mill was built in Franktown to process the gold and silver ore that had been discovered in nearby Virginia City. However, by the mid-1860s, the mine owners decided to shift ore-processing operations closer to the mines and the facility was dismantled.

Within a few years, most of the commercial development associated with Franktown disappeared and the area assumed the pastoral agricultural identity that it largely retains today.

Franktown Road rejoins the old highway after a five-mile loop. A state historical marker located near the intersection provides a brief but interesting history of Franktown.

About a mile from the Franktown intersection is Bowers Mansion. This impressive two-story building was built in 1864 by Lemuel S. “Sandy” Bowers and his wife, Eilley Orrum Bowers, who were among the first millionaires created by the fabulous mining wealth in Virginia City.

As if to compensate for their humble beginnings — Sandy Bowers was an illiterate Scottish prospector and his wife a former boardinghouse keeper — the Bowers’ furnished the mansion with the finest European furniture and art collected during several trips abroad.

Sandy died a few years after the house was built and Eilley continued to live there, even after the money ran out. Ultimately, she was forced to sell the mansion and return to Virginia City, where she was forced to eke out a living by telling fortunes.

The mansion was eventually sold to Washoe County, which developed a recreational complex around the house (which is open for tours) that includes a geothermal swimming pool, picnic areas, volleyball courts, and horseshoe pits.

A little farther up the road is another historical marker detailing the history of another of Washoe Valley’s ghosts, the community of Ophir. Today, all that remains of Ophir are stone walls adjacent to Washoe Lake.

From here, the road continues another mile or so before reconnecting with U.S. 395 and ending — far too quickly—this picturesque journey.

Rich Moreno covers the history of Nevada.

Carson City Brewery Arts Center hosting reception with live music, art

An afternoon of art and music is planned on Saturday when the Brewery Arts Center comes alive with an art reception featuring live music by Dale Poune.

Winning pieces of the Nevada Artists Association’s “Road to the Future” art display are up at the association’s gallery inside the Brewery Arts Center.

The display is being held in conjunction with NAA’s Winter Art Show; both displays will be up through Feb. 17.

The participating artists will be honored at Saturday’s reception, at which food and wine will be served.

Additionally, awards will be given for first, second and third places.

Melanie Walters of Minden is the first place winner for her painting, “A Winter Day in Carson.” Tamara Bay of Carson City came in second with “Carson and Musser,” and Carson City’s Christi Hollibon took third with her painting, “Comma Coffee.”

Walter Daniels’ oil painting, “Let’s Go Home,” the People’s Choice winner from the Nevada Day Art Show, also is on display.

The BAC gallery, at 449 W. King St., is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free and all art is for sale.

The Nevada Artists Association gallery is a nonprofit cooperative made up of more than 100 local and regional artists. For more information, go to nevadaartists.org.

Also on Saturday, the Brewery Arts Center is continuing its Celtic music series with a performance by The Fire, a Scottish band that combines bagpipes, guitar, bodhrán, whistle and bouzouki.

The performance from 7 to 9 p.m. will be in the Maizie Harris Jesse Black Box Theater. Tickets are $10 for BAC members; $12 for seniors and students; $15 for adults and $20 at the door.

For tickets, go to breweryarts.org.

Carson City area live entertainment for Jan. 12-18, 2017

Trippin’ King Snakes from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday at the Carson Nugget Sports Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

In Stride Music at noon today at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Smoken Rabbits at 8 p.m. Friday at Genoa Bar, 2282 Main St., Genoa.

An open mic night open to all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Hindsight at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 W. Third St., Suite 8.

Brian Lester at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Js’ Old Town Bistro in Dayton.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino today and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Karaoke at The Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St., from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday.

Just Us at 7 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Escalade at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Tom Miller from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Corky Bennett from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at La Posada Real, 3205 Retail Drive.

Tom Miller at 6 p.m. Saturday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Karaoke at Beercade, 1930 N. Carson St., adjacent to Carson City Inn, from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturdays.

Patrick Major at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

CW and Dr. Spitmore at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Daniel Gaughan from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Genoa Lakes Golf Course & Resort, 1 Genoa Lakes Drive.

Dave Leather’s acoustic Americana music at noon Wednesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St., and 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Billy Starr at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Red Dog Saloon, 76 N. C St. in Virginia City.

Send live music and entertainment information to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com by end of day Tuesday for inclusion.

Concerts coming up at Carson City’s BAC this weekend

The weekend is full of music at the Brewery Arts Center.

On Saturday, The Fire, a Scottish band with bagpipes, guitar, bodhran, whistle, and bouzouki, perform.

The group includes International Scottish Fiddle Champion Rebecca Lomnicky, David Brewer of Celtic band Molly’s Revenge, and Adam Hendey on guitar and bouzouki.

The concert is at 7 p.m. in the Maizie Harris Jesse Black Box Theater. Tickets purchased in advance are $10 for BAC members, $12 for seniors and students and $15 for general admission. Tickets still available at the door will be $20.

On Sunday, Bostyx, featuring David Victor, a guitarist/vocalist with the band Boston, plays classic 70s rock-and-roll of the bands Boston and Styx.

Victor recreates the vocals of Boston’s Brad Delp and Styx’s Tommy Shaw while drummer and lead vocalist Glenn Jost handles the distinctive lead vocals of Styx co-founder Dennis DeYoung.

Bostyx’ will perform unplugged.

The concert is 6 p.m. in the BAC Performance Hall.

Tickets in advance are $15 for BAC members, $25 for general admission, and $20 for students and seniors.

Tickets for both performances are available at breweryarts.org or in the Artisan Store, 411 W. King St.

Reception set for Montana artist

The Churchill Arts Council will present an artist’s reception for Montana artist, Jerry Iverson — whose works are on view in the E.L. Wiegand Gallery — on Jan. 21.

The artist will conduct a walk-through of his exhibition, “Black Lines Broken Lines, “ a series of large scale abstract paintings. The event will be held from 5-7 p.m. on Jan. 21 and is free and open to the public.

Iverson was raised on a farm in South Dakota and currently lives outside Big Timber, Montana. His work has been exhibited across the country ranging from such venues as hanging his series of Language paintings from a fence running across their ranch to being in the permanent collections of the Yellowstone Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Portland Art Museum and many others.

The artist has said that his work has two parts, “how it looks” and “what it means.” He will discuss these ideas during his walk-through of the show.

How the work looks is determined by the balance and color of the forms and textures—for the last 15 years, the artist has used only Sumi ink, paper, rabbit skin glue on board—an in many pieces, previous layers show through translucent paper, showing the development of ideas deep below the surface.

What it means is reflected in the various series of works. Language deals with the difficulties of communicating; the Untitled Series is experimental and is concerned with composition; the Darwin’s Trees series evokes versions of Charles Darwin’s “Tree of Life” and how things diverge; and, Causation is sometimes about causal relationships in life and, as the artist notes, how sometimes it’s one big mess.

One of the high points of CAC’s 2016-2017 performances will be the show with the Bill Charlap Trio on January 28. Charlap is one of the most prominent, and critically acclaimed, pianists of his generation.

He’s recorded with many of the Jazz masters of our time, from Wynton Marsalis to Tony Bennett and Barbara Streisand and currently serves as the Artistic Director of the 92ndY’s summer Jazz Festival in New York. Over the years, he’s released a dozen albums including the Grammy-winning “Silver Lining: Songs of Jerome Kern,” with Tony Bennett and his Leonard Bernstein tribute CD, “Somewhere.”

Tickets are $17 for CAC members, $20 for non-members and can be picked up at Jeff’s Copy Express, ITT @ NAS Fallon, or by calling Churchill Arts at 775-423-1440. Please note that Charlap will also hold a free and open-to-the-public conversation on his musical influences at 3 p.m. on the day of the performance.

Kirk Robertson covers the arts and may be reached at news@lahontanvalleynews.com

Think it’s cold? Try the winter of 1889-90

With temperatures dipping and snow blanketing many of Nevada’s ranges, it’s a good time to reflect on what many historians consider the worst winter on record—the so-called “White Winter” of 1889-90.

The winter of 1889 — not unlike this year’s winter snow — marked the end of a period of extremely dry years.

In the beginning, Northern Nevada ranchers and farmers welcomed the December storms that assured a white Christmas. By late December, Virginia City was reporting 20-foot drifts that blocked roads and prevented the Virginia & Truckee Railroad trains from reaching Silver City.

And it would get far worse. Temperatures dropped to 20 below zero in Reno on January 2, 1890 and heavy snow fell almost continually from January 5 to January 8 — more than 51 inches of snow—and for much of the rest of the month.

Trains over the Sierra ran intermittently, depending on the weather, then, in mid-January, became stranded in Reno for more than two weeks. Washoe Valley had 8 to 10 foot drifts (a V & T train became stuck there for five days) while Carson City’s was so snowbound that the telegraph lines were down and there was no outside mail service.

Nevada historian Phillip Earl notes that the “Carson Appeal” became so desperate for items to fill its pages that it solicited readers for news and resorted to printing poetry.

More than 600 train passengers were stranded in Reno during the last two weeks in January. One, an East Coast newspaper editor, even found the time to produce his own paper, “The Snowbound,” filled with letters, essays and poetry about the snow.

In addition to all of that, several houses collapsed from the massive amounts of snow on their roofs, gravediggers found the ground too hard to bury the dead and hundreds of water pipes froze and burst.

Meanwhile, in Elko the situation was even worse. Heavy snow had begun to fall in early December and continued for most of the month. An amazing 18 inches dropped in one day, during the week after Christmas.

Then, as in northwestern Nevada, temperatures plummeted. According to James Young, a U.S. Department of Agriculture range scientist writing in the January 1984 issue of “Nevada Magazine,” by January 6, it was 40 below zero and, on January 15, temperatures fell to nearly 60 below.

Cattle began freezing to death on the range and ranchers trying to ship the few survivors to other markets found the trains could not operate in the snow.

While northwestern Nevada temperatures finally warmed in early February and life began to return to normal, the treacherous winter continued in northeastern Nevada. After a brief warming period in early March, a final winter storm on March 17 dumped additional rain, sleet and snow.

Most of the remaining cattle that had survived the earlier snows perished during this last freeze. Young estimates that 95 percent of the Elko area’s cattle died that winter.

And lest you think that was the only winter worse than the present one, historical weather records note at least another half dozen that easily surpassed it. For instance, the winter of 1860-61 reportedly included some 32 days of continuous snowing in northwestern Nevada.

Additionally, the winter of 1951-52 was also quite severe, with six foot walls of snow recorded in Reno by mid-January. That winter also saw Highway 40 (predecessor to Interstate 80) closed for 28 days.

A Southern Pacific streamliner with 196 passengers also became trapped for seven days in the Sierra (the passengers were removed after four days), capturing the imagination of the nation’s press. That winter, rail traffic through the Sierra was held up for more than 11 straight days.

And while this year’s winter weather seems pretty tame in comparison, remember that winter doesn’t officially end until April 1.

Rich Moreno covers the history of Nevada.

Bill Charlap trio brings its jazz to Fallon

The Churchill Arts Council will present a performance by the critically acclaimed ensemble, the Bill Charlap Trio, on Jan. 28 in the Barkley Theatre at the Oats Park Art Center.

Charlap has garnered critical praise, and developed a loyal following, for his inventive interpretations of tunes from the Great American Songbook including albums devoted to the works of George Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein.

The trio (with bass player Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington, who are not related) was formed in 1997 and have since come to be regarded as one of the most distinctive groups in Jazz.

The trio’s been nominated for two Grammys, for both a live album recorded at New York City’s the Village Vanguard and “Somewhere,” the Bernstein album. Last year Charlap’s collaboration with Tony Bennett—“Silver Lining: The Songs of Jerome Kern”—received the Grammy for Best Traditional Jazz/Pop Album.

The group’s most recent album is “Notes From New York,” which was recorded right after they completed a two-week run of shows at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola in the Jazz at Lincoln Center series. The Guardian newspaper called it a “beautifully articulated” effort by one of the best piano trios ever.

NPR has noted that no one handles the songs of Tin Pan Alley, the backbone of the Great American Song book, with greater care, and Charlap’s empathetic interpretations convey his absolute love of the material. It promises to be one of the highlights of the Churchill Arts Council’s 2016-2017 season of performances.

Charlap will present a free and open-to-the public conversation on his musical influences at 3:00 p.m. on the day of the performance in the Art Bar at the Center. This will be a great chance to interact with one of the greatest pianists working today.

The performance will follow at 8 p.m. Doors and the Art Bar will open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $17 for CAC members and $20 for non-members and can be purchased at Jeff’s Copy Express on Maine Street, at the MWR Office @ NAS Fallon or by calling Churchill Arts at 775-423-1440. There has been quite a bit of interest in this show, so for best availability purchase or reserve your tickets early.

Coming in February will be CAC’s film series and will feature three classic film starring Burt Lancaster. The 1960 film “Elmer Gantry” will screen on February 3 and will be followed by “The Swimmer” from 1968 on February 10. The series will conclude with a showing of “Atlantic City” from 1980 on Feb. 17.

We’ll have more information on the film series in the coming weeks.

Kirk Robertson covers the arts and may be reached at news@lahontanvalleynews.com

RENO PHILHARMONIC

A story rife with love, temptation and jealousy will be told through the music of renowned composers when Northern Nevada’s largest performing arts organization visits Carson City.

The Reno Philharmonic Orchestra is bringing Classix Four: Temptation to the Carson City Community Center at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 13.

The program will spotlight Mozart’s Overture to Cosi fan tutte and Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C major, op. 26, played by pianist Conrad Tao.

Tao, a native of Urbana, Ill., studied piano with Emilio del Rosario in Chicago and Yoheved Kaplinsky in New York.

The evening of romanticism will conclude with Dvorák’s Symphony No. 6 in D major, op. 60, B. 112.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 for adults, $24 for seniors, and free for kids 18 and under.

For tickets, go to http://www.renophil.com, or call 775-323-6393, or get them during business hours at the Reno Philharmonic Box Office, 925 Riverside Drive, Suite 3, Reno 89503.

Discounts are available for military members, Carson City Symphony patrons, and college students; contact the Reno Phil Box Office directly to learn more.

Beginning its 48th season, the orchestra, led by music director Laura Jackson, is a part-time, per-service orchestra comprised of more than 60 professional musicians who perform more than 30 concerts annually throughout the Reno, Carson Valley and Lake Tahoe region. It draws members from around the region, including Carson City, catering to all tastes, from classical to pop.

The Reno Philharmonic Association oversees and operates the professional orchestra, as well as a symphonic chorus, three youth orchestras and numerous educational and outreach programs. Musicians of the professional orchestra, youth orchestras, various ensembles and education programs offer more than 60 performances each year, playing to more than 55,000 people, half of them school-aged children.

For more information, go to renophil.com.

WEBER HEADLINES CARSON NUGGET

San Francisco Comedy Competition winner Myles Weber headlines The Nugget in Carson City, Nevada, for a night of stand-up on Friday.

Tickets for the gig are available for $13 in advance and $15 on the day of the show.

Additional information is available at http://www.mylesweber.com and http://www.visitrenotahoe.com.

At 8 years of age, Weber would sneak out of bed to watch stand-up comedy and went on to perform his own set at a school talent show. The rest is history.

“I won the whole thing doing stand-up, mainly because I was the only kid that wasn’t singing ‘Living La Vida Loca’ or ‘What a Girl Wants,’” Weber said.

“At that moment, Myles got bit by the comedy bug; hard. Since then, Myles became obsessed with stand-up comedy, studying the craft and performing almost nightly to get in his 10,000 hours,” states the comedian’s online biography.

MODEL TRAIN ENTHUSIASTS NEEDED

The California Trail Center is seeking model train enthusiasts to help create an interactive temporary exhibit during December.

The Trail Center is recruiting volunteers to create model train layouts, and to assist visitors in operating the trains.

“Model trains and Christmas go hand in hand,” said Park Ranger Alex Rose. “And learning about railroads through model trains is not only educational, but pure fun for the entire family.

”Trains played a vital role in the settlement of the American West. With the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869, powerful locomotives gradually replaced covered wagons. Railroad networks were much safer, quicker, and more efficient in transporting freight and people. Railroad history is also vital to the history of Elko and Elko County, “Rose said.

If interested in being part of this creative temporary exhibit, please contact Rose at 775-38-1849.

WNC GALLERY EXHIBIT

Curiosity drives Jill Brugler artistically, and she hopes “Dirty Diapers/Rabbit Ears” will attract the curious to the Western Nevada College’s Main Gallery to see her clay and ceramic exhibit.

“Dirty Diapers/Rabbit Ears” will be shown through Feb. 3.

“In showing this body of work, I am hoping to express a certain feeling I have as an artist working primarily in clay and ceramics,” said Brugler, a ceramics instructor at WNC. “The feeling I am trying to express is that of the curious. The curiosity of form, clay, ceramic, glaze and concept.

“My aspiration in installing “’Dirty Diapers/Rabbit Ears’ is to reflect those interests I have as a women and as an artist.”

Brugler’s passion for creating form from clay runs deep.

“I am creating ceramics based on my background in clay and art,” she said. “I believe a great mug is as creative as an effigy or sculpture. Clay is a billion-year-old medium, full of form. Each time I work with clay, I learn a little something new about clay, form, ceramic and glaze. A humbling occupation.”

Brugler struggles to explain why she and other artists create art, but it’s a career that gives her life symmetry.

During the spring semester at WNC, Brugler will be teaching two sessions of Ceramics I classes, and Victoria Buck will oversee a Ceramics II course. For more information on those classes or to register, go to http://www.wnc.edu/class-schedule/?term=2172.

Carson City area live entertainment

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 W. Third St., Suite 8.

Justin Lee at 7 p.m. today and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

The Trippin King Snakes from 8 to 11 p.m. Friday at Mummers Bar, 906 Victorian Square, Sparks.

Brian Lester at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Js’ Old Town Bistro in Dayton.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino today and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Karaoke at The Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St., from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday.

An open mic night open to all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Mo’z Motley Blues Band from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday at the Carson Nugget Sports Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

Tom Miller from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Local singers and songwriters performing their own work at 6 p.m. Friday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Corky Bennett from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at La Posada Real, 3205 Retail Drive.

Hallie Kirk at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St., during the Carson City Wine Walk at 1 p.m. Saturday.

Tom Miller at 6 p.m. Saturday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Karaoke at Beercade, 1930 N. Carson St., adjacent to Carson City Inn, from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturdays.

Mile High Jazz Band at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St. Admission is $5.

CW and Dr. Spitmore at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Daniel Gaughan from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Genoa Lakes Golf Course & Resort, 1 Genoa Lakes Drive.

George Pickard at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Dave Leather’s acoustic Americana music at noon Wednesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St., and 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Sassafras, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Billy Starr at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Red Dog Saloon, 76 N. C St. in Virginia City.

Send live music and entertainment information to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com by end of day Tuesday for inclusion.