Brewery Arts Center presenting La Misa Negra in summer concert series | NevadaAppeal.com

Brewery Arts Center presenting La Misa Negra in summer concert series

Latin beats are bringing the heat to this week's free outdoor concert at the Brewery Arts Center.

The Levitt AMP Carson City Music Series is picking up on Saturday with two Latin dance groups, Drinking With Clowns and La Misa Negra.

The show will kick off at 7 p.m. with Drinking With Clowns, a five-member band from Reno who plays a blend of Latin beats and funky rhythms.

From the thumping sounds of Afro-American drums in the streets of South America to the smooth, funky and soulful beats of the North American urban landscape, Drinking With Clowns bills its performances as a musical journey.

Following the opening set, La Misa Negra, an eight-piece band from Oakland, Calif., will take over with a blend of 1950s and '60s style cumbia and high-energy Afro-Colombian dance music.

The live music series is sponsored in part by the Mortimer & Mimi Levitt Foundation, a private family foundation that empowers communities to transform neglected public spaces into thriving destinations through the power of free live music.

The series presents 10 free concerts at the Minnesota Street Stage spanning musical genres like reggae, Southern rock, cumbia and bluegrass.

Rounding out this month will be Nashville's Southern Drawl Band on July 29.

Fresh off Coachella, psychedelic trio Thee Commons will perform on Aug. 5 with reggae royalty Marla Brown following on Aug. 12.

Five-piece electric newgrass group Dusty Green Bones will take the stage on Aug. 26 with the Cherry Pickers opening, and Irish Rockers and Young Dubliners will end the series on Sept. 2.

The public is invited to bring their own picnics, blankets and lawn chairs to the concerts, which will have an open lawn and lot seating. Food trucks, libations and kid's activities will be available at each of the shows. Pets on leash are welcomed as well.

The Levitt AMP concert series is at 449 W. King St. at the corner of King and Minnesota streets. Admission is free.

Visit http://levittamp.org/carson_city for a full schedule of concerts, directions and information on parking and wheelchair accessibility.

Book covers history of state assembly speakers

Nevada history buffs have a new resource to pour through.

Cindy Southerland, who retired from the Legislative Counsel Bureau in 2015, has put together an exhaustive history of the 62 men and women who served as Speaker of the Assembly for the state's first 150 years.

Southerland didn't want the book, titled Mister Speaker to Madam Speaker, to be a dry recitation of names and dates.

"Being involved in the system as long as I was, it became more interesting to me to learn the back story of the people, the social history, legislative service and also their personal life," she said.

She said the idea for the book has been around for some time but never really went anywhere. She said it was after she retired she "really got determined on it."

To give the book context, she said she read the journals and histories of every session from 1861 through the 2013 session to personalize each biography and create a section explaining his or her accomplishments and the key issues of the sessions in which they led the Assembly. She also included the key issues of each of the Special Sessions of the Nevada Legislature as well as a biography of the three Territorial Speakers and their accomplishments in the days leading to statehood.

The book was drawn from more than 180 resources and includes photographs or pictures of every Speaker except James A. Banks, the second person to hold that post. Southerland said there's simply no known photograph of Banks. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being the only one on the list who was murdered — shot to death in an Indian attack in 1867 while on a fishing trip with friends.

Since many went onto other offices after leaving the Legislature, she listed those accomplishments as well.

She said her interest developed over the more than 25 years she worked for the Legislative Counsel Bureau and the Legislature itself, a good share of that time for the Research Division. She said at the request of former Research Director Don Williams, she points out the book isn't the result of work performed by or at the direction of that division. She said, in fact, Williams told her it wasn't the type of publication the Legislature would create.

In that 150 years, she said there have been 18 Speakers who were actually born in Nevada and four who were born outside the United States. But one, Denver Dickerson, was born at the Nevada State Prison where the family lived at the time because his father was the warden.

Southerland said Nevada has changed dramatically over that time, shifting from a rural ranching and mining state to the mostly urban culture of today's Nevada. One significant change, she said, is the impact of term limits that limited service in each house to no more than 12 years. With that rule in place, there will never again be a Joe Dini, who served 36 years in the Assembly.

"The loss of institutional memory and decades of public service once so proudly enjoyed by a few have become a thing of the past," she wrote in her introduction.

The book ends at 2014. There have been two more Speakers since then — John Hambrick and Jason Frierson. But the book does include the two female Speakers who have served in the Assembly. Barbara Buckley was first, elected Speaker for the 2007 and 2009 sessions. Marilyn Kirkpatrick followed, winning that honor and responsibility for the 2013 session.

She said if this first effort is well received, she's thinking of doing a similar volume compiling biographies of the men who have served as Senate Majority Leader. To date, no woman has held that post.

Strolling the streets of historic Dayton

The rich history of the former mining town of Dayton is revealed in an informative 12-panel pamphlet produced by the Historical Society of Dayton Valley.

The brochure is packed with information about historic houses, commercial businesses, schools, churches and other noteworthy sites and structures—each with a fascinating story—that can be found in the area.

One side of the brochure is devoted to an historic overview of the community, including its claim as the state's first settlement (this a battle that has raged for several years between Dayton and Genoa). Additionally, there is a detailed timeline that describes significant dates and events in the town's development.

The centerfold, however, is the most useful section for those who enjoy exploring old Nevada communities. Listed are nearly 50 historic places (many of which still have original structures) that tell Dayton's story. A useful color map accompanies the brief descriptions.

The Walking-Driving Tour portion of the brochure begins, appropriately, at the 1865 Dayton Schoolhouse (135 Shady Lane), which, today, serves as the home of the Dayton Museum.

This classic stone structure was used as a school until 1958 and is the oldest schoolhouse in the state that is still located on its original site. In the 1960s to the 80s, the schoolhouse served as Dayton's senior center.

South of the school is historic Gold Cañon Creek, which flows from the small canyon where gold was discovered in Nevada. The original route of the creek has been changed over the years by various developments.

The heart of the tour is in Dayton's downtown, which is lined with various historic buildings and sites, each with a fascinating story. For instance, today's Dayton Justice Court (235 W. Main Street) was originally the Birdsall Mercantile erected in the 1860s.

Also called the Bluestone Building, this hand-quarried sandstone structure also served as a Wells Fargo & Co. office as well as home of the Bluestone Manufacturing Company, which made chemicals used to separate gold and silver ores from tailings.

The Old Saloon (160 Main Street), now a steakhouse, is a wooden building that was originally known as the Europa Bar. It was erected in 1885 on another location (the corner of Main and Pike) and moved to this site in the early 1900s.

Along the south side of Main Street are a handful of historic buildings that constitute the center of downtown. They include: the Fox Hotel (95 Main), which was built in 1889; the Union Hotel (75 Main), erected in about 1870; and the Old general hardware and grocery store (65 Main), which dates back to the 1870s.

Pike Street is also home to several historic sites and structures, including the Old Corner Bar (30 Pike), now a popular restaurant but originally home of the M. Meyer grocery store, which opened in the 1860s. Later the building was used as a dry goods store, then as an auto repair shop.

The two-story, red brick Odeon Hall at 65 Pike is one of Dayton's landmark buildings. It was erected in 1862 by the Odd Fellows and later was used as a hardware store, then as a theater and ballroom. In recent years, it has been used as a restaurant and saloon.

The historic Firehouse/Jail at 90 Pike is another of Dayton's older buildings, having been constructed in the 1860s, while the Camel Compound (200 Pike) was a hay barn built in 1861 that once corralled camels used to haul salt to the mines in Virginia City.

The Dayton Historical Walking Tour brochure is available at the Dayton Museum in the historic Dayton schoolhouse. For more information about historic Dayton, go to: http://daytonnvhistory.org/index.htm.

Rich Moreno covers the places and people that make Nevada want to visit.

Recipe: Grilled Italian sausage with bell peppers and onions by David Theiss

I may be enjoying summer's warm days, but that certainly doesn't mean I want the heat inside. So while cooking this summer, I suggest having a second thought about turning on that oven or stove and resort to cooking outside.

There are lots of choices nowadays for cooking everything, from main courses to desserts, on your grill. My favorite is fresh grilled veggies in the summer when all that produce is plentiful; but for today's recipe I will suggest a main course that's simple to grill, quick to make, and delicious: grilled Italian sausage, bell peppers, and onions served on a French roll with mustard.

You could also create your own variations with your favorite sausage and toppings like Basque chorizo sausage with a crunchy coleslaw on top! The possibilities are endless to create a delicious dinner!

For your sausage ingredients, I suggest obtaining lean sausages with no fillers. At Butler Meats, we make our sausages from lean pork shoulder, expertly trimmed, and seasoned. These sausages are also gluten-free, dairy-free, and free of eggs, soy, and nitrates; good sausages don't need any of those ingredients.

So, go fetch your favorite mustard (whether it be Dijon, deli, brown, or yellow) a good bread roll, and some sausage to create this quick, simple, and versatile meal.

Pro tip: I usually scoop out the extra bread in the center to make room for the good stuff! Also, using a corn tortilla instead of a bread roll is a tasty gluten-free option!

Italian sausage

Fresh Italian sausage takes a few minutes to cook, so get them grilling at medium heat, turning them three or four times. Don't poke the sausages, doing so lets the juices out and can cause flare-ups on your grill. Watch for fire flare. They're finished when internal temperature is 160 degrees, don't overcook as they become dry and less tasty.

We will be sampling Italian sausage and chorizo, as well as selling the cooked sandwiches at the 3rd and Curry St. Farmers Market Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come check us out.

Enjoy!

Peppers and Onions

Orange or yellow bell peppers are best, deveined and chopped into large pieces. For the onion, yellow is best, also chopped in large pieces.

In sauté pan add 1 tablespoon olive oil, peppers and onions, and sauté for about 8 to 10 minutes, dash with salt and black pepper.

Use mustard as a condiment. I love a good Dutch crunch roll. Hollow out the middle, place sausage in roll, add mustard, pepper and onion mixture, and serve.

Chorizo sandwich

For the easy creamy slaw:

Ingredients

5 cups shredded coleslaw mix, cabbage carrots, purple cabbage

1 cup mayonnaise

2 tablespoons sugar

2 tablespoons white vinegar

6-ounce can of pineapple juice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon celery seed

Directions

Combine all ingredients to make sauce, then pour over coleslaw mix and fold mixture until completely coated. Cover and store in fridge for half an hour for best results.

For the chorizo:

Grill chorizo sausage like the Italian sausage: medium heat, turning 3-4 times. Don't poke. Cook until internal temperature is 160 degrees.

Remove extra bread from center of roll, place sausage in roll with slaw mixture on top, and add mustard to taste.

And enjoy your summer cooking outside!

David Theiss is owner and operator of Butler Gourmet Meats in Carson City.

Carson City live entertainment for July 19-25

Tully Green from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. today at McFadden Plaza near Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8; and from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the 3rd and Curry St. Farmers Market; and 5:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Denver Saunders at 6 p.m. today and 7 p.m. Thursday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Dave Leather's acoustic Americana at noon today at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St., and 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Sassafras Eclectic Food Joint, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Prey for Son at 8 p.m. Friday at Westside Pour House, 110 W. Telegraph St.

Bitter Endings and Bright Beginnings, a saxophone recital by Jessica R. Tucker and Katie Lauder, at 7 p.m. Friday at the Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall, 511 W. King St.

An open mic for all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Clint and Ila at 6 p.m. Friday at the Silver Queen Hotel in Virginia City.

Husky Burnette at 7 p.m. Friday at the Red Dog Saloon in Virginia City.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8.

John Dawson Band at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Blue Haven Blues Band at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Ponderosa Saloon in Virginia City.

Mic Smith at Taste of Downtown, a fundraiser for Advocates to End Domestic Violence, at 5 p.m. Saturday in downtown Carson City.

La Misa Negra at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Minnesota Street Stage near the Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino Thursdays and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Live music from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday at The Loft inside the Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., and guitarists from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday at the casino's Alatte Coffee and Wine Bar.

Karaoke from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday at the Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St.

Tom Miller from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Sassafras Eclectic Food Joint, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Live comedy by Kabir Singh at 8 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St. Tickets for $15 are at carsoncomedyclub.com or the casino's guest service center.

The Timothy O'Neil Band at 7 p.m. Saturday at The Canvas Cafe in Virginia City.

Karaoke by J&M Productions from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

Mentally Spent at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Highway 42 at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

Corky Bennett from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at La Posada Real, 3205 Retail Drive.

Musicians of all genres and styles are welcome at a jam session from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Jamie Rollins at 6 p.m. Sunday through Tuesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

CW and Dr. Spitmore at noon Tuesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Have an entertainment event? Send it to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com.

Art display and a reception to feature Monroe brothers

An art exhibit and reception will center on two brothers who contributed original paintings, sketches and other pieces to the region's art scene in the first half of the 20th century.

Alpine County Historical Society's fundraiser from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the Alpine County Museum will celebrate the life and legacy of Walt and Art Monroe.

Paintings by the brothers from private and other collections will be shown for the first time at the fundraiser.

The exhibit is free, but donations will be accepted to offset expenses and make money for the museum, located at 1 State Route 89, Markleeville.

Also, the Historical Society is searching for paintings by Walt for documentation and exhibition at a later date.

Walt was born in the mining town of Monitor, south of Markleeville, in 1881. The family moved to a small ranch just outside of Markleeville where seven more children joined the family.

When he was 16, he had his first art exhibit at a hotel in Carson City, an event noted in the Nevada Appeal: "In Markleeville, Alpine County, California, lives a boy by the name of Walter Monroe. He is a genius in his way. There is on exhibition at the Briggs House some very superior hand carvings of horses and dogs done by this young life. His perfect work is done with a jack knife."

Some of his carvings are on permanent exhibit at the Alpine County Museum.

Though Walt was a prolific artist, canvas and other art supplies were non-existent in Markleeville at the time. If he didn't have canvas, he painted on wood, cardboard, tin, even pans and anything else he could get his hands on. Members of the Monroe family still have a collection of letters whose backs are covered in Walt's sketches.

The artist never married, perhaps because he was often on the road traveling between Oregon, Bishop, Tonopah and Markleeville, where his parents, siblings and cousins lived.

He traveled on his motorcycle with a sidecar packed with clothing, canvas, paints and other art supplies. He didn't have a regular job, but he was a competent carpenter and mechanic.

When Walt arrived in Markleeville, he wasn't an unwanted guest — he was known for making toys, sleds, skis and other items out of salvaged goods for local children.

Members of the Historical Society said although he called many places home, he loved Alpine County — especially Markleeville — and it was his favorite subject to paint and sketch.

He died June 13, 1945 in a Reno hospital and is buried in Woodfords, Calif., with his grandparents.

The artist had family ties to Alpine County, Carson City, Virginia City, Carson Valley, Mason Valley, Tonopah and Bishop, so it's likely his work may be hanging at local sites.

Many locals are known to have purchased or been given art from the struggling artist from 1895 and into the 1940s. The society says he generally signed his work at the bottom right corner, but not always.

For information or if you have Walt Monroe paintings or other art, contact Shannon Hickey at 775-315-0697 or Alpine County Historical Society, P.O. Box 517, Markleeville, Calif., 96120.

Aurelia Chamber Players to star in outdoor concert

The Aurelia Chamber Players will perform at the Dangberg Home Ranch Historic Park at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday.

The Aurelia Chamber Players have played together since 2014 and are comprised of concertmaster of the Reno Philharmonic, Dr. Ruth Lenz; pianist Nicholas Carthy; principal cellist of the Reno Philharmonic, Peter Lenz; Cello Professor Emeritus for the University of Nevada Reno, John Lenz; bluegrass and Reno Philharmonic violinist Ellen Flanagan; and internationally accomplished violist Anne Ristorcelli.

Johnny Lenz, principal cellist of the Susanville Symphony and cellist with the Reno Philharmonic, will act as artistic director for this event.

Aurelia is the Latin word for "golden," which not only describes the group's music but also the link between the golden state of California, where Aurelia performed its first series, and with the largest gold producing state, Nevada, where most of these musicians were born and raised.

This event will not be a typical chamber music concert, but will be performed largely using amplified electric instruments.

"The selections will not be all classical music and there will be something for everyone," said Aurelia Chamber Player member Lauren Lenz.

The concert is just one of many events planned this summer at the park.

"We are particularly excited to have the Aurelia Chamber Players here at Dangberg Historic Park this summer. We've not had a concert like this in prior years and are pleased to hear how popular this music and these musicians are in Northern Nevada," said the park's events manager, Kim Harris.

The concert is sponsored by SoaringNV, Douglas County, Bently Ranch, Dr. James the Dentist, NV Energy, Ridge Tahoe Resort, Carson Valley Chamber of Commerce, A.B.E. Printing and Copy Center, Jacobs Berry Farm, Nevada State Bank and the Frances C. and William P. Smallwood Foundation.

Admission is $10 for adults, free for 16 and younger and $5 for members of Dangberg Home Ranch.

The park is at 1450 Highway 88, 1/4 mile north of the Carson Valley Veterinary Hospital. This is an outdoor event, and visitors should bring their own seating. Dogs aren't permitted at this event.

Upcoming concerts at the park are Ten Dollar Pony on Aug. 3; Ciana on Aug. 17; and Todd Morgan and the Emblems on Aug. 31.

The full Dangberg Summer Festival schedule and other information can be found at dangberghomeranch.org.

Family Stone has everyone dancing at Carson City concert

People from all over the region danced to the music Wednesday night – like everyday people – once The Family Stone hit the stage at the 2017 Concert Under the Stars.

As Café at Adele's co-produced the concert – along with Carson Tahoe Health as the event's first title sponsor – the crowds filled the Brewery Arts Center's Minnesota Street Stage area as expected. Past concerts were held on West John Street near the restaurant.

BAC Executive Director Gina Lopez Hill said the infrastructure for the concert was already in place, in the midst of the Levitt AMP Carson City concert series.

"We hope our participation can help raise even more funds for the Greenhouse Project," she said.

"Carson City is proving that we're supporting this factor and continue to host great events for the community."

Opening for The Family Stone was rock, soul, and R&B artist Lydia Pense with her band, Cold Blood. The artists have been touring together nationally since the beginning of the year.

This year also marks the 50th anniversary of Sly & The Family Stone, as they're inductees of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Although the iconic Sly Stone didn't perform with the band, The Family Stone's classic funk and psychedelic tunes lifted every soul in the crowd, with many reminiscing the old days in their thoughts and even newer generations in attendance.

Stone retired from the band 30 years ago after a battle with drug use.

The ninth annual concert benefits The Greenhouse Project, a Nevada non-profit that maintains a community-based greenhouse through Carson High School for the purpose of creating educational and vocational opportunities for students, youth groups and special needs individuals in a garden setting.

Michele Lewis, board member of The Greenhouse Project, is also an administrator at the high school.

She said the project itself is a great opportunity for students in Carson City to get involved with community outreach projects.

The Greenhouse is located behind the bus lot on campus.

"It's a huge asset to both the school and the community," she said.

"We grow fresh produce from there and 10 percent of it goes to the culinary class. Our special needs students also get involved; they helped grow the hanging flower baskets located downtown from the greenhouse."

In addition to the fundraiser, a live auction was held during intermission of the show with area businesses offering gifts and cash prizes – from spa gift cards to a donated day of golf.

Other sponsors that were recognized included NV Energy, Gold Dust West, Dick Campagni's Carson City Toyota, Northern Nevada Toyota Dealers and Tito's Handmade Vodka.

Sassabration, Senior Follies highlight weekend entertainment

Carson City gets sassy this weekend with two of the major events in the community being Sassabration and the Senior Follies.

SASSABRATION

The third annual Sassabration takes place from noon to 10 p.m. July 15 at Sassafras Eclectic Food Joint, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road (in the Carson Hot Springs complex).

The event raises money for local nonprofits that provide outreach and health services to the LGBTQ community, and is conducted by restaurant owner Jayme Watts.

The day's festivities include a Drag Race Bike Ride, at 11 a.m., which starts at Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St., and concludes at Sassafras, as well as an array of vendors and live music at the restaurant throughout the day.

Carson Hot Springs also will be open at no cost to celebrate Customer Appreciation Day.

For information, call Watts at 775-884-4471, or email sassabration@gmail.com.

SENIOR FOLLIES

The annual show celebrates its 20th year with three performances at the Carson City Community Center's Bob Boldrick Theater, July 14-16.

This year's theme is As Seen On TV and features skits, songs and performances inspired by variety shows and series of the past like the Ed Sullivan Show, the Lawrence Welk Show, Bonanza and The Golden Girls, and today's Dancing with the Stars featuring the waltz and the Paso.

The production raises money for the Carson City Senior Center's Meals on Wheels program.

Performances of Senior Follies' As Seen On TV are 7 p.m. July 14 and 2 p.m. on July 15 and 16 at the Bob Boldrick Theater, Carson City Community Center, 851 E. William St.

Tickets are $10 and available at the Senior Center or starting an hour before each performance at the theater.

Admission is free for children aged 5 and younger.

For more information, call 883-0703.

Carson City live entertainment for July 12-18

Dave Leather's acoustic Americana at noon today at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.; and 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Sassafras Eclectic Food Joint, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road; and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the 3rd and Curry St. Farmers Market.

Patrick Major at 6 p.m. today at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Tully Green from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at McFadden Plaza, near Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8, and 1-4 p.m. Saturday at the Ponderosa Saloon, 106 S. C St., Virginia City.

The Vegas Road Show at 7 p.m. Thursday and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

An open mic for all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Peaceful Easy, an Eagles tribute band, from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at Minden Park, 1600 Sixth St.

Southbound Train from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Ponderosa Saloon, 106 S. C St., Virginia City.

Clint and Ila at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Silver Queen Hotel, 28 C St., Virginia City.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8.

Drinking With Clowns at noon Saturday during Sassafras Eclectic Food Joint's annual Sassabration event at 1500 Old Hot Springs Road. The celebration of diversity, community and equality offers food, vendors and live music. Proceeds go to local charities.

Gene Evaro Jr. at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Minnesota Street Stage near the Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King St.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino Thursdays and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Arizona Jones from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday at The Loft inside the Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., and guitarists from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday at the casino's Alatte Coffee and Wine Bar.

Karaoke from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday at the Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St.

Live comedy by Kevin Farley at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Brewery Arts Center's Performance Hall, 511 W. King St.

Tom Miller from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at Sassafras Eclectic Food Joint, 1500 Old Hot Springs Road.

Live comedy by Mrs. John Hughes at 8 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St. Tickets for $15 are at carsoncomedyclub.com or the casino's guest service center.

Karaoke by J&M Productions from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

Reckless Envy at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Hindsight at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

Corky Bennett from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at La Posada Real, 3205 Retail Drive.

Deception playing music of the 1980s and '90s from 2 to 6 p.m. at Genoa Bar's free Sunday Porch Party. The bar, at 2282 Main St., Genoa, offers the outdoor Slushy Rum Runner Bar and food by Genoa Station.

Rock River at 6 p.m. Sunday and Monday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Musicians of all genres and styles are welcome at a jam session from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

CW and Dr. Spitmore at noon Tuesday at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Denver Saunders at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Have an entertainment event? Send it to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com.