Vegas shooter had no visual brain abnormalities | NevadaAppeal.com

Vegas shooter had no visual brain abnormalities

LAS VEGAS — The Latest on the Las Vegas shooting (all times local):

11:30 a.m.

Authorities say the Las Vegas shooter had no visual abnormalities in his brain.

Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters Friday that Stephen Paddock that an autopsy found nothing unusual during a visual inspection, but his brain was shipped to a facility to look for any minute problems.

Authorities haven't determined why Paddock opened fire on a concert crowd, killing 58 people before shooting himself. Some believed an autopsy could shed light on any medical problems that could have contributed.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Aaron Rouse says investigators have found no signs that Paddock had ideologies or connections to any groups.

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11:15 a.m.

Authorities the Las Vegas shooter fired at aviation fuel tanks "with intent."

Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters Friday that Stephen Paddock shot at the fuel tanks at McCarran International Airport near the Mandalay Bay hotel, where he opened fire onto a concert crowd below.

Paddock killed 58 people before shooting himself.

Lombardo says the airport is reviewing safety measures and has contacted experts in fuel storage but that there's a low probability aviation fuel could be ignited by gunfire.

The sheriff says 45 people injured in the massacre Oct. 1 remain hospitalized in critical condition.

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12:20 a.m.

Nearly two weeks after the Las Vegas mass shooting, authorities have yet to sort out the basic facts.

Las Vegas police are expected to release new information about the case Friday after a week that has seen the timeline of the shooting shift almost daily, raising questions about whether authorities could have done more to stop the gunman before he killed 58 people.

On Monday, police said Stephen Paddock sprayed 200 rounds into the hallway, wounding an unarmed security guard in the leg. They said six minutes later, he unleashed his barrage of bullets on the festival crowd and then took his own life.

MGM Resorts International, which owns the Mandalay Bay, said Thursday it was no more than 40 seconds between the time the guard called for help and Paddock opened fire on the crowd.

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