County, Assembly decided | NevadaAppeal.com

County, Assembly decided

Christine Kuklica
ckuklica@lahontanvalleynews.com

The Churchill County Mosquito, Vector and Noxious Weed Abatement District board will remain the same after three incumbents regained their seats.

Christy Lattin, Jay Ligenfelter and Mike Spencer will return for second four-year terms.

Lattin led the way with 5,134 votes, followed by Spencer with 4,028, and Lingenfelter with 3,969. Challenger Joe Jordan brought up the rear with 3,312 votes.

Lattin said her experience in facilitation meetings and overseeing budgets provides her with the experience it takes to be on the board. This will be her second term on the board. She said managing staffing levels is at the top of her priority to work on in the near future because that is where the bulk of the budget is spent. She said her past experience on the board has prepared her to fulfill another term.

"I understand both the immediate and long-term goals of this district and can help the staff achieve them."

Lingenfelter will be setting on the board for his second term. He said his experience and knowledge in budgets; project planning and, employee management will help him in his role on the board. He said he would make sure the tax dollars are used effectively and the budget accountability, preventing the spread of West Nile Virus, and minimizing the spread of weeds in Churchill County.

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"I have a strong work ethic and great interest in ensuring our tax dollars are used effectively."

Spencer, will take the seat for his second term and is a former Nevada game warden. He said public health and new facilities are on the top of his priority list.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR

Bob Getto defeated Stuart Mackie for Public Administrator, 5,877 votes to 1,415.

Getto succeeds Jan Brown, who decided not to run for re-election. This will be Getto's first term. He is a business owner of two businesses in Churchill County. At the moment the position is not a paid one, but Getto hopes to change that. He said he would handle this position with professionalism and the respect that the families and estates deserve. Being available to the public is an important part of the job for Getto.

"I want to have a direct line and email address for myself so people can contact me directly without difficulty."

UNOPPOSED COUNTY RACES

Four candidates for county offices did not face opponents.

Denise Mondhink-Felton will be the new assessor after Norma Green decided to retire.

Kelley Helton retained her her seat for the clerk/treasurer position.

Pete Olsen will keep his seat on the Churchill County Commissioners board.

Art Mallory returns for another term as district attorney.

ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 38

Dr. Robin Titus soundly defeated two opponents for Assembly District 38 with 77 percent of the vote in Churchill County. As of press time, Lyon County had not weighed in.

The Smith Valley Republican defeated challengers Tim Fasano and John O'Connor for the seat being vacated by Tom Grady, who is termed out.

Titus led the way with 5,711 votes while Fasano had 794 and O'Connor had 635.

Titus, a Lyon County physician, has a passion for serving the Assembly. She opposed Tesla's incentives passed by the Legislature and said it will impact the infrastructure of the area with roads, fire and police protection and schools. She opposes Agenda 21 saying it will strip away property rights. Titus has met with water officials to see current issues and how to protect all water users. She also said it is important to make sure jobs stay in Nevada.

Fasano, from the Independent-American party, also opposed Agenda 21 and said it is a bad plan for any jurisdiction to think about it. He said water should be available for all ranchers and farmers and to maintain the area's agriculture industry. He believed that school districts must exercise smart spending, but also felt the teachers' unions were a problem.

O'Connor, a Libertarian and a native to Nevada, said his past experience provided him with a just foundation to run. He said he'd be able to close programs that weren't doing well and channel that money to education.

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