USPS continues study on Pony Express Station | NevadaAppeal.com

USPS continues study on Pony Express Station

Steve Ranson
sranson@lahontanvalleynews.com

The U.S. Postal Service is reviewing the possibility that the Pony Express Station— with its dedication plaque — could merge with the main post office on North Maine Street.

The U.S. Postal Service is continuing to assess its operations, but if a continuing study is any indication, Fallon's Pony Express Station may be riding off into the sunset.

In November, the postal service notified the post office's 260 customers about the possible consolidation of the Pony Express Station on Allen Road with the main Fallon office on North Maine Street. A 60-day comment period ended on Dec. 31, said David Rupert, USPS spokesman for Nevada.

He said the USPS is currently reviewing those comments and sending personal letter back to individuals who sent feedback. He said no timeline for a decision has been set.

"We expect a savings of more than $1.2 million over 10 years," he emailed the LVN. "These savings are attributable to the cost of the lease, utilities, personnel and custodial services. All of the boxes will be relocated to the Main Post Office, which is less than 1.5 miles from the current location. All box holders will be able to keep their current box number, city, and ZIP information, so their won't be any change of address inconveniences associated."

He said the USPS continues to experience financial losses including more than $5 billion in 2013. He said the USPS is examining every area of operation for waste and redundancy.

"The Pony Express Station is under utilized — out of more than 500 boxes, just 260 are rented," he said. "It is more fiscally prudent to consolidate our operations under one roof and we believe we can still maintain our current level of service."

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The Pony Express Station opened in 1997 during a time when Fallon and Churchill County was experiencing a boom in growth and population; however, since the Great Recession almost six years ago, building and population have evened out, while more people have relied on email for their daily correspondence.

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