Carson Tahoe unveils latest robotic surgery technology | NevadaAppeal.com

Carson Tahoe unveils latest robotic surgery technology

Carson Tahoe Health

Carson Tahoe Health (CTH) is excited to announce that the most advanced robotic surgical system, the da Vinci Xi, will be available at the Regional Medical Center beginning mid-November 2017. CTH will initially start by offering robot-assisted gynecological surgeries for qualifying patients, and will soon expand to minimally-invasive urology procedures within the next year. As the field of robotics has gained momentum and evolved as a medical school staple nationwide, obtaining this revolutionary technology also provides Carson Tahoe new recruitment opportunities and aids in securing future healthcare experts.

Designed with the latest robotic, computer, and optical innovations, the da Vinci Xi features a high-definition 3D (HD-3D) vision system, Intuitive Motion Technology, specialized 'wristed' instruments, and smart software that allow surgeons to operate with unparalleled precision, dexterity, and control. The system utilizes wireless capabilities and functions with 'video-game-like' motion controlled by the expertly trained surgeon. With its savvy visualization tools, coupled with a dynamic 'moving bed' that maneuvers patients into the ideal operating position, the da Vinci Xi facilitates easy access to even the most hard-to-reach areas inside the body. Additionally, the system and its movements are programmed to be entirely controlled by a surgeon, which translates into smaller, more defined hand movements for optimal results. Consequently, patients benefit from a quicker procedure time, shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, minimal scaring, and less need for narcotic pain medications.

"Acquiring the latest generation of robotic technology aligns directly with our commitment to advancing healthcare and investing in the future of our community," said Michelle Joy, Chief Operating Officer at Carson Tahoe Health. "Upon evaluating the newest research surrounding robotics and improved patient outcomes, we felt that now was the best time for us to invest in the da Vinci Xi."

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