Final mayoral candidate files campaign contributions | NevadaAppeal.com

Final mayoral candidate files campaign contributions

Ken Haskins raised a total of $12,542 to support his bid for Carson City mayor, putting him second in fundraising among the seven candidates seeking to replace Marv Teixeira.

Haskins, pastor at Carson City’s First Christian Church, was the only mayoral candidate whose report wasn’t available at the clerk’s office Tuesday afternoon. He filed his report in time for the Tuesday deadline, but in the wrong place, presenting it at the secretary of state’s office instead of the Carson City clerk/recorder.

Clerk/Recorder Alan Glover said the report is counted as on time.

Of Haskins’ total, $5,000 came from American Management Group. Another $1,000 came from Max Baer, who is still trying to find a home for his Beverly Hillbillies-themed casino.

Bob Crowell was the leader in city race contributions with $44,773.

Supervisor Richard Staub reported total contributions of $18,333 for his re-election bid. He has four challengers, but none of them reported contributions of more than $900.

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In the Assembly District 39 race in Douglas County, Incumbent Republican James Settelmeyer led in contributions with $24,620. But Democrat Joetta Brown raised a respectable $11,258. Independent American David Schuman reported zero contributions.

In Assembly District 32, incumbent Republican John Marvel of Battle Mountain is facing five Republican challengers in the primary, including former Assemblyman Don Gustavson and longtime Washoe County GOP activist Mike Weber. But Gustavson has raised only a bit more than $12,000 and Weber just $10,664 compared to Marvel’s more than $51,000.

Glenn Dawson, also a Republican, listed even more in contributions ” $61,186. But $50,000 of that came out of his own bank account.

Many reports filed by some of the most prominent candidates aren’t available yet because they were filed by certified mail and haven’t reached either the clerk’s office or secretary of state’s elections office but are still counted on time.

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