For mayor: Crowell, Haskins | NevadaAppeal.com

For mayor: Crowell, Haskins

Dave Frank
Appeal Staff Writer

BRAD HORN/Nevada AppealBoard of Education member Bob Crowell gives a 'thumbs up' to Nevada teacher of the year LeAnn Morris while she was speaking at a meeting in the Sierra Room at the Carson City Community Center on Monday.

Bob Crowell nearly won more than half the vote to take the Carson City mayor’s race Tuesday, but the five other candidates including general election opponent Ken Haskins peeled away enough votes to stop him short.

Crowell, an attorney and school board member, had more than 49 percent of the vote when the early voting results came in, but the number dropped a point when the final results appeared later that night.

Haskins, pastor of First Christian Church, had about 22 percent of 8,217 votes in the non-partisan election, with 36-year-old podiatrist Sean Lehmann coming in at third at 16 percent.

Crowell, 62, said he was “extremely humbled” by his support and promised to continue to talk about the issues in the general election he’s talked about since he announced his run in April ” an attractive downtown, regional cooperation, public safety, a strong economy and finishing the bypass.

He said his personal support of both ballot initiatives that include a sales tax increase for the V&T Railway project and a property tax increase for the sheriff and fire departments won’t stop him for respecting the decision of voters in November.

“At the end of the day, it’s really a community decision,” said Crowell, who works as a lobbyist for the law firm Kummer Kaempfer Bonner Renshaw & Ferrario.

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Haskins, known as the “Rockin’ Rev” for his years as a rock radio host, said he campaigned hard to win the primary and will have to fight hard to win the general election Nov. 4 against Crowell.

“He’s obviously the front-runner and I’m the underdog,” said Haskins, 54. “I’m going to give it the best shot I can.”

The pastor has run a campaign promising responsiveness to concerns of voters and fiscal conservatism. He said he respects Crowell, but they clearly disagree on taxes as shown by his opposition to the two ballot questions and Crowell’s support for them.

Lehmann said he will not endorse either candidate.

“I think on a cost-per-vote basis, we did very well,” he said, referring to himself.

Following Lehmann, Pete Hansell got about 7 percent of the vote, Jim Shirk got about 4 percent and Steve McClung, though popular at debates, got about 3 percent.

The results of the primary don’t speak well for Carson City, Hansell said.

“We just are obviously going to get the same-old, same-old,” he said.

Mayor Marv Teixeira is not seeking a fourth term.

– Contact reporter Dave Frank at dfrank@nevadaappeal.com or 881-1212.

Haskins, pastor of First Christian Church, had about 22 percent of 8,217 votes in the non-partisan election, with 36-year-old podiatrist Sean Lehmann coming in at third at 16 percent.

Crowell, 62, said he was “extremely humbled” by his support and promised to continue to talk about the issues in the general election he’s talked about since he announced his run in April ” an attractive downtown, regional cooperation, public safety, a strong economy and finishing the bypass.

He said his personal support of both ballot initiatives that include a sales tax increase for the V&T Railway project and a property tax increase for the sheriff and fire departments won’t stop him for respecting the decision of voters in November.

“At the end of the day, it’s really a community decision,” said Crowell, who works as a lobbyist for the law firm Kummer Kaempfer Bonner Renshaw & Ferrario.

Haskins, known as the “Rockin’ Rev” for his years as a rock radio host, said he campaigned hard to win the primary and will have to fight hard to win the general election Nov. 4 against Crowell.

“He’s obviously the front-runner and I’m the underdog,” said Haskins, 54. “I’m going to give it the best shot I can.”

The pastor has run a campaign promising responsiveness to concerns of voters and fiscal conservatism. He said he respects Crowell, but they clearly disagree on taxes as shown by his opposition to the two ballot questions and Crowell’s support for them.

Lehmann said he will not endorse either candidate.

“I think on a cost-per-vote basis, we did very well,” he said, referring to himself.

Following Lehmann, Pete Hansell got about 7 percent of the vote, Jim Shirk got about 4 percent and Steve McClung, though popular at debates, got about 3 percent.

The results of the primary don’t speak well for Carson City, Hansell said.

“We just are obviously going to get the same-old, same-old,” he said.

Mayor Marv Teixeira is not seeking a fourth term.

– Contact reporter Dave Frank at dfrank@nevadaappeal.com or 881-1212.

Lehmann said he will not endorse either candidate.

“I think on a cost-per-vote basis, we did very well,” he said, referring to himself.

Following Lehmann, Pete Hansell got about 7 percent of the vote, Jim Shirk got about 4 percent and Steve McClung, though popular at debates, got about 3 percent.

The results of the primary don’t speak well for Carson City, Hansell said.

“We just are obviously going to get the same-old, same-old,” he said.

Mayor Marv Teixeira is not seeking a fourth term.

– Contact reporter Dave Frank at dfrank@nevadaappeal.com or 881-1212.

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