Parade brings in the crowds | NevadaAppeal.com

Parade brings in the crowds

Dave Frank
Nevada Appeal Staff Writer

BRAD HORN/Nevada Appeal

Larry McPherson said Saturday sitting in the back of a National Guard truck in front of a microphone that he’s learned over 12 years as an announcer at the Nevada Day Parade that it’s important to be careful to give everyone credit and never to insult anyone in the parade.

Navy airplanes flew above Carson Street a minute later to signal the start of the parade that morning.

“Well, there you go,” the Lyon County commissioner said into the microphone at the corner of Fourth and Carson streets. “Your tax dollars at work.”

The parade of 200 entries then started with bands, businesses, military and politicians marching or riding through the light rain for three and a half hours, waving at the hundreds of people who came to celebrate the observance of the state holiday.

Grand Marshal Kathryn Crosby smiled at the crowd from a convertible, Carson City Mayor Marv Teixeira rode in a golf cart with his bulldog, Republican Party members in red shirts chanted “U.S.A.!” and supporters of Democratic candidate for U.S. Congress Jill Derby sang a rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” changing lyrics to things like “and it’s one, two, three strikes she’s in.”

Local, state and U.S. campaigns also walked the crowded sidewalks along Carson Street. Many wore stickers for presidential candidates John McCain or Barack Obama. Others cheered and heckled politicians. Supporters gave out merchandise, including a Magic Grip jar opener stamped with the Carson City mayor candidate’s Bob Crowell’s name.

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Others were at the parade on business.

Connie Clem sold inflatable Spiderman dolls and other merchandise like cowboy hats and plastic horns.

Clem said the horns were the most popular at the parade, because, “if you’re a kid, anything noisy.”

Mark Schmidt of Carson City Jewelry & Loan gave out Nevada Day balloons by his store like he’s done at the parade since 1984.

He said he expected to give out 1,500 that day and hoped that goal wouldn’t be a problem.

“If you can’t sell a free balloon, you’re not a good salesman,” he said.

Gary McElroy and Chuck Dalton in a car labeled Poop Patrol were also busy following the Alliance of Wild Horse Advocates, which included both activists and horses.

The two men got out of the car whenever the parade stopped, McElroy with a golf club and Dalton with a shovel.

When asked how their job was going, they laughed.

“It’s like crap,” McElroy said.

“It’s started slow,” Dalton said, “but it’s picking up.”

– Contact reporter Dave Frank at dfrank@nevadaappeal.com or 881-1212.

Navy airplanes flew above Carson Street a minute later to signal the start of the parade that morning.

“Well, there you go,” the Lyon County commissioner said into the microphone at the corner of Fourth and Carson streets. “Your tax dollars at work.”

The parade of 200 entries then started with bands, businesses, military and politicians marching or riding through the light rain for three and a half hours, waving at the hundreds of people who came to celebrate the observance of the state holiday.

Grand Marshal Kathryn Crosby smiled at the crowd from a convertible, Carson City Mayor Marv Teixeira rode in a golf cart with his bulldog, Republican Party members in red shirts chanted “U.S.A.!” and supporters of Democratic candidate for U.S. Congress Jill Derby sang a rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” changing lyrics to things like “and it’s one, two, three strikes she’s in.”

Local, state and U.S. campaigns also walked the crowded sidewalks along Carson Street. Many wore stickers for presidential candidates John McCain or Barack Obama. Others cheered and heckled politicians. Supporters gave out merchandise, including a Magic Grip jar opener stamped with the Carson City mayor candidate’s Bob Crowell’s name.

Others were at the parade on business.

Connie Clem sold inflatable Spiderman dolls and other merchandise like cowboy hats and plastic horns.

Clem said the horns were the most popular at the parade, because, “if you’re a kid, anything noisy.”

Mark Schmidt of Carson City Jewelry & Loan gave out Nevada Day balloons by his store like he’s done at the parade since 1984.

He said he expected to give out 1,500 that day and hoped that goal wouldn’t be a problem.

“If you can’t sell a free balloon, you’re not a good salesman,” he said.

Gary McElroy and Chuck Dalton in a car labeled Poop Patrol were also busy following the Alliance of Wild Horse Advocates, which included both activists and horses.

The two men got out of the car whenever the parade stopped, McElroy with a golf club and Dalton with a shovel.

When asked how their job was going, they laughed.

“It’s like crap,” McElroy said.

“It’s started slow,” Dalton said, “but it’s picking up.”

– Contact reporter Dave Frank at dfrank@nevadaappeal.com or 881-1212.

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