The Popcorn Stand: Even Declaration of Independence is controversial | NevadaAppeal.com

The Popcorn Stand: Even Declaration of Independence is controversial

This is the end of civilization.

Or maybe it isn't.

National Public Radio every year presents the Declaration of Independence word for word on Independence Day and for the first time, NPR decided to provide the entire Declaration of Independence on Twitter.

Granted, of course, NPR had to present the Declaration of Independence one sentence at a time on Twitter as opposed to just presenting the entire document on say one page in say a — newspaper.

But portions of the sentences from the Declaration of Independence tweeted out by NPR did cause an uproar such as "A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people."

And this one also caused trouble "and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation."

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It seems Donald Trump supporters didn't take too kindly to these lines thinking these tweets were an attack on Trump by NPR.

Again, full disclosure, never cared for Donald Trump as a person, pretty ambivalent about him as a president — for now.

But not to be outdone, those who don't support Trump thanked NPR for pointing out what kind of president we have.

But evidently this isn't the end of civilization as there were those who actually recognized these were indeed the words of the Declaration of Independence and pointed out the folly of both sides.

If you read the entire Declaration of Independence and I suggest you do and you can do it here http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/, you'll find the majority of the document deals with not wanting to have a king, which kind of explains why this nation didn't have a president for like 13 years.

Next year I'm suggesting the Nevada Appeal — and every newspaper in the country — set aside one page to feature the entire Declaration of Independence in their newspapers. Not on Facebook. Or Twitter. Or whatever social media. In our newspaper.

Our civilization may depend on it.

— Charles Whisnand

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