Stats: 3A Girls’ Golf | NevadaAppeal.com

Stats: 3A Girls’ Golf

staff reports at Desert Lakes, Fernley Team Scores Truckee 472-483-955 Boulder City 496-472-968 Pahrump 494-497-991 Fernley 519-490-1009 Incline 533-482-1015 N. Tahoe 530-496-1026 Manogue 545-527-1072 Virgin Valley 628-565-1193 Individual scores Jones (NT) 87-81-168 Trudeau (Tru) 83-86-169 Harter (Tru) 82-95-177 Gillig (BC) 89-91-180 McDonald (BC) 91-90-181 Hopkins (P) 87-94-181 Oberly (I) 97-85-182 Grace (BC) 98-85-183 Mays (Spring Creek) 90-95-185 Eilrich (F) 99-86-185 Jandebuer (F) 97-91-188 Apadoca (P) 94-99-193 Jurey (Wells) 98-95-193 Raner (P) 96-101-197 Milani (NT) 100-100-200 DeCarlo (T) 102-98-200 Thomas (F) 99-102-201 Ayers (SC) 102-100-202 Turner (V) 99-104-203 Davis (T) 105-98-203 Ziamowski (I) 105-99-204 Hills (I) 109-95-204 Waller (T) 100-106-206 Cross (P) 103-104-207 Ellsworth (I) 107-100-207 Harless (Battle Mountain) 106-102-108 Feinberg (M) 105-105-210 Williams (BC) 108-102-210 Spencer (BM) 112-98-210 Elston (M) 106-105-211 H. Dillon (M) 113-99-212 Nilson (P) 114-99-213 Harrison (BC) 110-104-214 Adams (NT) 111-103-214 Stewart (M) 112-104-216 Reeder (F) 110-108-218 Connors (I) 115-103-218 Gonzales (F) 114-107-221 Hordswick (Whittel) 118-103-218 Strachan (BC) 117-105-222 Inman (Hawthorne) 119-104-223 Whittlinger (NT) 120-105-225 Leming (Moapa) 119-108-227 Hagan (I) 120-109-229 Dodd (V) 123-106-229 Hendryx (Round Mtn.) 118-113-231 Harlow (NT) 125-107-232 Kirk (F) 128-104-232 Calvanese (M) 109-124-233 Washington (P) 114-119-233 Giomi (Yerington) 115-118-233 Leonard (Mo) 121-113-234 Partridge (NT) 112-128-240 Robertson (Yer) 118-123-241 Fair (White Pine) 120-124-244 Walstrom (T) 128-119-247 Schearer (V) 130-117-247 Hermann (WP) 129-124-253 C. Dillon (M) 140-114-254 Faught (V) 131-125-256 Skog (Dayton) 131-127-258 Milachowski (V) 145-132-277 Frehner (V) 164-113-277

3A Girls Golf State Championships

Desert Lakes, Fernley Team results: Truckee 472, Pahrump 494, Boulder City 496, Fernley 519, N. Tahoe 530, Incline 533, Manogue 545, Virgin Valley Individual results: Harter (T) 82, Trudeau (T) 83, Jones (NT) 87, Hopkins (P) 87, Gillig (BC) 89, Mays (Spring Creek) 90, McDonald (BC) 91, Apadoca (P) 94, Raner (P) 96, Janderbuer (F) 97, Oberly (I) 97, Jurey (Wells) 98, Grace (BC) 98, Ellrich (F) 99, Thomas (F) 99, Turner (V) 99, Waller (T) 100, Milani (NT) 100, Ayers (SC) 102, DeCarlo (T) 102, Cross (P) 103, Davis (T) 105, Feinberg (M) 105, Ziamowski (I) 105, Harless (Battle Mountain) 106, Elston (M) 106, Ellsworth (I) 107, Williams (BC) 108, Calvanese (M) 109, Hills (I) 109, Reeder (F) 110, Harrison (BC) 110, Adams (NT) 111, Partridge (NT) 112, Spencer (BM) 112, Stewart (M) 112, Dillon (M) 113, Washington (P) 114, Nilson (P) 114, Gonzales (F) 114, Giomi (Yer) 115, Connors (I) 115, Strachan (BC) 117, Hordswick (Whittel) 118, Leming (Moapa) 119, Inman (Hawthorne) 119, Fair (White Pine) 120, Whittlinger (NT) 120, Hagan (I) 120, Leonard (Moa) 121, Dodd (V) 123, Harlow (NT) 125, Walstrom (T) 128, Hermann (WP) 129, Schearer (V) 130, Skog (Day) 131, Faught (V) 131, Dillon (M) 140, Milachowski (V) 145, Frehner (V) 164

1999 U.S. Bank/NIAA GIrls Golf

STATE Championships Canyon Gate Country Club, Las Vegas Team standings Green Valley 393-401-794 Bishop Gorman 435-430-865 Durango 438-447-885 Galena 481-462-943 Reno 479-499-978 Palo Verde 519-504-1023 Wooster 524-505-1029 Carson 553-532-1085 Individual standings C. Fernandez (GV) 73-80-153 M. Fernandez (GV) 78-75-153 Kindig (GV) 75-79-154 Gill (Gal) 77-77-154 Auten (Bonanza) 79-76-155 Reilly (BG) 79-76-155 Welch (Dur) 78-78-156 De’Ath (GV) 80-78-158 Andrews (Dur) 75-84-159 Chappell (Churchill County) 78-81-159 Monteiro (Bon) 82-80-162 Hentzner (BG) 83-80-163 Faber (Dur) 84-83-167 Oliver (Hug) 83-86-169 Webb (BG) 82-90-172 Detomasi (CC) 83-90-173 Lee (Silverado) 85-91-176 Folosine (Reno) 84-93-177 Miranda (Cimarron) 87-90-177 Baxter (Car) 91-88-179 Dionne (GV) 87-92-179 Wallin (BG) 91-88-179 A. Nelson (Woo) 93-87-180 Cohen (GV) 96-89-185 Ely (Gal) 93-92-185 Nunn (Reno) 88-98-186 Butts (SLT) 93-96-189 Schlosser (Gal) 104-87-191 K. Nelson (Woo) 96-98-194 Maynes (Silverado) 100-95-195 Bartmus (Dur) 100-96-196 Henderson (PV) 98-98-196 Glenn (Reno) 98-100-198 Mark (BG) 100-98-198 Van Cleve (BG) 102-96-198 Hecker (PV) 103-96-199 Hird (Reno) 97-104-201 Sherba (PV) 102-99-201 Canepa (Gal) 102-100-202 Sutton (Dur) 101-106-207 Johnson (Woo) 105-104-209 Boyle (Reed) 108-103-211 Cassell (PV) 106-105-211 Ellis (Gal) 104-106-211 DeLucia (Dur) 102-112-214 Fitzhenry (Car) 112-108-220 Yeaton (PV) 114-106-220 Maupin (Reno) 117-104-221 Cipriano (Gal) 114-108-222 Picollo (Woo) 114-109-223 K. Teixera (Woo) 116-107-223 McCoy (PV) 110-115-225 Heinen (Reno) 112-117-229 Liveratti (Car) 117-113-230 Mulvane (Car) 121-110-231 Borst (Car) 112-124-236 Upton (Car) 124-113-237 T. Teixeira (Woo) 117-126-243

Living in Carson City proves costly

The cost of living in Carson City was 11.4 percent above the national average last quarter and higher than in Reno/Sparks, Las Vegas or Elko, the other Nevada areas in a nationwide survey. In local cost of living has steadily increased for Carson City since the survey was first taken here a decade ago, but that is not inhibiting business or people from coming here, according to Larry Osborne, executive vice president of the Carson City Area Chamber of Commerce. “It’s the areas where the cost of living is 10 or 20 percent below the national average that raise concerns,” Osborne said Saturday. “People look at that and say, ‘What’s missing there?’” Many of the more desireable places to live and work, such as Boulder, Colo., have high costs of livng than average, Osborne said. And businesses continue to open in or relocate to Carson City, even as housing availability has become tighter and some prices have risen, Osborne said. Osborne pointed out that Carson City costs for housing are lower in Reno/Sparks, for utilities are lower than in Elko and for transportation and health care are lower than in Las Vegas. He also noted that transportation costs documented in the survey are substantially higher for western cities than the rest of the country. He attributed much of that to the price of gasoline in the West. “We have a lot of tourists coming in buying gas, long distances to drive, other market factors that affect gas prices,” he said. The quarterly report is based on a survey of 59 basic items such as groceries, clothing, rents and utilities and is collected by Chambers of Commerce or similar organizations in 310 areas throughout the country. The report does not itself document cost of living changes from year to year, but Osborne said Carson City’s index was in the mid- to high-90s a decade ago. He cited some examples of changed costs in that period. An 1,800-square-foot home on an 8,000-square-foot lot in Carson City was $116,128 a decade ago, but averages $160,040 now. The price of a day in a semi-private hospital room here increased from $290 to $505. And a T-bone steak that went for $4.012 a pound in 1989 is about $6.31 a pound these days. The Carson chamber gathers the information for the quarterly survey by ACCRA and published the results in its November newsletter. Osborne, a past president of ACCRA, said the organization formerly was known as the American Chamber of Commerce Research Association, but dropped its name to just its acronym because a number of members area economic development organizations and other non-chamber groups. The ACCRA cost of living index was named one of the “best sources of marketing information” in 1995 by American Demographics magazine. Text box–survey info Composite Index Grocery Items Housing Utilities Transportation Health Care Misc. Goods and Services Carson City 111.4 116.8 110.5 103.5 126.7 121.8 105.3 Reno/Sparks 109.5 109.0 117.4 94.9 124.3 122.7 100.2 Las Vegas 106.6 115.1 96.8 87.0 131.8 125.1 105.1 Elko 106.4 112.5 98.3 113.9 107.8 121.1 105.8 Sacramento 113.1 120.0 107.8 116.0 131.8 144.6 103.0

Mayweather Jr. wins tough fight

LAS VEGAS — Marcos Maidana did everything but beat Floyd Mayweather Jr., taking him 12 tough rounds before losing a majority decision. Mayweather remained unbeaten Saturday night, but not by much. Maidana swarmed all over him from the opening bell and gave him perhaps his toughest fight in a 16-year professional career. In the end, though, Mayweather got the win — just as he did in his previous 45 fights. He retained his welterweight title by winning 117-111 on one scorecard and 116-112 on another. A third judge had it even at 114-114. The Associated Press scored it for Mayweather 115-113. Maidana threw far more punches, but Mayweather was more accurate with his as the two battled into the late rounds with the fight still very much in doubt. Cheered on by a large contingent of Argentine fans, Maidana took the fight to Mayweather, who was cut by the right eye in the fourth round by an accidental head butt. "It was a tough, competitive fight," Mayweather said. "I normally like to go out there and box and move. But he put pressure on me. I wanted to give the fans what they wanted to see so I stood and fought him." Maidana raised his arms in victory when the final bell sounded, and Mayweather watched pensively from his corner as the scorecards were added up.

Nevada Day Parade line-up

Nevada Day Parade Division One 1 -American Legion 2 -Elko High School Marching Band 3 -Carson City Sheriff Mounted Unit 4 -Carson City Sheriff’s Office 5 -Washoe County Sheriff 5 -Nevada Highway Patrol 6 -Douglas County Sheriff Mounted Posse 7 -Nevada Indian Commission 8 -Nevada Day Poster Contest Winners 9 -U. S. Senators Harry Reid and John Ensign 10 -U. S. Congressman Jim Gibbons 11 -Governor Kenny and Mrs. Dema Guinn 12 -Lt. Governor Lorraine Hunt 13 -State Treasurer Brian Krolicki 14 -Secretary of State Dean Heller 15 -State Controller Kathy Augustine 16 -Chief Justice Bill Maupin 17 -Justices of the Supreme Court 18 – Southern Paiute Tribe-color guard 19 – Walker River Paiute Tribe-Li’l Miss Pinenut 20 – Walker River Paiute Tribe-Miss Walker River Division 2 21 -Douglas High School Drill Team 22 -Douglas High School Band 23 -Douglas High School Flag Team 24 -Native American Elders of the 19th Century 25 -Reno-Sparks Indian Colony 26 -Reno-Sparks Indian Colony 27 – Miss Pyramid Lake-Kathleen Bryan 28 -Mercedes Melendez Ramirez, Kona & Lowellen Jackson 29 -Toi-Tukado: Cattail Eaters of the Stillwater Marshes 30 -Yerington Paiute Tribe 31 -Western Shoshone Nation 32 -Western Shoshone Nation 33 -Great Basin Native Basketweaver Assoc. 34 -Summit Lake Paiute Tribe 35 -Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe 36 -Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe 37 -Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Division 3 38 -South Tahoe High School JROTC Color Guard 39 -South Tahoe High School JROTC Drill Team 40 -Carson Middle School Band 41 -Boys & Girls Clubs of Western Nevada 42 -Linda Crosthwaite 43 -Ronnie Johnson Family of Clowns 44 -Washoe Tribal Police Department 44 -Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California 45 -Washoe Housing Authority/Washoe Tribe 46 -Douglas County Sheriff DARE and GREAT 47 -Rite of Passage 48 -Miss Pahrump 49 -Great Basin Fjords 50 -Nevada State Fire Marshal 51 -Daughters of Norway 52 -Northern Nevada Homeschoolers 53 -Bretta Sue Reese 54 -Sierra Inline Hockey League 55 -Betty Young Rau Division 4 56 -Lyon County Sheriff’s Dept. Color Guard 57 -Dayton High School Marching Band 58 -Dayton High School Flag Team 59 -Girl Scouts of the Sierra Nevada 60 -Girl Scouts of the Sierra Nevada 61 -Capital Christian Center’s Children’s Ministry 62 -Nevada Senior Softball 63 -Silver Springs Chamber of Commerce 64 -Miss Rodeo Nevada 65 -Reno Rodeo Association 66 -Red Hat Society 67 -Ronald McDonald 68 -Gordon Bourne & Ken Furlong 69 -Miss Nevada 70 -Miss Winnemucca & Miss Humboldt County 71 -Grandpa & His Shadow 72 -Brian Sandoval 73 -Carson City Veterans’ Group Division 5 74 -Incline Village High School JROTC Color Guard 75 -Incline Village High School JROTC Drill Team 76 -Incline Village High School Top Gun Battalion 77 -Incline Village High School Marching Band 78 -Little Miss North America-Amber Harper 79 -Nevada Committee for Full Statehood 80 -Nevada Women’s History Project 81 -Bob Guimont & Carson City Sheriff’s Protective Assoc. 82 -100 Years of Ford 83 -Sparks Little Theater 84 -Division of Child and Family Services 85 -Redd Barney Ranch 86 -Calvary Chapel 87 -Piper’s Opera House 1864 Governor’s Ball 88 -ICDA Performing Arts 89 -Carson Tiger Sharks 90 -Chorus of the Comstock Division 6 91 -Wooster Colt Battalion 92 -Reno High School Band 93 -Miss Nevada Teen American 94 -Nevada 4-H 95 -Western Nevada Performing Arts 96 -Sierra Rottweiler Owners 97 -MADD 98 -Sierra Nevada Junior Rodeo Club 99 -Cinderella Scholarship 100 -Memorial to World War II Killed in Action 101 -Northern Nevada Sikh 102 -Cub Scout Pack 143 103 -Senior National Finals Rodeo 104 -Dayton Chamber of Commerce 105 -Potter’s House 106 -Korean War Veteran’s Association 107 -Reno High School ROTC Huskie Battalion Division 7 108 -Eagle Valley Middle School Drill Team 109 -Eagle Valley Middle School Band 110 -Carson City Elks 111 -National Pony Express 112 -AARP 113 -Pearl Harbor Survivor’s Assoc. 114 -U. S. Coast Guard and Auxiliary 115 -Warm Springs Riders 116 -Pet Network 117 -Nevada Civil War Volunteers 118 -Girl Scouts Troop 152 119 -Soroptimist International of Carson City 120 -Wells Fargo Bank 121 -Portuguese Pioneers 122 -Baha’I Faith 123 -Nevada Buggy Buddies 124 -Carson City Host Lions 125 -E. Clampus Vitus 126-2002 Beggin’ Strips A-mazin’ Bacon Races 127 -Sparks Assembly Rainbow for Girls Division 8 128 -White Pine High School Band 129 -White Pine High School Flag Team 130 – Navy League of the United States 131 -Pyramid Lake Fisheries 132 -Woodford’s Youth Opportunity Movement 133 -Sierra Sage Riders 134 -Hilltop Community Church 135 -Make-A-Wish Foundation 136 -Fallon High School Rodeo Queen 137 -Widders of Nevada 138 -SNEA 139 -Robbie’s F Troop 140 -Bonanza Casino 141 -Sierra Nevada Academy 142 -Sons & Daughters of Erin 143 -Sierra Highlanders Pipe Band 144 -Nevada Society of Scottish Clans 145 -GBPCA’s AmeriCorps 146 -Capital City Humane Society 147 -Republican Women Division 9 148 -Reed NJROTC Color Guard 149 -Reed NJROTC Raider Battalion 150 -Reed NJROTC Armed Drill Team 151 -Home Street Drill Team 152 -Home Street Middle School 153 -Home Street Tall Flags & Rifles 154 -Coldwell Banker Village 155 -Nevada Physical Therapy 156 -Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield 157 -Arundel Auction 158 -Virginia Range Wildlife Protection Assoc. 159 -Computer Corps 160 -KBUL Converta-Bull 161 -Sparkie the Clown 162 -Kerak Shrine 163 -Hillah Shriners Motor Patrol 164 -Les Schwab 165 -Lyon County Sheriff’s Rescue 166 -Mix95.5 Division 10 167 -Carson High School NJROTC Color Guard 168 -Carson High School NJROTC Drill Team 169 -Carson High School “Blue Thunder” Band 170 -Nevada Office of Traffic Safety 171 -BLM 172 -Nevada Division of Forestry 173 -Warren Engine Company No. 1 174 -Exotic Car Audio 175 -Firematic 176 -Citizen Alert 177 -Champion Motor Speedway 178 -Nevada Army National Guard 179 -Devil Mountain Brigade 180 -Superior Tow & Transport

Locals strong in state golf

Galena’s Luxchmi Gill and Shandra Cipriano, Douglas High’s Lindsey Knox and Carson Ciarra Christian were among the top local golfers at the NIAA/U.S. Bank 4A State Golf Championships on Thursday. Gill finished 10th in the state as she shot 82 in both of her rounds to finish at 164 at the Black Mountain Golf and Country Club in Henderson. Cipriano finished with a 186 (94-92), Knox finished with a 187 (89-98) and Christian finished with a 192 (96-96). In the teams standings, Galena placed sixth with a 937 (472-465) while Carson’s young team finished ninth out of nine schools with a 1,057 (543-514). Durango won the state title with an 803 (399-404). Other finishes for Carson were: Ashley Faber, 210 (110-100); Elizabeth Rankl, 210 (110-100); Lindsay Farnworth, 221 (114-107); Gabrielle Gallegos, 224 (113-111); and Mandy Carvin, 238 (117-121). Other finishes for Galena were: Ardea Canepa, 193 (95-98); Merideth Holmes, 194 (99-95); Michelle Bick, 200 (102, 98); and Jessica Ruppert, 220 (111-109). Christine Fernandez won the state title with a 4-under-par 142 (73-69). 3A GOLF Yerington was in sixth place after the first round of play in the State 3A girls golf tournament. The Lions shot a 596. Lowry was in first with a 487. Fernley’s Nicole Johnson was the top local golfer as she is in 16th after shooting a 108. Swecker MacKenzie was in first with an 84. Other locals’ scores were: Shawn Skog, Dayton, 111; Chelsea Arrighi, Yerington, 111; Katie Christensen, Yerington, 116; Lara Smith, Yerington, 120; Heather Sam, Yerington, 121; Mallory Frazier, Yerington, 128; Jessica Smith, Yerington, 131; Lindsay Craig, Fernley, 131.

Malozemoff pours first gold at Carlin mine

Elko Daily Free Press May 27, 1965 Plato Malozemoff, president of the Newmont Mining Corporation, this morning personally directed pouring of the first ingots of full-production gold at the Carlin Gold Mine, as dignitaries from Elko, Nevada, the federal government, Newmont, and other affiliated interests, observed. Newsmen from leading journals throughout the nation were also on hand. At a press briefing last night at the Stockmen's Motor Hotel, Malozemoff revealed the hitherto secret fact that the Carlin Gold Mine ore is averaging 0.32 ounces of gold to the ton, or $11 per ton. Production will claim more than 90 per cent of the gold in the ore. Robert Fulton, vice president of Newmont, said the orebody has so far been mapped out to contain 11 million tons of ore; or enough to keep the mine and mill operating at its 2,000 ton per day capacity for just less than 15 years. Beyond that, mapping is not complete, although Fulton said the end of the orebody has not yet been found. Newmont's operation is the first major gold strike to be made in the past 35 years. Malozemoff noted that, 35 years ago, the operation would have required three times the men it does today, because of advances since then in mechanization. The Carlin Gold Mine, with about 76 employes, will produce about one-seventh the annual U.S. gold production with 200,000 ounces, coming from the mill. Only the Homestake mine at Lead, S.D., produces more, at 500,000 ounces per year. Two Canadian mines are larger making Carlin the fourth largest in North America. Fulton said his studies of the orebody reveal it dates back to the Paleozoic age for formation of the host rock. The gold itself dates to the Terciary period of the earth's development. He noted there is a remarkable association of barite in the ore, and said it is their hunch that the two mineral are not too far apart in age. Frank McQuiston, Newmont vice president and designer of the Carlin operation, said the gold is in siltstone — "mud when its wet," but the recovery of gold through cyanidization is hampered by the slime formation. Special filtration and floculation systems were designed, including radioactive systems, to clear the solution so the gold could be precipitated out. McQuistion noted that Carlin is the only cold-climate operation using outdoor thickener tanks and the first of its size to be constructed in as short a time as ten months. Construction began before the drawings were complete, McQuiston said, with the Bechtel Corporation in charge of mill construction. Bob Hernlund, vice president of Newmont who headed up the engineering, said several unique problems in gold mining were presented by the ore, and unique solutions were found. The gold is so fine, it can only be seen under 1,800 power magnification, and then only the larger particles are photographable. These "larger" particles are two millionths of a square inch in size, he said. In order to successfully assay the ore, Newmont had to adapt the Australian system of atomic absorption spectrophy, the only North American operation using this system. Fire assaying by methods over a hundred years old were not satisfactory for extremely fine, low grade ore. Bob Denny, Newmont vice president in charge of engineering for automation and mechanization, said the plant was designed with three control points. Radiation from cesium is used for control throughout the plant, he said, with little or no danger to workmen from the radioactivity present because of shielding. All critical items were started up for production on the automatic setup, with no manual beginnings, so that there would be no possibilities of error or failure showing up later, he said. Fulton noted that Isbell Construction Company, holders of the original stripping contract, removed 2.5 million tons of earth prior to the start of the operation. Howard and Crawford is now continuing the overburden stripping. A 3 1/2-yard electric shovel loads the dump trucks with ore or overburden, which then moves to its proper destination. Malozemoff said the mill represents a $6 million investment, the tailings dam another $1 million, and the overburden removal prior to operation another $3 million, for a total investment of $10 million before the first ingot was poured early this month during the shake-down period. Newmont footed the investment alone, with no loans, stock promotion, or other methods, and will recover the investment in the first five years of operation, Malozemoff noted.

Lineup for Saturday’s Nevada Day Parade

DIVISION 1 – BATH STREET1 Carson City Sheriff’s Office 2 The Nevada Highway Patrol 3 Grand Marshals 4 U.S. Navy Sea Cadet Core — Fallon Division5,6 White Pine High Band and Color Guard 7 White Pine Middle School Band 8 NV National Guard Honor Guard 9 Nevada National Guard 10 Gov. Brian Sandoval 11 United States Coast Guard and Auxiliary 12 Heller for Senate 13 U.S. Rep. Mark Amodei, Nevada 2nd Congressional District 14 Shelley Berkley for Senate Salutes Nevada’s Military Families 15 Lt. Gov. Brian K. Krolicki 16 Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto and state Controller Kim Wallin 17 Secretary of State Ross Miller 18 Committee to Elect Scott Freeman for Judge 19 State Sen. Ben Kieckhefer 19A Nevada state Sen. James Settelmeyer 20 Assemblyman Pete Livermore 20A KTVN 20B K-BUL DIVISION 2 – ADALINE STREET21-22 UNR Wolf Pack Marching Band 23 Mayor Bob Crowell 24-26 Huskie Battalion 27 Red Shirt Walkers, Gold Star Families, Blue Star Moms 28 Wayne Fazzino for East Fork Township Justice of the Peace 29 Matt Williams Athletic Fundraiser 30 Carson City Rendezvous 31 1st Nevada Cavalry, 173 years of U.S. Cavalrymen from Chapoltepac to Afghanistan 32 Crowns with Honor 33 A Pepper In Honor of Those Who Serve 34 Alliance of Wild Horse Advocates 35 Pack 143 36 A Salute To M.A.S.H. 4077 37 Reno Mustang Car Club 38 Our Veterans of Past Wars 39 Virginia City Living Legends 40 Battle Born Bomber Girls 40A Downtown Coin Dogs DIVISION 3 – EAST LONG STREET41 Pau-Wa-Lu Middle School Panther Band 42 Damonte Ranch High Mustangs Battalion NJROTC 43 Sparkie the Clown 44 U.S.S. Nevada Ship 45 Battle Born Civil War Re-enactors 46 Minden Heroes 47 American Legion High Desert Post 56 Color Guard 48 Ms. Sr. Golden Years USA 2012 & Queens Court 48A Miss Pahrump 2012 Sabrina Maugan & her court 49 Parading Arabians 50 Michael Bell for Justice of the Peace 51 Battle Born Food Truck 52 Cub Scout Pack 341 53 Taking Care of Past Time to Treasure All Times 54 Bretta Sue Reese 55 Sierra Nevada Classic Thunderbirds 56 Preparing Students for Today, Tomorrow and Eternity! 57 Reno Rodeo 58 Bonanza Casino 59 British Are Coming 60 VVA #388 Carson City 60A KNPB DIVISION 4 – WEST LONG STREET61, 62 Dayton High Dustdevil Marching Band 63, 64 Reed HS Navy JROTC 65 Dayton Girl Scouts 66 American Family Insurance 67 Food For Thought Carson City 68 Model A’s 69 Big Dogs & MINI Coopers 70 Silver Oak Golf 717R Arabians 72 Judge Tom Armstrong Salutes our Military 73 Sons & Daughters of Erin 74 Miss Liberty 75 Sagebrush Studebakers 76 Rodeo Tradition Lives in Nevada 77 National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution 78 The Dirty Sardine 79 Celebrating 40 Years 80 Eagle Valley Cheerleaders DIVISION 5 – EAST ADAMS STREET81 Eagle Valley Middle School Band 82-83 Lancer Battalion 84 Fire Engine and Smokey Bear 85 Democrats Proudly Salute Military Families 86 Korean War Veterans Association Northern Nevada Chapter #198 87 Friend of Youth 88 Steam Punk 89 Silver Dollar Car Classic Cars 90 Reno Aces Baseball 91 Iwo Jima Tribute 92 Miss Winnemucca High Desert Rodeo Queens 93 Carlin Camp 25, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War 94 Bordewich-Bray PTA Salutes You 95 Reno Off-Road & Motorsports Expo 2013 96 Positive Energy 97 Disabled American Veterans, Still Serving 98 Nautilus 99 Dancing in Tribute to our Heroes 100 FIRST Robotics School Teams of No. Nevada DIVISION 6 – WEST ADAMS STREET101 City of Reno Police Dept Honor Guard 101/2 Pride of The Carson Valley 103/4 JROTC Color Guard and Marching Unit 105 DeBug Computer Inc.106 Republicans Supporting Our Military & America 107 Dayton Girl Scouts 108 Corvina Base (Reno, Nevada) 109 Keeping Our Kids Safe 109A Incline High School JROTC Color Guard 110 2012-13 Sacred Visions Tiny Tot Princess 111 Romney for President 112 Nevada Rainbow Girls 113 Carson Bulldog Wrestling Club 114 Miss Indian Nations 2012-2013 115 Boys & Girls Clubs of Western Nevada 116 Hillah (Shriners) Motor Patrol 117 Aahmes Shrine Clowns 118 Kerak Shriners 119 Rappin Ratz 120 Sparks Greenbrae Lions Club/Cub Scout Pack 46 120A Carson City Host Lions DIVISION 7– EAST PARK STREET121/2 Dayton Intermediate “Sun Devil” Band & Flag Team 123 Mobile Outreach Vehicle 123A Renown Health Classic Ambulance 124 TA-4J Cockpit (Navy Jet Trainer) 125 Carson City Special Olympics 126 Cal-Nevada All Airborne 127 Miss Walker River, Mya Murphy; Lil Miss Pinenut, Tessa Murphy; Lil Miss Tiny Tot, Amaree Maiou Savage 128 Onward Christian Soldiers 129 Peace in Service 130 Carson Tahoe SPCA Supports National Pitbull Awareness Day 131 SPCA of Northern Nevada 132 NV Energy Employees — Serving Nevada for over100 years 133 Silver State Charter Schools 134 Reno-Sparks Indian Colony 135 National T Bucket Alliance, Nevada & California Chapter 136/7 Freedom Means… 138 Ground Bound 139 Bighorns Honor the Military 140 Girl Scouts of Carson, Dayton and Carson Valley DIVISION 8 – WEST PARK STREET141/2 Fernley Vaquero Band 143 Cub Scouts of Pinenut District 144 A Piece of Cloth — A Flag 145 Korean War Veterans Assoc. Chapter 305 Carson City 146 C.A.S.A147 A History of Public Health 148 Slaughter House Haunted House 149 Wells Fargo Stage Coach 150 Stewart Indian School — 90 Years of Supporting the Nations’s Military 151 Northern Nevada Sikh Society 152 Houndsman Honoring Service 153 Carson City BMX 154 The Colors of Character 155 The Salvation Army of Carson City 156 Combating Poverty, One family at a time — fighting for your future 157 Fruit Barons Harvest Local Fruit 158 Jr. Miss Sacred Visions Powwow Princess2012-2013 159 We Can Do It! 160 Johnson Lane Baptist Church 160A Catseye Pest Control DIVISION 9 – JOHN STREET 161 Blue Thunder Marching Band 162/3 Navy Junior ROTC Carson High 164 Green Team 165 Family Guidance and Wellness Network 166 Out of Bounds Off Road Fabrications 167 YOGO Frozen Yogurt 168 La Association De Charros del Norte de Nevada/Dancing Horses 169 Bunny Ranch 169A Wild Ass Women 170 VFW Float Post #3726 171 Committee to Elect Brad Bonkowski 172 Blasted Double Bubble 173 “The Black Hole” Carson City Raiders Booster Club 174 Carson ATA Karate for Kids 175 D’Ascoli Orthodontics 176 SAVOY6, Military Vehicle Preservation Group 177 Mountain Springs Salutes Our Military Heroes & Families 178 Controlled Burn 179 Cruising For Our Troops 180 Carson Lanes Retail Center/Johnny Rockets DIVISION 10 – FLEISCHMANN STREET181 CMS Solon Marching Band 182 Tombstone Tap and Grill 183 Clampers 184 A to Zen Presents the Dungeon 185 Reno eNVy 186 Southwest Gas 187 Sierra Shepherds 188 The Firewood Department 189 Duncan Golf Management 190 Fighters Against Child Abuse 191 The President and First Lady of the Republic of Molossia 191A Hot August Nights 192 Devil Mountain Brigade 193 Karson Kruzers 194 “WHAT” TV presents the Traveling Troubadour 195 D&S Tow Inc 195A Tumbleweeds Gynmastics 196 CARTBARN 197 Muscle Powered Brigade 198 Tom Stone 199 Northern Nevada Youth Football League 200 Sierra Place

Malozemoff pours first gold at Carlin mine

Elko Daily Free Press May 27, 1965 Plato Malozemoff, president of the Newmont Mining Corporation, this morning personally directed pouring of the first ingots of full-production gold at the Carlin Gold Mine, as dignitaries from Elko, Nevada, the federal government, Newmont, and other affiliated interests, observed. Newsmen from leading journals throughout the nation were also on hand. At a press briefing last night at the Stockmen's Motor Hotel, Malozemoff revealed the hitherto secret fact that the Carlin Gold Mine ore is averaging 0.32 ounces of gold to the ton, or $11 per ton. Production will claim more than 90 per cent of the gold in the ore. Robert Fulton, vice president of Newmont, said the orebody has so far been mapped out to contain 11 million tons of ore; or enough to keep the mine and mill operating at its 2,000 ton per day capacity for just less than 15 years. Beyond that, mapping is not complete, although Fulton said the end of the orebody has not yet been found. Newmont's operation is the first major gold strike to be made in the past 35 years. Malozemoff noted that, 35 years ago, the operation would have required three times the men it does today, because of advances since then in mechanization. The Carlin Gold Mine, with about 76 employes, will produce about one-seventh the annual U.S. gold production with 200,000 ounces, coming from the mill. Only the Homestake mine at Lead, S.D., produces more, at 500,000 ounces per year. Two Canadian mines are larger making Carlin the fourth largest in North America. Fulton said his studies of the orebody reveal it dates back to the Paleozoic age for formation of the host rock. The gold itself dates to the Terciary period of the earth's development. He noted there is a remarkable association of barite in the ore, and said it is their hunch that the two mineral are not too far apart in age. Frank McQuiston, Newmont vice president and designer of the Carlin operation, said the gold is in siltstone — "mud when its wet," but the recovery of gold through cyanidization is hampered by the slime formation. Special filtration and floculation systems were designed, including radioactive systems, to clear the solution so the gold could be precipitated out. McQuistion noted that Carlin is the only cold-climate operation using outdoor thickener tanks and the first of its size to be constructed in as short a time as ten months. Construction began before the drawings were complete, McQuiston said, with the Bechtel Corporation in charge of mill construction. Bob Hernlund, vice president of Newmont who headed up the engineering, said several unique problems in gold mining were presented by the ore, and unique solutions were found. The gold is so fine, it can only be seen under 1,800 power magnification, and then only the larger particles are photographable. These "larger" particles are two millionths of a square inch in size, he said. In order to successfully assay the ore, Newmont had to adapt the Australian system of atomic absorption spectrophy, the only North American operation using this system. Fire assaying by methods over a hundred years old were not satisfactory for extremely fine, low grade ore. Bob Denny, Newmont vice president in charge of engineering for automation and mechanization, said the plant was designed with three control points. Radiation from cesium is used for control throughout the plant, he said, with little or no danger to workmen from the radioactivity present because of shielding. All critical items were started up for production on the automatic setup, with no manual beginnings, so that there would be no possibilities of error or failure showing up later, he said. Fulton noted that Isbell Construction Company, holders of the original stripping contract, removed 2.5 million tons of earth prior to the start of the operation. Howard and Crawford is now continuing the overburden stripping. A 3 1/2-yard electric shovel loads the dump trucks with ore or overburden, which then moves to its proper destination. Malozemoff said the mill represents a $6 million investment, the tailings dam another $1 million, and the overburden removal prior to operation another $3 million, for a total investment of $10 million before the first ingot was poured early this month during the shake-down period. Newmont footed the investment alone, with no loans, stock promotion, or other methods, and will recover the investment in the first five years of operation, Malozemoff noted.