Cellist Stephen Framil to lead workshop, master class in Carson City | NevadaAppeal.com

Cellist Stephen Framil to lead workshop, master class in Carson City

The chance to learn from a top cello soloist is being offered thanks to the Carson City Symphony Association, which is holding an artist-in-residence workshop and master class with Stephen Framil from 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 22 in the band room at Carson High School, 1111 N. Saliman Road.

The renowned cello soloist is the music director and conductor of Camerata Philadelphia and artistic director of the Port City Music Festival in North Carolina. He will be in Carson City to perform as guest soloist with the Carson City Symphony on Feb. 25. The artist-in-residence event is free and open to the public.

On his visit, Framil will work with cello students from Carson City Symphony's Symphony Youth Strings program; cello students from Carson Middle School, Eagle Valley Middle School, and Carson High School orchestras; and adult cellists in the community.

To sign up for the master class, contact Brian Fox, concertmaster of the Carson City Symphony and director of orchestras for the Carson City School District, at bfox@carson.k12.nv.us. Student musicians and the public are invited to attend as observers.

To demonstrate ensemble playing, Framil and Lou Groffman, principal cellist of the Carson City Symphony and Symphony Youth Strings instructor, will perform a duet.

Framil also will give a short presentation about Cello Concerto No. 2 in E minor by Victor Herbert, which he will perform with the Carson City Symphony at the Feb. 25 performance at the Carson City Community Center. He will play excerpts from the solo cello part of the concerto and discuss its history, style, and composer.

The artist-in-residence workshop and master class is a partnership between the Carson City Symphony Association and the Carson City School District. Funding comes from a grant from the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. All participants will be given complimentary family tickets to the concert.

For information, call the symphony at 775-883-4154.

Carson City live entertainment for Feb. 14-20

Tully Green from 6 to 9 p.m. today at Bella Vita Bistro and Catering, inside the Carson Mall at 1304 S. Stewart St.; and 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8.

Dave Leather's acoustic Americana at noon today at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Ev Musselman from 6 to 9 p.m. today at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Denver Saunders at 6 p.m. today and Thursday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Brother Dan Palmer at 7 p.m. Friday at the Washoe Camp Saloon, on Eastlake Boulevard in Washoe Valley.

The John Dawson Band at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Spinz and Ren Thomas at 8 p.m. Friday at Buckaroos, 1435 Highway 395 N. in Gardnerville.

Genoa Bar's Winter Music Series offers free live rock, country, blues, funk, jazz or rockabilly music from 7 to 11 p.m. Fridays through April. The bar is at 2282 Main St., Genoa.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8, and 8 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Reckless Envy at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

The Trippin King Snakes from 8 to 11 p.m. Friday at Living the Good Life, 1480 N. Carson St.; and 9 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the second annual 3 M.C. Northern Nevada Crab Feed in Fuji Park, 601 Old Clear Creek Road. Tickets are $45 in advance; call 775-690-4018.

An open mic for all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino Thursdays and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Live music from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday at The Loft inside the Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., and guitarists from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday at the casino's Alatte Coffee and Wine Bar.

Karaoke from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St.

Stand-up comedy by Ellis Rodriguez at 8 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St. Tickets for $15 are at carsoncomedyclub.com or the casino's guest service center.

Karaoke by J&M Productions from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

Steve Lord at 6 p.m. Sunday and Monday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Canyon White at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Living the Good Life, 1480 N. Carson St.

Have an entertainment event? Send it to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com.

Recipe: Crunchy chicken thighs with zucchini by Charlie Abowd

I know this time of year I usually share a recipe appropriate for Valentine's Day. This year, I'm doing something different and invite all of you to look at this through the prism of expanding the meaning of this day of lovers to simply be a day of love that encompasses the children, too.

This recipe can be used as a way to bring your children or grandchildren into the kitchen and share the joyful process of cooking, and for this telling, I'd like to share what I did recently.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Western Nevada's Carson City site recently began a six-month teen cooking class, the first chef being Clint Jolly, Food Network's "Chopped: Restaurant Impossible Challenge" 2016 champ. Regional chefs Mark Estee, David Stern, Tommy Linnett, Josh Deri and myself were also lucky to be included.

For my presentation, I wanted to do a healthy, kid-friendly, easy-to-prepare recipe. I knew I wanted to express my love for cooking and how important cooking and sharing is. And in my mind, I wanted to prove a point the synergy of cooking and sharing with family and friends is both fun and important; that it brings an important element which is becoming lost in today's instantaneous, media-driven society.

I set out to cook a meal and show the basics of the recipe and during the process, the kids were having fun, but were also distracted by their cell phones. There was, of course, a lot of conversation going on, most of which had nothing to do with the demonstration, and I knew going in this would occur and play into part of my plan.

We plated the recipe, and the children — about 30 strong — went about dishing their plates and sitting at their tables when, lo and behold, the miracle happened!

They were eating and talking, and in fact it was a low roar punctuated by a lot of laughter, a lot of fun.

So, unexpectedly to them, I stopped them mid-bite and said, "See what I mean? Cooking and eating is fun. You're all talking to each other (their phones were down) and that's why I'm here, to show you why it is important, why I love what I do."

It gave them an expanded view of the role food plays in bringing our friends, family, people we love, together.

Congratulations to the director, the board and everyone who contributed to this wonderful asset for Carson City's children known as Boys & Girls Clubs of Western Nevada. I've been there for staged events, but for this I came in an hour early, unannounced and saw first-hand how the club lives, breathes and works. It's impressive.

Well done, Katie Leao, (chief professional officer), staff, board and every citizen who has contributed to this fine asset.

Thanks to In Plain Sight Marketing for coordinating what turned out to be an excellent, unforgettable adventure.

Crunchy Chicken Thighs with Zucchini

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Portions can be increased to serve more by adding two of each ingredient per serving.

2 boneless chicken thighs per person, skin on

3 tablespoons canola oil

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper

1 teaspoon California garlic powder

3 zucchini

1 cup cherry tomatoes, sliced in half

Directions:

Heat oil in a 10- to 12-inch non-stick skillet. Season the thighs using half of the seasonings. Place the chicken — skin side down — in the skillet and cook over medium heat four to five minutes, or until the skin turns crispy and slightly brown, making sure they don't stick to the skillet.

Cover with a lid and reduce heat to low and cook 15 minutes until the skin is crispy. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 250 degrees and after the 15 minutes, remove the chicken thighs to an oven-safe pan, leaving the cooking fat in the skillet.

Place the zucchini and tomatoes into the skillet and cook for four minutes. Add the remaining seasoning and gently toss while cooking another 10 minutes.

When done, arrange the mixture on a platter for family-style service, or plate individual servings, placing things on top, crispy side up.

Voila! I recommend serving this with a really tasty local IPA or a crisp sauvignon blanc. For the youngers, serve chilled sparkling cider.

Chef Charlie Abowd co-owns Café at Adele's with his wife Karen Abowd. His recipes are online at Charlie's Recipes, http://www.charlieabowd.com. At 1112 N. Carson St., Café at Adele's is open daily at 8 a.m. for breakfast. Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner from 5 to 9 p.m. For information or to makes reservations, call 775-882-3353, or visit adelesrestaurantandlounge.com.

‘Elvis, Marilyn and the Space Aliens’ center of Carson City talk

On Feb. 13, the Capital City Arts Initiative will present a talk by author and long-time film reviewer, Robin Holabird. Her illustrated talk, "Elvis, Marilyn, and the Space Aliens: Nevada Screen Icons," is part of CCAI's ongoing Nevada Neighbors series and will take place at 6 p.m. at the Community Development Building, 108 E. Proctor St. There will be an informal reception for Holabird preceding the event at 5:30 p.m. The presentation and reception are free, and the public is cordially invited.

Holabird has a towering profile in the Nevada film community. She's a former deputy director of the Nevada Film Office and traveled the state extensively scouting locations for films. She worked as a Nevada Film Commissioner for more than 20 years, helping producers use state locations and resources for such projects as "Love Ranch," "C.S.I.," "Sister Act," and hundreds more. She's a regular film reviewer on KUNR 88.7 FM Reno Public Radio where her reviews have aired for more than 30 years.

Holabird is a former board member of the Association of Film Commissioners International, and a former editor of the organization's Locations magazine. She's a founder and first president of the Reno Film Festival and active in other cultural groups like Sierra Arts. When not hanging out in darkened movie theaters, Robin is an outdoor enthusiast who has run the Boston Marathon six times.

In her Nevada Neighbors talk, Holabird will explore the blending of icons and Nevada, along with her personal experiences of watching movies, talking with famous people, and showing off a diverse range of stunning and iconic locations like Las Vegas, Reno, Lake Tahoe, and Area 51. She will discuss how Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, and space aliens, like the Transformers, share a surprising connection along with James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Rocky Balboa — all beloved icons who have played active roles in movie and television projects set in Nevada.

In her new book, "Elvis, Marilyn, and Space Aliens," Holabird shows how Nevada's flash, flair, and fostering of the forbidden provided magic for singers, sexpots, and strange creatures from other worlds. She also gives readers an insider's look into movie-making in Nevada by drawing on her extensive experience as a film commissioner. Holabird will share her personal take on film history and culture in her Nevada Neighbors talk.

As part of her Nevada Neighbors activities, Holabird will give her talk to art students and faculty at area high schools and at Sierra Nevada College.

The Capital City Arts Initiative is an artist-centered organization committed to the encouragement and support of artists and the arts and culture of Carson City and the surrounding region. The initiative is committed to community planning and building for the area's diverse adult and youth populations through art projects and exhibitions, live events, arts education programs, artist residencies, and online projects.

The Capital City Arts Initiative is funded in part by the Nevada Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts, City of Carson City, Nevada Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities, U.S. Bank Foundation, and John and Grace Nauman Foundation.

For information, visit CCAI's website at arts-initiative.org.

Live Celtic music by the Valerie Rose Band planned in Carson City

The music of Ireland and Scotland is coming to Carson City when the Valerie Rose Band performs at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Brewery Arts Center.

The center's Celtic music series is hosting the acoustic band featuring fiddle virtuoso Valerie Rose and her long-time Bay Area collaborator Jason Pollack.

Hearkening back to the pioneers of the Celtic folk music revival such as Clannad and Altan, Rose's arrangements of traditional Irish tunes and songs are spiced with rich harmonies and playful interchanges between voice and instruments.

Pollack, an Irish flute player from the San Francisco area, seeks to express the unique character and energy of each tune, from lively and bright to somber and dark and many shades in between. Though classically trained, Pollack found Irish music later in life and is now completely devoted to it.

Joining the duo is singer/songwriter/guitarist Kyle Alden. He has appeared on stages throughout California, Colorado, the Pacific Northwest and Ireland. His third CD, "Songs From Yeats' Bee-Loud Glade," is a collection of 13 original folk songs inspired by poems of W. B. Yeats. It was on three "Best of 2011" lists among folk music DJs. As the 2012 grand prize winner of the Y-Tunes Song Contest for his settings of W.B. Yeats' poetry, Alden performed at the Hawks Well Theater in Sligo, Ireland, in the summer of 2013. As part of the annual Celtic-Appalachian Celebration in March 2015, he joined Mick Moloney and Athena Tergis in performing a selection of the Yeats songs at Symphony Space on Broadway in New York.

The Valerie Rose Band has played some of the largest festivals in Northern California including the KVMR Celtic Festival, Dublin (Calif.) Irish Festival, Festival of the Sea (SF) and Palo Alto Art and Wine Festival.

The performance, part of the Celtic music series at the Brewery Arts Center, will be in the center's Maizie Harris Jesse Black Box Theater.

Tickets are $12 for BAC members, $15 in advance, and $20 at the door. Buy them at BreweryArts.org, or call the box office at 775-883-1976.

Upcoming performances in the series include Alan Reid, founder and member of the Battlefield Band, on March 10 and Celia Ramsay in the Fortunate Strangers on April 14.

For information about the Valerie Rose Band performance or the series, contact Gina Hill at 775-883-1976 or gina@breweryarts.org.

Carson City live entertainment for Feb. 7-13

Paul Covarelli at 6 p.m. today at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Ev Musselman from 6 to 9 p.m. today at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

Dave Leather's acoustic Americana at noon today at Comma Coffee, 312 S. Carson St.

Tully Green from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at McFadden Plaza, near Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St.

Decoy at 7 p.m. Thursday and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Diego's Umbrella, a Gypsy rock band from San Francisco, at 7 p.m. Friday at the CVIC Hall in Minden. Tickets are $22 in advance and $26 at the door. Call 775-782-8207, or go to http://www.cvartscouncil.com.

Genoa Bar's Winter Music Series offers free live rock, country, blues, funk, jazz or rockabilly music from 7 to 11 p.m. Fridays through April. The bar is at 2282 Main St., Genoa.

Live music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Bella Fiore Wines, 224 S. Carson St., Suite 8.

Southbound Train from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday at the Washoe Camp Saloon, on Eastlake Boulevard in Washoe Valley.

Hindsight at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Casino Fandango, 3800 S. Carson St.

The Trippin King Snakes from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday at Max Casino, 900 S. Carson St.

An open mic for all ages and skill levels at 7 p.m. Friday at A to Zen, 1801 N. Carson St.

The Starliters at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Gold Ranch Casino in Dayton.

Musicole at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Red Dog Saloon in Virginia City.

Live music with Terri Campillo and Craig Fletcher from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. through Saturday at Glen Eagles, 3700 N. Carson St. Campillo and Fletcher are joined by Mick Valentino Thursdays and Rocky Tatterelli on Friday and Saturday.

Live music from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday at The Loft inside the Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., and guitarists from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday at the casino's Alatte Coffee and Wine Bar.

Karaoke from 8 p.m. to midnight Saturday at the Y-Not Saloon, 152 E. Long St.

Stand-up comedy by Susan Jones at 8 p.m. Friday at the Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St. Tickets for $15 are at carsoncomedyclub.com or the casino's guest service center.

Karaoke by J&M Productions from 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Carson Nugget's Alatte Coffee & Wine Bar, 507 N. Carson St.

Canyon White at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Living the Good Life, 1480 N. Carson St.

Denver Saunders at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Carson Valley Inn in Minden.

Have an entertainment event? Send it to jmcmanus@nevadaappeal.com.

Recipe: Chicken and waffles by David Theiss

Some of my favorite dishes are often a combination of meals, like having pancakes for dinner or cold pizza for breakfast. I know, rule breaker, but I don't think any rules apply to meals anymore. Even the names of meals change with your area code; what we consider dinner here in Nevada is called supper in the Midwest. Combining traditional dinner and breakfast foods together in one meal may seem against the rules, but the sweet flavors of breakfast with the savory flavors of dinner combine perfectly.

Today's recipe is a great example of the delicious mixture of these flavors: sweet, fluffy waffles with salty, savory chicken, perfect for breakfast, lunch, or supper — I mean dinner.

Chicken and waffles has a bit of a history in the United States. This sweet and savory combination goes back to the Pennsylvania Dutch who had their own version of chicken and waffles. They started with boiled chicken and made a creamy gravy from the broth. They would then pile the chicken on the waffle and pour the gravy over the top … delicious comfort food.

In the Southern states it has become a staple on a lot of menus, and for good reason — they have some of the best recipes. Waffles in the United States were said to be introduced by the pilgrims from Holland, but Thomas Jefferson reenergized the American waffle craze with a waffle iron brought back from one of his trips to France.

In 1964, Belgium waffles were introduced to Americans at the world's fair. Made with yeast and egg whites, they were fluffier with a larger cross pattern which held all the more gravy or butter.

The American version originally made with just flour and water is now made with baking additives like baking soda to also make the waffle fluffier.

The chicken is best prepared like Southern fried chicken recipes: dredged in buttermilk, flour, and seasoning mixture to give the chicken a crispy, salty, delicious crust that pairs perfectly with the sweet, fluffy waffle and syrup. Mmmmm.

For this recipe, I'm suggesting to use boneless skinless chicken breasts for ease.

Chicken and waffles

For the chicken:

4 pieces boneless skinless chicken breast. Smaller pieces are better.

1 cup flour

2 teaspoons seasoned salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1 cup panko bread crumbs

3 eggs

2-3 cups vegetable oil

2 cups buttermilk

Directions:

First, get your chicken breast soaking in the buttermilk. In a glass bowl or Ziploc bag, combine the chicken and buttermilk; make sure to cover generously. Let soak for one hour minimum or overnight for best results.

Crack eggs into bowl and whisk. In a separate bowl, combine all the dry ingredients.

Take the chicken from the buttermilk and dredge it in the seasoned flour mixture, then dip it in the egg and back to the dry seasoned flour mixture.

Time to fry! Preheat oil to 325 degrees. Gently add the chicken to the hot oil and cook approximately 6 to 8 minutes each side until golden brown, or until a 165-degree internal temperature is reached.

Remove the chicken from the pan and place it on a paper towel to soak up the excess oil.

For the waffles:

You can work as hard as you want to make the perfect waffle batter, but the premixed waffle mixtures are good and easy to make. I suggest to use your favorite recipe and be sure to make a few extra for the next morning.

Serving suggestion:

Place a pat of butter and your favorite syrup over your hot waffle.

Place the chicken on the waffle and top it with a dusting of powdered sugar. Make sure to have a bite with all the ingredients. It's salty and sweet, great for any meal! Enjoy!

David Theiss is the owner of Butler Gourmet Meats, serving Carson City since 1973.

Carson’s Got Talent holding auditions: Regional talent show benefits Meals on Wheels Carson City

Carson's Got Talent, an evening extravaganza of regional talent, is holding auditions for the April 14 show at Forever Dance, 1851 S. Roop St., in Carson City on Sunday, Feb. 11. Check in is at 9 a.m. Auditions begin at 10 a.m.

A $500 cash prize will be awarded to the first place performing act, $250 for second place and $100 for third. Prizes will be based on judges' scores and audience votes. The judging panel will include regional celebrities along with dance, theater and performing art experts.

The show is a fundraiser for Meals on Wheels Carson City. A special trophy will be awarded to the act raising the most money for the cause. Maddie Gillott, a senior at Carson High School, is producing the show with the help of her mother, Denise Gillott, as her senior project.

"Carson's Got Talent is seeking performing acts of all kinds and all ages to really showcase the level of talent and our culture of supporting the performing arts in Carson City," Courtney Warner, executive director of the Carson City Senior Center and Meals on Wheels Carson City, said. "We are so excited to have Maddie and Denise add their expert production network to really elevate the professionalism of our show."

Warner said acts should be no longer than four minutes in duration, and performers are responsible to provide their own props and have their music on CD or iPhone. Audition videos may also be submitted online and video submissions may be made online at http://bit.ly/2FmdvTX, or drop off a thumb drive at the Carson City Senior Center, located at 911 Beverly Drive, Carson City. A $5 application fee will be collected at auditions. The application will be available at the audition or online at http://www.carsonsgottalent.com.

In addition to performers, Warner said the production is also seeking sponsors.

"We would love for the business community to embrace both our performing arts and our homebound seniors who depend on Meals on Wheels for what may be their only hot meal of the day," she said. "We welcome sponsors for printing, awards, refreshments and to help offset production costs."

Carson City Meals on Wheels provides meals for nearly 300 homebound seniors daily. In the period between Oct. 2016 through September 2017, Meals on Wheels Carson City provided more than 79,500 meals to local seniors.

For more information on auditions or sponsorships, purchase show tickets or to access the downloadable audition application form, visit http://www.carsonsgottallent.comor or email Courtney Warner, executive director of the Carson City Senior Center, at CWarner@carson.org.

Writing From Mars: Carson City hosting art exhibit by Rick Parsons

When Rick Parsons makes art, he seeks to explore automatic writing, jazz thinking, and three-dimensional forms — all while zeroing in on the environment.

The Texas native draws inspiration from his background growing up nestled between a salt marsh and chemical refineries.

His work explores the effect of environmental pollutants on the body using three materials as metaphor — clay, steel and salt. He introduced the process of automatic writing — the act of writing from the subconscious with no narrative directing the thought process — to his work. The unconventional writing process serves as inspiration for the title of his latest show, "Writing From Mars."

The display, sponsored by the Capital City Arts Initiative, is going up Friday in the CCAI Courthouse Gallery, 885 E. Musser St. CCAI will host a reception for the artist on Friday from 5 to 7 p.m.

One of several elements found in the exhibit is a physics lab book from 1922 that belonged to the artist's grandmother. The book serves as a platform for the exhibition, which also features two lab tables at the center of the gallery with a large drip painting flanking the exterior.

Elements drifting in and out of Parsons' work include clay, representing the body and biology; saltwater, which heals, preserves and destroys; and steel, representing the social and spiritual structure humans build their lives around. The clay forms are first soaked in saltwater to absorb the salt, much like the body absorbs the chemicals in its surroundings. Parsons then places the clay objects onto steel plates where the salt causes the steel to oxidize. Steel is a material that's perceived as having great strength yet can be weakened by a material as simple as salt. And herein lies the irony of the sculpture: The same material that's used as the healing agent is also the catalyst for destruction. In the center of the gallery between the two lab tables sits a large Buddha on a dining table.

All these elements, the artist hopes, come together to create space that mimics the mind in a place of lucid contemplation.

"My ultimate goal as an artist and educator is to create art and environments that generates questioning and discovery, for within this framework of learning and expression, a shift in perception can take place, and a new understanding of life can be revealed," said Parsons.

Parsons has been teaching at Sierra Nevada College for eight years and was named the 2012/2013 Faculty Member of the Year by the SNC student body. He was awarded the Nazir and Mary Ansari 2014/2015 Excellence in Teaching Gold Medal Award. He has also served as sculpture program coordinator at Anderson Ranch Arts Center and has taught at both the University of Dallas and Colorado Mountain College.

Artist and writer Chris Lanier wrote the exhibition essay.

The exhibit will be in the gallery through May 23. The reception and the exhibition are free. The gallery is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

For information, visit CCAI's website at http://www.arts-initiative.org.

Carson City Art Gallery hosting monthlong display by Kortney Beth

Colorful visions of African wildlife, animal motifs, and some skull art, too, are coming to Carson City thanks to Kortney Beth.

Beth, Carson City Art Gallery's next artist of the month, is a Northern Nevadan whose creativity, she said, was developed while growing up in an artistic family.

"Influenced at an early age by the beauty and serene expansive nature of the high desert and Sierras, she is able to see past the barren landscape and find the beauty of a desolate object that nature has passed over transforming it into a piece of beauty," said a press release from the gallery.

Beth's body of work includes paintings and mixed media sculpture, many of which center on wild plant and animal life.

Some of her multimedia projects repurpose old objects to create an entirely new piece of art. One sculpture, titled "The Subject," features a goat skull swathed in electronic parts from a computer monitor and DVD player. The artist said the piece is a statement on "becoming more aware of how much animal testing goes on around the world."

Even with a diverse body of work, Beth's creative process is firmly rooted in her imagination.

"When creating a piece of art, everything around me seems to vanish. I come to an imaginative state of mind to where I am in a dream, a new world that needs to be discovered," Beth said. "When I form many different objects and shapes, my imagination wanders throughout the nonexistent world where there are endless possibilities. I am able to create using any medium or material that is given to me, and I am reminded that anything is possible."

Beth's work will be displayed through February. To meet her, stop by the gallery, 110 S. Curry St., from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, when a reception will offer light refreshments and plenty of art.

For information about the artist, go to http://kortneybethart.com. The gallery is on Facebook, and it also can be reached at 775-313-8628.