Letters to the editor

"I made a straightforward case that myself and fellow board members should do our duty the right way by not taking shortcuts in selecting a new superintendent." "Some other board members tried to obfuscate this basic common sense by kicking up a cloud of dust ..." - Joe Enge in the Nevada Appeal.


Joe's way is not the "Right Way" in this case. Public discussion of an issue by board members and citizens at a televised meeting is more than "Kicking up a cloud of dust." The board voted six to one to negotiate a contract. We have a highly respected trained, experienced and trusted in-house candidate, which the majority of the board members will select, even after a reasonably broad search. We have a school district that is totally focused on the students in the classrooms and also working steadily on trying to meet Nevada and federally mandated test scores, and cannot afford the distraction of a search. We have an open forum at every board meeting where citizens can express their opinions on school matters.


The national trend in superintendent hiring is to hire someone you know, not a stranger you interviewed. Add to this the fact that of the last three superintendents hired one was by search and two were by in-house selection and the two in-house hires worked out well. No shortcuts, just good business practice.


Oh! And please run for school trustee for the kid's sake!


John McKenna


School Trustee District 5




Wilderness designation wouldn't erase jobs


Here we go again ...


In the March 15 Appeal, opponents of wilderness designation pull out the "j-word" bogeyman: jobs, and the loss of them.


I am a 51Ú2-year Lyon County resident who has hiked in the proposed Sisters wilderness area. Phil Tucker is wrong when he maintains, "We're looking at things like job hemorrhage and loss of tax base" if that area is designated wilderness.


When I was living in Nevada County, Calif., there was a 15-year battle to designate 33 miles of the South Yuba River as a wild-and-scenic waterway. Like the western Nevada wilderness fight, scaremongers bleated about job losses.


After the Yuba was protected, the opposite became true. Thousands of Bay area folks began kayaking, mountain-biking, hiking, and swimming in and alongside the river, staying in local hotels and eating in Nevada City's restaurants. Nearby Downieville became a mecca for mountain-biking.


Protecting wilderness gave Nevada County a tourist windfall. Rec jobs were gained, not lost, and I cannot believe that this wouldn't be true here.


As Nevada Wilderness Coalition's Cameron Johnson said in your story, "Camping, picnicking, horseback riding, hunting and fishing are all guaranteed and allowed to continue. Certain routes are left open so motorized access can continue..." If you doubt his words, read the proposal for yourself at www.wildnevada.org/content/view/301/120/.


PATRICIA DEVEREUX


Stagecoach




Government problems the result of poor decisions


Not surprisingly, government officials are now doing what they do best aside from recklessly spending tax money: World-class whining.


Government at all levels is suffering financially from bad decision making by the very politicians who "represent" us. As usual, the answer to any purported revenue shortage is to raise taxes.


Big government is bloated and inefficient. Tax money is wasted and unaccounted for. Our financial gurus spend money foolishly knowing the bankrupt taxpayer is available to rape and plunder again.


One example of big government is its enormous army of employees. Jobs in government have become premium in nature and vigorously sought after. Salaries are huge, benefits royal, and retirement packages princely.


Politicians and labor unions work together tirelessly. Politicians give unions everything they ask for in return for votes and campaign funding. This sordid love affair will plague the taxpayer for decades.


Another serious problem with government is it has been devoid of leadership far too long. It's clear to me, people seek public office only to enrich themselves. Yet, the apparently brainwashed, defeated American people keep re-electing these two-bit hustlers.


The American taxpayer has met the enemy. It's big government. Is it too late for the American people to take back their once-great country?


ROBERT SENNETT


Carson City




Stop trading with OPEC


I like Donald Trump's idea on how to get OPEC and company to lower their prices on crude, which is to convince the free world to deprive those nations of trade until they lower their prices to about $60 a barrel.


Another option for the free world is to levy a tax of $40 on every $100 of product or goods that OPEC and company import from them. And then use the revenue from the tax to fund the retooling of the free world's economies to using hydrogen, solar, natural gas, tidal power and new compressed air technologies in place of fossil fuels. As I see it, what's good for the goose (free world) is good for the gander (OPEC and company). It's time they received a taste of their own medicine. OPEC and company will of course try backdoor trading through other countries so we let them know that if we catch them doing so we will cut them off. In the meantime we tap into reserves and place a flat rate price on it at $60 a barrel. And then use that oil to produce diesel and jet fuel for our trucking and airline industries and for autos and trucks that use diesel. This act will have an impact at lowering the price of food, product and air fares within three to six months of its inception.


If you like Mr. Trump's idea, my option - or both - then please cut this article from your paper, make copies and send them to friends and family and ask them to do the same, and for you and them to also send copies to local papers and local, state and federal representatives. Oh, also add your own two cents if you think your idea could help.


Rumors of this from the right people could start a major stock sell-off in the oil industry and, thereafter, the beginning of a downward spiral of gasoline prices. However, doing nothing will, of course, accomplish nothing.


JAMES PARKER


Carson City




Server proved to be a lifesaver


We recently celebrated our wedding anniversary with our children and grandchildren enjoying a wonderful dinner at B'Sghetti's, a local restaurant. Not only was the food and service exceptional, but we received a special gift from our server Donna. We had a scary moment when our granddaughter began to choke on a piece of ice. We would like to take this opportunity to recognize and express our sincerest gratitude for Donna's quick response, quick action and her ability to deal with the situation. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts for being there for us that evening Donna.


RICK AND SUSAN NICHOLSON


Carson City




A list for Congressman Heller


Recently, a political flier from the Honorable Dean Heller, U.S. House of Representatives, arrived at my home. Attached was a tear-off, self-addressed postcard with a list of national issues to check off the topics important to me. Topics listed included healthcare, immigration, war, etc. However, the issues he listed were not the issues that are most important to me. I affixed my own list of concerns, including the following: Restore my Constitution (renew habeas corpus, stop all rendition, stop all torture, stop surveilling U.S. citizens); impeach President George W. Bush and Vice President Richard Cheney (the most impeachable president and vice president in our history!) for "high crimes and misdemeanors" and for violating their oaths of office; stop the illegal wars based on lies to risk/cost our soldiers' lives for Exxon and Chevron profits; stop ALL no-bid contracts and all war profiteering; ban all corporate donations for all political campaigns for all offices at local, state, and national levels; stop all corporatism of my democracy and, therefore, stop the evolving fascism.


I suggested to Mr. Heller that this would be a pretty good start; these matters would likely keep him busy for the rest of his term. I requested that he ask me again what's important after he's resolved these matters.


I'm sorry I forgot to add our Constitutional requirement to respect all signed treaties as law of the land (including the Geneva Conventions regarding pre-emptive military strikes on sovereign nations being the most grievous war crime), and the Constitutional requirement that the President "...shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed..." - sans signing statements.


Surely there are other voters who have their own lists of what's important to them for Congress' attention. Maybe more of us should be sending our priorities to Mr. Heller rather than waiting for him to presume to know what's important to us.


RICK RIENDEAU


Carson City




Supervisors serving up bitter tea


Alice's Tea Party or Board of Supervisors? One way or the other, we are being served some distressing financial tea. For the first cup, the Board of Supervisors scrupulously has avoided charging builders meaningful impact fees.


For the second cup, the Board of Supervisors is seriously considering raising our real estate taxes to get $8 million to pay for infrastructure improvements.


For the third cup, the Board of Supervisors is seriously considering contributing $10 million to the V&T Railway. In return, V&T would pay Carson City 5 percent of the V&T revenues.


How does each cup go down? Why, for instance, no impact fees? Because, "they would be passed on to the buyers." That is, the buyers would have to pay for the improvements the buyers would require. Gee, that sounds reasonable to me! Why should I pay for you to move here? The "inadequate impact fees" tea is foul.


Are $8 million in improvements needed? Yes, probably. Our city has grown and growth must be paid for. Those who will benefit from them most (developers, builders, new residents) will not have to pay for the improvements, of course; everybody else will. The "improvements" tea is bitter.


The $10 million V&T contribution? Bonds secured with V&T revenues could be sold into the market if this were a reasonable deal. That way Carson City would not have $10 million at risk and the V&T would get the money it needs. Not being able to sell bonds is a superb indicator that the deal doesn't make financial sense. The $10 million for V&T tea is ridiculous.


We have, then, three cups of Alice in Wonderland tea: (1) Don't charge impact fees to pay for improvements; (2) Raise taxes because we don't have $8 million for improvements; and (2) Give away $10 million.


"This is the craziest tea party..."


DAVID CAMPBELL


Carson City




Officers were responsive to citizen's request


I would like to thank the Carson City Sheriff's Department for making my daughter's Sweet 16 party on Saturday evening (March 15) a success.


I asked for them to patrol my house and area to make sure there would be no trouble and they complied tenfold.


I cannot thank you enough for helping our community stay strong and safe for our kids.


Thank you so much!


NANCY SANCHEZ


Carson City




Hospice workers needed


For anyone who has a couple of extra hours a week, Carson City is in great need of hospice volunteers. As someone who has only been doing hospice work for a couple of months, I must say it is the most important and rewarding job I have ever done.


A hospice worker's purpose is to address the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of persons with life-limiting illnesses and to provide support services for their family members. This can be by providing companionship, listening, caregiver respite, errand running or meal preparation.


It does not take a lot - even just one visit a week - to make a difference in a person's life. Sometimes you don't even need to say anything, you just need to be there. For more information on how to become a hospice worker, please go to www.vistacare.com.


STEPHANIE STREENAN


Carson City

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment