City to study speeding solutions

Cathleen Allison/Nevada AppealResidents on Division at Seventh streets have posted a homemade sign to encourage passing motorists to slow down.

Cathleen Allison/Nevada AppealResidents on Division at Seventh streets have posted a homemade sign to encourage passing motorists to slow down.

Carson City will test new ways to slow speeding in neighborhoods in response to complaints from residents tired of drivers breaking the limit " a plan that could include the first speed bump on a city street.

The City Regional Transportation Commission approved $20,000 Wednesday night to study areas including Gregg Street, South Division Street and Northridge Drive where people say drivers cut through to avoid traffic on major streets.

"These guys do not slow down," said Rick Crawford, who lives on Kings Canyon Road. "It amazes me nobody has been killed."

Crawford said he hasn't been able to get the city to put in a speed bump and it won't let him do it himself, adding his design would include barbed wire.

"I can't shoot them," said Crawford, who described himself as a "pretty mellow" person. "That's illegal, too."

But speed bumps aren't the only option the city is considering. Transportation workers also could use dips, signs and displays that both show and record the speeds of drivers.

The city needs to do a study before choosing a policy to see what is both effective and safe, said Patrick Pittenger, city transportation director.

Some things could cause too much noise, for instance, or damage snowplows.

The city also will use the study to find out the best process for people to request the city permanently slow speeders on their streets, Pittenger said.

The transportation commission told the residents who complained about speeders during the meeting that, in the mean time, more police patrols would be requested for problem streets.

Mike Woodman told the commission that he's only seen four drivers get tickets on his street in the 25 years he's lived there.

More police, a speed bump or more signs would help, he said " "just something to break up the traffic there."

Cliff Peterson, who lives on Gregg Street, and others thanked the commission for looking at speeding in their neighborhoods.

Most, like Peterson, have said drivers speed down their street because there are few stops signs. This opens the street to drivers who want to avoid heavy traffic on major streets and are looking for an easy way to cut through.

- Contact reporter Dave Frank at dfrank@nevadaappeal.com or 881-1212.

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