Saylors honored with Red Cross Hero award

Special to the Nevada AppealNevada Appeal publisher Niki Gladys presents Steven Saylor with the Red Cross Real Heroes award for his and wife Johnye's animal rescue work Thursday at Harrah's Reno. The Nevada Appeal was a sponsor of the event that honored Northern Nevadans for acts of heroism large and small.

Special to the Nevada AppealNevada Appeal publisher Niki Gladys presents Steven Saylor with the Red Cross Real Heroes award for his and wife Johnye's animal rescue work Thursday at Harrah's Reno. The Nevada Appeal was a sponsor of the event that honored Northern Nevadans for acts of heroism large and small.

Johnye and Steven Saylor of Dayton were honored Thursday with a Red Cross Real Heroes award for their work with animals in need.

The Saylors run the Judy Project, which provides homes and medical care for abandoned cats on their Dayton ranch.

They were among eight individuals and groups from Carson City, Minden and Lyon County nominated for Red Cross Real Hero awards presented at a ceremony at Harrah's Reno Thursday morning. The Saylors, nominated by first lady Dawn Gibbons, won in the category of Animal Rescue Hero.

According to the nominating letter, the Saylors are housing about 60 cats, and they adopt out 100-200 animals per year to loving homes.

The Saylors work with Petsmart, receiving ripped bags of food, which they donate to food banks, regional shelters and senior programs to help those who are having trouble caring for their own animals. In addition, they provide cats to lonely seniors, along with free food and litter, promising to take the animal back should it outlive its new owner.

Other area nominees were:

- Cathey Keyes

Unsung Hero Award nominee

Nominated by Tina Osborn

Tina Osborn said Keyes helped her find a doctor to operate on a painful mass that most had said was inoperable.

"While Tina was feeling pretty hopeless, Cathey began looking for help. With the help of some friends, she found a surgeon who would take Tina's case and he called her personally to give her the good news," according a news release from the American Red Cross. "Some people, like Cathey, are real heroes to just one person, and make all the difference in the world."

- Lee Radtke

Unsung Hero Award nominee

Nominated by Kris Wells

Lee Radtke's mission to teach the world that second-hand smoke is dangerous starts here at home.

Diagnosed with throat cancer in 2006, Radtke's voice box was removed and he now speaks through a machine. Lee turned this challenge into an opportunity, and contacted the Carson City School District, volunteering to make presentations about the dangers of smoking and second hand smoke at any of the district's schools. Since then, he has presented to more than 3,300 children with the aid of special technology that allows him to speak.

Many of those children tell Lee that they have convinced a parent or sibling to quit smoking after hearing his presentation.

"I thought it was a very nice to be nominated. Mainly I do it for the children, but it's nice to get the recognition and help to get the message out of what I'm trying to accomplish," he said.

- Laura Winking

Animal Rescue Hero nominee

Nominated by Jim Joseph

Laura Winking is the President of Douglas Animal Welfare Group, a volunteer organization that works to ensure adoptable animals at the Douglas County Animal Shelter finds homes. Year-round, DAWG volunteers spend time with the shelter animals providing them with affection and exercise, while also taking photos and learning their traits so they can best advertise the animal.

Winking, as president, acts as a liaison between the shelter and the organization, coordinates volunteers, negotiates spay and neuter programs with veterinarians, secures funding, and will foster animals at home if they are sick, dying or if the shelter is full.

Under her guidance, and the assistance of the volunteers, no adoptable animals from the Douglas shelter have been euthanized since the program began in 2000.

- Ramona McClure

Animal Rescue Hero nominee

Nominated by Ken McClure, Patricia Hamilton, Lynne Arsenault, Jennifer Glancey and Sheari Garris

From her east Carson City home, Ramona McClure rescues abused, neglected or abandoned birds, along with any other animal that's in need of emergency care.

She has adopted out many of the rescued birds to loving homes and uses extensive advertising, word of mouth referrals and contacts with the Nevada Humane Society to find good placements. Recently, she found homes for seven abandoned cockatiels.

- Dagen Kipling

Youth Hero nominee

Nominated by Brenda Kindred-Kipling

For the past two years, Dagen Kipling has decided to give back to the community for Hanukkah rather than receive gifts for eight nights.

"It just feels nicer just to give back than just to receive," the 10-year-old said.

Last Hanukkah he began solicited toiletry items from the community and bought some with his own money. Dagen donated 320 toiletry bags to Nevada Food for Thought, 25 to the Carson Foster Program and two large boxes of miscellaneous items to the Ron Wood Family Resource Center.

- GE Energy

Workplace Safety Award nominee

Nominated by Karen Kerley

This Minden company has integrated workplace safety into their company's culture. Employees are trained in CPR, First Aid and automated external defibrillator use and the building is supplied with readily accessible first aid kits and defibrillators. The company regularly hosts volunteers from the Red Cross to provide information about personal safety and disaster preparedness.

- GE Energy First Responder Team

Workplace Safety Award nominee

Nominated by Scott Sneddon

As part of the Minden company's emphasis on workplace safety, GE Energy trains groups of employees, called First Responder Teams, in first aid, CPR and defibrillator use. It was a normal work day at GE when an employee suffered a heart attack and went into full arrest. Responding to the call for help were Scott Sneddon, Greg Marenco, Candy Koestier, Jack Riley and Belinda Moran. Because of their training, they were able to perform CPR until emergency crews could arrive and take over. The employee recovered and was able to return to work.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment