The saga of the three-legged cat

Bandit is an eight-year-old domestic short hair Tuxedo. He is a special-needs cat. Bandit came to CAPS with a severely broken leg and a tumor. The tumor removal was successful; however, his leg required amputation because of the extensive damage. Now that Bandit is a tripod, he is getting around just fine. He is looking for a soul mate that will love and appreciate his specialness. It could be you. Come and meet him.

Bandit is an eight-year-old domestic short hair Tuxedo. He is a special-needs cat. Bandit came to CAPS with a severely broken leg and a tumor. The tumor removal was successful; however, his leg required amputation because of the extensive damage. Now that Bandit is a tripod, he is getting around just fine. He is looking for a soul mate that will love and appreciate his specialness. It could be you. Come and meet him.

I have mentioned before that CAPS wears many caps and several of them are not in the description of an animal shelter’s duties. Recently an emergency that seemed daunting arrived at our door. Bandit, a beautiful black and white cat, with a severely broken leg and a tumor needed help.
The veterinarian examined him and recommended surgery for the tumor and amputation for his leg. The cost of these procedures was an issue especially during this time, because we have had no fundraising activities. Thankfully, Diane Peters generously offered to pay for the surgery. Bandit is now the amazing, tumor free, three-legged cat.
I wondered what the long-term prognosis for cat amputees was, so I decided to find out. According to Dr. Pavia, who specializes in amputations, life improves after amputation, because the source of pain is gone. The pet is already used to shifting his weight to three limbs to avoid pain so adjusting to loss is easier.
Compared to human limb amputations pets recover much quicker. After amputation, pets still have three legs and they can quickly adjust to redistributing their weight to three legs. Pets also do not suffer from the psychological trauma of limb loss, because many are unaware that they are any different.
Most cats and dogs adapt well to living with three legs, and the agile nature of cats allows them to accept the change gracefully. It is slightly easier for cats to recover from hind limb amputation, because they carry 60 percent of their body weight on the front legs. However, most cats with front limb amputations also do well.
Tripods, the name for three-legged cats, are unique and offer owners the chance to see adaptation in action. Bandit is our wonder cat and the bandit of our hearts.
 
IN NEED OF
Folks to help “Pup Grade” our kennels: see the details below.
Puppy milk, puppy pads, and Taste of the Wild Puppy food. We have puppies that need lots of care and supplies.
Dry cat food and Friskies wet. Dry dog food and Pedigree wet food. Our current supplier of donated food is no longer distributing food to shelters. We need help to maintain our guests.
Aluminum cans. If you have, cans to pick up, give us a call (775-423-7500) and we will come get them. You can also drop them off at CAPS.
 
SHOUT OUT TO

Janis Woods for the donation of puppy pads, food, and treats. A Four-Paw salute to you!

Our anonymous generous benefactor for your donation. Kindness never fails!

Diane Peters for donating the money for emergency surgery on Bandit. You are just purrfect!

Mike for another big bag of cans. Pooch smooches to you!


COME SEE US

CAPS is now open, by appointment only, for adoptions, SNAPS, and food pantry. We cannot accept volunteers until further notice. Call 775-423-7500.
 
DON’T FORGET
February Pet Holiday: National Cat Health Month
You can help “Pup Grade” our kennels. We rely on fundraisers, donations, and volunteers but the pandemic has crippled our sources of revenue. At this time, our kennels are in need of serious service.
We need permanent roofs over the outdoor kennels and new flooring in the indoor kennels. If you are able to contribute expertise, supplies, or monetary assistance please call at 775-423-7500.

CONTACT CAPS 
CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are likeable.
CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me at jkwmil@outlook.com.

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