The mystery of feline stomatitis

Buttercup is a striking seven-year-old domestic, shorthair Calico. She came to CAPS after her caregiver passed away. Framed with perfect eyeline, her beautiful eyes can gaze into your soul. Buttercup loves everyone and makes friends easily. She is looking for a forever home. Come out and meet her and you will be happy you did.

Buttercup is a striking seven-year-old domestic, shorthair Calico. She came to CAPS after her caregiver passed away. Framed with perfect eyeline, her beautiful eyes can gaze into your soul. Buttercup loves everyone and makes friends easily. She is looking for a forever home. Come out and meet her and you will be happy you did.

Watson here, and during my recent spa visit at the veterinarian’s, I ran into Diane Peters, the cat lady of CAPS. Her poor little kitty was suffering from stomatitis. I had never heard of stomatitis, and I promised Diane that I would research and write about this chronic condition.

Stomatitis is a term for extensive, chronic, and painful inflammation in the mouth. According to the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the disease affects approximately 4 percent of cats. Known as feline chronic gingivostonatitis, stomatitis is common, painful and can affect cats of all breeds and ages.

There are two main types of stomatitis. One form involves inflammation of the gums surrounding teeth; the second form, called caudal stomatitis of facucitis, affects the back of the mouth where the jaws meet.
Scientists do not know the cause of stomatitis, but they are aware that affected cats have altered immune function. Viruses, bacteria, and periodontal disease contribute to the disease, but they do not know the reason that the immune systems go crazy.

There may be a link between stomatitis and calicivirus, which is an upper respiratory disease in cats. Viruses can affect the immune system, too. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency are common maladies. The reaction to the disease is excessive inflammation in the mouth.

Inflammation of the gums is a sign of stomatitis. It also causes bad breath, drooling, and excessive swallowing. Because it is so painful, your cat may refuse to eat and groom itself. Unfortunately, there is no specific test for this condition. The cat’s health history and a physical exam can diagnose stomatitis.
Treatment depends on different factors, including how the cat responds to therapy and the severity of the disease. There is no specific treatment, but there are ways to manage the disease.

When properly managed, your cat may require long-term, anti-inflammatory medicine and antibiotic therapy to control inflammation.

Nutrition is important so switching to wet cat food or pureed food will help maintain your cat’s diet and will cause less stress while eating. Although this is a painful condition, many cats do well with therapy and lead quality lives. I hope Diane’s cat is doing well.
XOXO Watson
 
LOOKING FOR A HOME
We have two four-month-old Tuxedo kittens that need fosters. Call 775-423-7500 for details.
Policy, however, prohibits adopting out puppies or kittens under the age of six months to a home with children under 5 years of age. This is to protect both the children and the animal.

IN NEED OF
Recipes! Please send your favorite recipes to, crazydogmom1810@gmail.com.We are compiling a CAPS favorite’s cookbook.
Garage sale items. We need gently used appliances, furniture, treadmills, and miscellaneous items. We do not need clothing. Call 775-423-7500 for pick up.
Dry cat food and Friskies wet. Dry dog food and Pedigree wet food.
Aluminum cans. If you have, cans to pick up, give us a call (775-423-7500) and we will come get them. You can also drop them off at CAPS.
 
SHOUT OUT TO 
All of the wonderful CAPS volunteers and CAPS staff who have been braving the heat and smoke to care for our guests. A Four-Paw-Salute to you!


COME SEE US
CAPS is now open, we suggest appointments for adoptions, SNAPS, and food pantry. We cannot accept volunteers until further notice. Call 775-423-7500.

 
DON’T FORGET
July Pet Holiday: National Pet Parents Month
You can open an account with Chewy and reference; CAPS in the order. CAPS will receive $20 directly into the operating account with your first $50 order. Chewy offers quality food and free two-day delivery on orders over $50. Check our Facebook page, Churchill Animal Protection Society, for more details.
 
CONTACT CAPS 
CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada)
Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me at jkwmil@outlook.com.

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