Elks conducts annual Flag Day ceremony

Leo Arcoraci posts a flag with 20 stars that was approved by Congress in 1818. The number of stripes remained at 13 and the stars represented each of the 20 states. A star was added for each new state.

Leo Arcoraci posts a flag with 20 stars that was approved by Congress in 1818. The number of stripes remained at 13 and the stars represented each of the 20 states. A star was added for each new state.

Fallon Elks Lodge 2239 conducted its annual Flag Day ceremony June 14. This year, the Elks and by Boy Scouts Troop 1776 assembled at the Lions softball complex.
The ceremony honors the anniversary of the nation’s flag and to booster the spirit of American patriotism.


Steve Ranson/LVN
Readers from Fallon Elks Lodge 2239 included, from left, Sarena Whisenhunt, lecturing knight; Nancy Balash, loyal knight; Roy Gramlich, exalted ruler; Gary Butori, leading knight; and Jim Alexander, squire.

 
According to the Elks Club, the American flag marks the progression of the U.S. government. A presentation on the flag’s evolution began with the Pine Tree flag, which was carried by the Continental forces in the Battle of Bunker Hill.
That flag was followed by the Snake flag, which was flown by the southern colonies in 1776 and 1777. A single flag, though, represented the 13 colonies, and over the years, stars were added to signify the new states admitted.
Scouts posted the final two flags: The U.S. flag with its 50 stars and the POW/MIA flag.
Scouts posting the flags were Zander Sheldon-Clark, Austin Thibodaux, Matthew Melancon, Dylan Clark, John Schoenmeier, Leo Arcoraci, Benjamin Tallquist, Jace Slentz and Justin Stralo.


Steve Ranson/LVN
Flags flap in the wind after the Elks ceremony.

 
At the end of the ceremony, the Elks encourage people to honor and respect the flag. The flag is formally honored by the Pledge of Allegiance, which was written in 1892 by Francis Bellamy and published in “The Youth’s Companion” as part of a patriotic campaign of that magazine.
The Pledge of Allegiance did not become part of the Flag Code until 1942, and in 1954, the phrase “Under God” was added.
Flag Day concluded with participants and guests singing God Bless America.

Steve Ranson/LVN
Gary Butori, left, the leading knight for Elks Lodge 2239, talks to Boy Scouts from Troop 176 before last week’s Flag Day ceremony.

 

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