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Are you getting flaky? Find out why

By Kathleen Williams-Miller
Fluffy is a striking 13-year-old gray/white domestic short hair. She has divine green eyes that sparkle. Her favorite things are being petted, having treats, and being with people. Fluffy is looking for a home where she will be loved and cared for. Come out and meet this adorable girl.
CAPS

Watson here and since we have been staying home, I’ve been getting extra attention. Yes, everyday mom or dad brushes me, cleans my teeth, and makes sure I’m comfy. Actually, I’m spoiled rotten. Recently, during one of my brushing sessions, mom uncovered flakes.

Could this be dandruff? With a little sleuthing, mom found information on skin conditions common in dogs. There are several types of skin maladies affecting dogs.

Dandruff is the presence of dead skin cells. However, simple things such as daily brushing, a balanced diet, and dietary supplements can go a long way to remedy this problem. Some of the other skin problems require more intervention.

Walking dandruff is a parasitic infection call Cheyletiellosis that is caused by mites. If your pup is scratching, licking, or biting his skin, check the area for hair loss, redness, and scaly patches. This type of dandruff is extremely contagious because the mites can spread to other pets and humans. When you notice redness and scaly patches, get to the vet, pronto!

Seborrhea, a condition sort of like acne in humans, causes greasy skin because of overactive oil glands. There isn’t a definite explanation why this happens, but genetics is suspected.

Bacterial and fungal skin infections are serious, because they cause hot spots or greasy patches. These infections can set up a vicious cycle that totally depletes the skin’s ability to protect itself. If your BFF has hot spots or greasy patches, check with your vet for treatment.

One of the most common reasons for flaky skin is dry climate. Living in the desert can be challenging for dogs skin so the best ways to combat flakes are:

1. Brush your dog once a day.

2. Add omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid to your pup’s food and give him plenty of water.

3. Use a soap-free, natural shampoo made in the USA.

Well, after a brushing and a bath, I’m glowing. No more flakes for this boy!

XOXO Watson

IN NEED OF

We need someone with a big truck (that can be loaded from a dock) who is willing to pick up food from Chewy’s. If you are that person, give us a call at 775-423-7500.

Items for the CAPS annual garage sale. Call 775-423-7500 to have us pick up items.

Aluminum cans. If you have cans to pick up, give us a call (775-423-7500), and we will come get them. You can also drop them off at CAPS.

Folks who need help affording spaying/neutering for dogs or cats. SNAPS program details are below.

SHOUT OUT TO

Pauline, John, Ken, Diane, Mavis, Janise, Kimmy and Kim for your help. A big pooch smooch to you!

The Churchill County Parks and Recreation Department for beautifying the dog park. A loud bark to you!

COME SEE US

CAPS is open, by appointment only, for adoptions, SNAPS, and food pantry. We cannot accept volunteers until further notice. Call 775-423-7500.

DON’T FORGET

July Pet Holiday: National Lost Pet Prevention Month. Make sure your pet is chipped.

SNAPS is a program offered to Churchill County residents through CAPS that provides low-cost spay/neutering for cats and dogs. To qualify for SNAPS, you need to have one of the following: Medicaid, a child enrolled in NV Check Up Program, food stamps, 2019 tax return stating income is less than $30,000 or Veterans disability card including a photo ID. Also required are a Churchill County ID and a co-pay. For information, call CAPS at 423-7500.

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likeable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me at jkwmil@outlook.com.