Arizona man sentenced for illegally making ammunition related to Las Vegas massacre | NevadaAppeal.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Arizona man sentenced for illegally making ammunition related to Las Vegas massacre

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2019, file photo, Douglas Haig, left, and his attorney, Marc Victor leave the Lloyd George Federal Courthouse in Las Vegas, after pleading guilty to illegally manufacturing tracer and armor-piercing bullets found in a high-rise hotel suite where a gunman took aim before the Las Vegas Strip massacre two years ago. Haig is a 57-year-old aerospace engineer who used to reload bullets at home in Mesa, Airz., and sell them at gun shows. Douglas Haig has been sentenced to 13 months in federal prison after selling home-loaded bullets to the gunman who killed 58 people in the Las Vegas Strip shooting in Oct. 2017. Haig, 57, also was sentenced Tuesday, June 30, 2020, in Las Vegas to three years of supervised release after pleading guilty last November to illegally manufacturing ammunition.
Elizabeth Page Brumley/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP

A Mesa, Arizona man has been sentenced to 13 months in federal prison for manufacturing ammunition without a federal license.

Nevada U.S. Attorney Nick Trutanich and FBI agent Aaron Rouse said the investigation of Douglas Haig, 57, started from the investigation of the October 1 Harvest Festival shootings  after agents found a box of ammo in the room where the shooter staged his attack bearing Haig’s name and address on the shipping label.

Haig operated “Specialized Military Ammunition,” an internet business that made and sold ammunition, including armor piercing and high explosive ammunition, throughout the U.S.

They said Haig did not possess a federal firearms license and was not authorized to manufacture ammunition.

That federal license is not required of individuals who load and reload ammunition for their own use such as target shooting and hunting.

Agents seized hundreds of pounds of ammunition and components during the investigation. They also found Haig’s fingerprints on two rounds of armor piercing ammunition found in the October 1 shooter’s hotel room.