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Being in the chips really counts

By Kathleen Williams-Miller
Bombon is a handsome three-year-old border collie mix. He adores being around people and is eager to please. He gets along with everyone and loves to walk on a leash. He’s looking for a home where he can run, play ball, and cuddle. Come out and meet this adorable guy; he’s waiting to take you for a walk.
Courtesy

Watson here and I have great news. The dog park is open again. It’s been over two months, and I was so happy to run around in the old stomping grounds. In fact, the last time I was in the dog park before it closed, we found a lost dog. He was a big yellow Lab who didn’t have a collar or any identification.

We took him to CAPS to call the pound and see if anyone had inquired about a missing dog. Luckily, he had been microchipped and with the help of a chip reader we found his owner. In no time at all his dad came to pick up the lost boy dog. A happy ending for both of them!

Microchips are tiny electronic devices that are injected under the skin between the shoulder blades. To do this, veterinarians use a hypodermic needle. When a scanner is passed over your pet’s skin, the chip is activated and a unique identification number is sent back to the scanner. After you get the chip’s number, and the company that made it you can contact the company and find the owner.

It’s essential to check your registration to make sure the information is correct. If the information isn’t up to date, your BFF can be stranded. A lot of folks think chips are like a tracker or a GPS device, but a microchip only works if someone scans it. Microchips are only effective if someone takes a lost pet to a shelter or veterinarian’s office to be scanned for a chip.

This story has a happy ending but not all stories do because up to 8 million animals end up in shelters every year. Sadly, only 15-20 percent of dogs and less than 2 percent of cats are ever found by their owners. One of the best ways to increase chances of finding your lost BFF is having him micro chipped because they are a life line.

May is National Chip Your Pet Month, and I guess you could say I’m quite chipper.

XOXO Watson

IN NEED OF

Bleach, hand sanitizer, Clorox wipes, and disinfectant.

Items for the CAPS annual garage sale. Call 775-423-7500 for details.

Aluminum cans. If you have cans to pick up, give us a call (775-423-7500), and we will come get them. You can also drop them off at CAPS.

Everyone to register in the AmazonSmile program. The details are below.

SHOUT OUT TO

Maddie’s Fund for providing the money for free spay/neuter. A pooch smooch to you!

The new “pet parents” of Rosy and Braco. Thank you for opening your homes and hearts to them. A Pawsitive smile to you!

COME SEE US

CAPS is open, by appointment only, for adoptions, SNAPS, and food pantry. We cannot accept volunteers until further notice. Call 775-423-7500.

DON’T FORGET

May Pet Holiday: National Chip Your Pet Month

To register in the AmazonSmile program, a website operated by Amazon. Customers enjoy the same selection of products, low prices and shopping features as on Amazon.com. The only difference is that, when you shop on AmazonSmile (smile.amazon.com), the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the price of eligible purchases to the charitable organization selected by you.

You can donate directly to CAPS on Facebook by just hitting the donate button. We are in dire straits at this time and anything helps! We thank you for your support!

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likeable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me, jkwmil@outlook.com.