Capital Gains Tax reform 2.0? | NevadaAppeal.com

Capital Gains Tax reform 2.0?

Courtesy Peterson Wealth Management

Capital gains tax reform comes with a big price tag: $100 billion over 10 years.

A capital gain is any increase in the value of an asset, such as an investment, a home, land, etc., between its purchase and its sale. The amount of a gain is determined by subtracting the purchase price from the sale price.

Last week, the White House proposed capital gains be adjusted or 'indexed' for inflation before they're taxed. Princeton Professor Alan Blinder explained the idea in The Wall Street Journal:

"Why index gains? Suppose you own a stock for many years, during which time overall prices have doubled because of inflation. Over the holding period, the value of your stock also has doubled. When you sell, the proceeds have precisely the same purchasing power as the original purchase. There's no gain, no loss. But under current tax law, you owe taxes on the phantom 'gain.' Worse, if your stock went up by less than the cumulative inflation, you'll still get taxed despite your loss. This is unfair and dysfunctional."

While the suggestion is appealing to many investors, it's not without controversy. For example, the White House suggested the Treasury Department change the tax code without congressional approval by modifying enforcement regulations. However, the legislative branch — Congress — is constitutionally responsible for tax law.

In addition, adjusting capital gains for inflation without doing the same for interest expense and depreciation may allow some taxpayers to be able to generate significant losses on paper. Current tax law includes provisions that limit this kind of tax strategy, but indexing capital gains would reopen the door, reported the Tax Policy Center.

Recommended Stories For You

Another consideration is the impact of the change on the deficit and the national debt. The Congressional Budget Office estimates suggest 2017 tax reform will increase "…the total projected deficit over the 2018-2028 period by about $1.9 trillion." Adjusting capital gains for inflation could increase the shortfall by about $100 billion over a decade, reported Naomi Jagoda for The Hill.

THE MILLENNIAL WAY

From social media to housing options to banking, every generation has had its own preferences. Today, millennials (individuals between the ages of 18 and 34) are having a profound influence on lifestyle and culture. Here are trends to watch:

1. Millennials are moving to smaller cities. "Mid- or second-tier cities, loosely defined as those under a million people, are increasingly seen as not just places to find a lower cost of living, easier commute, and closer connections with family, but also a more approachable, neighborhood-oriented version of the urban lifestyle that sent many to the larger cities in the first place," reported Patrick Sisson for Curbed.com.

2. Millennials like point-of-sale loans. Point-of-sale loans are catching on. The Economist reported, "Consumers who might previously have financed big-ticket purchases such as furniture, electronics, or home-improvement projects with a credit card are now opting to borrow at the checkout, often with an initial 0 percent interest rate. These short-term credit products were once the domain of big banks…(and) store-branded credit cards. Now tech startups are entering the market with innovative techniques for underwriting."

This article was provided by Peterson Wealth Management. For more information, please call 775-423-8007 or visit PetersonWM.com.