Concrete’s role in construction helps cement region’s rebound | NevadaAppeal.com

Concrete’s role in construction helps cement region’s rebound

Steve Sinovic
info@nnbw.biz

The construction industry in northern Nevada continues to thrive in a rebounding economy compared to the years past when many contractors were pounding the pavement for work.

With Tesla, Switch, Apple and myriad other companies planting new roots in northern Nevada, all have a similar need: building with concrete — from tilt-ups to residential flat work, parking lots to truck ramps, concrete is laying down the path to economic revitalization.

That’s according to Dan Gotta, one of the organizers and session moderators behind the 13th annual Nevada Infrastructure Concrete Conference Oct. 27 at the Atlantis.

“Concrete is a main enabler of modern construction,” helping drive economic growth, innovation and jobs, said Gotta, a project manager at Wood Rogers Inc., a civil engineering firm. He’s currently the independent auditor on the Virginia Street Bridge project.

Gotta, who has worked in the industry for 25 years, said product innovations offer builders more flexibility than ever before, particularly when a project has highly complex systems.

Manufacturers have developed specialty admixtures related to “durability, finishability and strength,” said Gotta. From a sustainability standpoint, new formulas are also reducing the industry’s carbon footprint.

“It’s more than just a bag of concrete,” said Gotta, referring to a product that consists of cement, rocks, sand, water and chemical admixtures. Concrete still is one of the most used man-made materials in the world. And, there is no substitute in development that might take its place as the elemental building block, Gotta said.

This year’s conference features keynote speakers Brian Bonnefant, project manager for the Center for Regional Studies, a self-supporting, economic and demographic research collaborative between University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Business and the Nevada Small Business Development Center; and Eugenia Larmore, president of Ekay Economic Consultants.

They will share their analysis of what job growth in northern Nevada from the recent addition of major technology and manufacturing corporations will have on private construction projects and public works that have a concrete focus.

Several hundred people are expected to attend, mostly general contractors, engineers and public works professionals.

The registration fee is $120 and continuing education credits are avialable. Sponsors will host a full breakfast, lunch and snacks. The conference runs from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Log on to http://www.sierranevadaconcrete.org to find out more and register for the event.