Carson City Board of Supervisors place restrictions on proposed RV park’s guest policy | NevadaAppeal.com

Carson City Board of Supervisors place restrictions on proposed RV park’s guest policy

The Board of Supervisors denied the appeal of a special use permit for an RV park, but placed new restrictions on the park’s guest policy.
Board of Supevisors

The Board of Supervisors denied the appeal of a special use permit for an RV park, but placed new restrictions on the park’s guest policy. In January, the Planning Commission approved an SUP to allow up to 180-day stays at Sierra Skies RV Resort, a park planned on 38 acres on Old Hot Springs Road. The vote was 4-2, with commission members Charles Borders and Hope Tingle voting no and one seat on the seven-member commission vacant.

Neighbors to the property spoke in opposition to it at the meeting, citing several reasons but especially the long-term stay, and one nearby homeowner, Tammy Lubich, appealed the decision to the Board of Supervisors.

At Thursday’s board meeting, Rachel Kryder, project engineer, Resource Concepts Inc., representing the park property owner, said the park needs to offer the option of longer than 30-day stays in order to make it as a business. The appellant said the neighbors’ concerns are the park will become a residence for its tenants rather than a vacation spot.

“When you have three-plus months you start to get decks, barbecues, things become permanent,” said Heather Wiese, representing her mother, the appellant, because Lubich couldn’t attend the meeting.

Kryder said that was not the owner’s intent, and the cost of staying there would likely deter anyone from using it as a permanent residence.

But Supervisor Brad Bonkowski said RVs have become a living alternative in a tight housing market.

“The comments I’m hearing is RV parks are the new workforce housing,” said Bonkowski. “The vacancy rate in Carson City is less than 1 percent. People working here can’t find a place to live. How do we put conditions on this that are appropriate so this situation doesn’t get out of hand?”

Supervisor Lori Bagwell proposed a condition requiring guests staying 180 days to vacate the park for at least 30 days to prevent people from skirting the limit by changing spaces or leaving for a day and returning. Lee Plemel, director, Community Development, suggested additional language to guarantee guests couldn’t leave sooner than the 180-day deadline and return quickly, and the board voted to deny the appeal and uphold the commission’s decision with the added condition.

The supervisors also approved a proposed policy for small cell equipment installation on poles and street lights located in the city rights of way. The policies lay out aesthetics, such as camouflaging the equipment, for the upcoming influx of 4G, or fourth generation, cellular service equipment. The city is anticipating 25 to 30 applications a year to install equipment on city streetlights and poles. At a later date, the board will approve the application fee, which staff is estimating at $1,400 to cover staff time and other costs.

The board also revoked a 47-year-old resolution outlining a maintenance agreement with Douglas County for Carson City to maintain Center Drive in Douglas County.

The street is at the southern edge of Carson City where the county line between Carson City and Douglas County weaves back and forth. At the time, the area wasn’t developed, and it was easier for Carson City to maintain, but now there are homes there in Douglas County.

The supervisors approved contracts for two major trails projects: a $404,900 contract with Lumos & Associates, Inc., for design, engineering and construction of Carson River Trail System Phase II, and a $205,701 contract with MNW Construction, LLC for Long Ranch Park ramp and path improvements.