Flooding possible in western Nevada due to rapid snowpack melt | NevadaAppeal.com

Flooding possible in western Nevada due to rapid snowpack melt

Nevada Appeal staff report
The National Weather Service says minor flooding caused by strong runoff due to “rapid melting of the high elevation snowpack" is possible this week.
Nevada Appeal file photo

The National Weather Service has issued a Hazardous Weather Conditions alert for western Nevada due to expected strong runoff caused by “rapid melting of the high elevation snowpack.”

The alert states, “minor flooding is possible later this week on the West Walker River above Topaz Lake” and includes a warning the flows in regional rivers and streams will be swift and cold by the middle of the week.

“To the north, there does not appear to be enough snowpack left to produce flooding along the unregulated portions of the Carson River system, or in the Truckee River system, but high flows are still likely for smaller streams in the Lake Tahoe Basin,” the alert said.

“Due to the considerable snowpack remaining in the Walker River basin, minor flooding is possible later this week on the West Walker River above Topaz Lake. Below Topaz Lake and Bridgeport Reservoir, high flows are expected as well. Reservoir operations will have an influence on the flows through the Mason Valley, but current projections indicate the possibility of minor flooding near the Walker River by late in the week. Peak flows on the West Walker River are expected from late Tuesday night through early Thursday morning while peak flows farther downstream are likely to be from mid-week into next weekend.”

Lyon County and Walker River Irrigation District officials are monitoring the Walker River, according to a statement. Low-lying areas in Mason Valley along the river are experiencing minor flooding but no homes are threatened as of Monday morning. The county has ordered sand and may deploy self sandbag locations as the situation changes.

“The elevated, swift, cold flows may affect hikers and campers in and near the Sierra. Peak flows overnight may catch those camping close to creeks and streams off guard, so campers are advised to avoid setting up camp too close to creeks and streams,” the NWS alert said. “Hikers should be alert for snow bridges over creeks in higher elevations.”

Yard Watering

Even with the potential for flooding, home watering restrictions remain in effect.

Odd-numbered addresses are allowed to water on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Even-numbered addresses can water on Sundays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

Watering must be done before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m., and there’s no watering on Monday.

According to the city web site, hand watering is allowed when flowers, shrubs, and vegetables need it and don’t water when temperatures are too high or conditions too windy.

The restrictions are in effect through Sept. 30.

The NWS Forecast

Monday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 50. North wind around 5 mph becoming west after midnight.

Tuesday: Sunny, with a high near 92. Calm wind becoming east around 5 mph in the afternoon.

Tuesday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 53. West wind around 5 mph.

Wednesday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 1 p.m. Mostly sunny, with a high near 90. Southwest wind 5 to 10 mph.

Wednesday night: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 11 p.m. Partly cloudy, with a low around 51.

Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 86.

Thursday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 52.

Friday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 86.

Friday night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 51.

Saturday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 85.

Saturday night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 50.

Sunday: Sunny, with a high near 83.