Past Pages for July 20 to July 24, 2019 | NevadaAppeal.com

Past Pages for July 20 to July 24, 2019

Sue Ballew
Carson City looking north from the top of the Capitol building in 1871.
Courtesy Nevada State Museum

Saturday

150 Years Ago

Hot: The amount of calorie in the atmosphere raised old mercury as noticed at Dr. Munckton’s store. It had crawled up to 89 degrees Fahrenheit—a pretty good heat for Sageland.

140 Years Ago

Presbyterian picnic: The picnic of the Presbyterian Sunday Schools at Treadway’ park was passed pleasantly with dancing, romping and having a general good time.

130 Years Ago

All sorts: For the past few days forty ministers have been in Carson. Yesterday Lilly Clay’s forty beauties blew into town. Yellow-legged chickens are worth one dollar each, and Carson is still as happy as though it had not lost any fun.

110 Years Ago

Ice that lasts: If you want ice that is as hard as cut glass and taken from the highest point in the Sierras and ice that stays with you all day and part of the next in the hottest weather get it from Doc Benton.

100 Years Ago

Government to sell houses: More than 6,000 houses erected in various communities for occupancy by war workers are to be offered for sale to individuals at fair prices and on time payment. A bill to authorize this arrangement has been passed by Congress.

50 Years Ago

Advertisement: “Grey Reid’s—We Give S & H Green Stamps. Nevada’s Fine Department Store; Fashions, Family Needs, Auto Center, Sporting Goods, Giftwares and Books. Purchases shipped anywhere. Carson City Mall, Carson.”

Sunday

150 Years Ago

Catholic Service: There will be no mass in the Catholic Church at 11 a.m. After Father Mevil’s sermon in English, he will preach to the French speaking congregation.

140 Years Ago

Relics of a lost tribe: Some curiously shaped mounds near Pancake, Nevada were explored by Mr. Leslie in company with Mr. Semple and J. C. Garret. They had difficulty getting into the mound, but once through were rewarded by the discovery of various interesting relics. The mound was an ancient burial place. Some bones crumbled and fell to pieces as soon as exposed to the air, but others were preserved. Besides the human bones, there were other items scattered throughout the mound–pieces of pottery, flint, arrowheads and stone implements.

130 Years Ago

Silver Mountain City: Work will be resumed on the mines of Alpine County. Lewis Chalmers is being backed by English capital for another try in that mountainous region.

110 Years Ago

The Fountain from Maine: The City Marshall is getting tools ready to pump out, dry out, dig out and clean out the cistern at King and Carson streets where the city fountain is to be placed. The huge stone fountain has arrived from Rockland, Maine and will require a stone or cement foundation at least eight feet deep and five feet square. The water company proposed to furnish water for the fountain for five years. It is a gift from the National Human Alliance from a fund provided by the late Harmon Lee Ensign and will be unveiled on Labor Day.

50 Years Ago

Photo caption: Signs of the times—With the merger of Ormsby into Carson City, the city’s 141 square miles make the largest political entity of its type anywhere around which includes some six square miles of Lake Tahoe. The Nevada Highway Department is faced with the dilemma of where and how to post its road signs to reflect the new order of things. Alona Donshoe of Reno who is a lifeguard at Burnt Cedar Beach volunteered to assist.

20 Years Ago

Photo caption: Gene Brewer of Virginia City Shootin’ Starz looks out from the second story stage to the seating section in Virginia City before the opening night of ‘Tell it to Finney.’ The custom stage was a two-story house that opens up to reveal the characters on different floors.

Tuesday

150 Years Ago

General Tom Thumb and wife: Also known as Commodore Nutt and Winnie Warren will be here in August. The characters that will be those of “A Stump Orator,” “An Old Maid” by Mrs. Thumb, and “One of the Old Folks” by Minnie Warren.

140 Years Ago

Mysterious death: Mrs. George Steinmitz and her oldest daughter were found drowned in a water trough at the ranch. The water was eighteen inches deep. The feet of the dead were up and out of the water. Mr. Steinmitz, the husband and father, is in the mountains with his sheep. Death was caused either by murder or suicide.

130 Years Ago

Handsomest girls: One by one the handsomest girls in Ormsby county are being snapped up by San Franciscans. This shows a lamentable lack of enterprise on the part of our local bachelors.

110 Years Ago

Aero plane: Orville Wright took his aero plane up 280 feet and sailed and soared around for over an hour and twenty minutes.

First Man to fly across: Louis Bieriot, French aviator, flew across the English Channel from Calais to Dover at 60 miles an hour–and he won $5000.

50 Years Ago

Nerve gas testing sites: Washington—Congressmen are concerned about chemical and biological warfare and have expressed more alarm when being told the Army has an open-air, nerve gas testing program over three locations: Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, Edgewood Arsenal in Maryland and Fort McClellan, Alabama. Testing at the Dugway installation received nationwide attention when 6,000 sheep were killed in the area.

20 Years Ago

Save and preserve Lake Tahoe: Governor Gray Davis of California took a short tour of the lake on the University of California-Davis research vessel. “I’m here because I care about Lake Tahoe. Government needs to (help preserve) the gifts we’ve been given. We’ve been given no greater gift than Lake Tahoe.”

Sue Ballew is the daughter of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.