Dennis Cassinelli: Mark Twain, timber baron, Part 2: The inferno | NevadaAppeal.com

Dennis Cassinelli: Mark Twain, timber baron, Part 2: The inferno

Dennis Cassinelli

The timber camp of Sam Clemens and John Kinney has been traced to the east shore of Lake Tahoe, about a mile south of Sand Harbor State Park.

Having worked for more than eight years at Glenbrook and navigated my own boat along the east and north shores of Lake Tahoe, I feel I can easily trace the route taken and where the timber camp of Sam Clemens and John Kinney was located by the descriptions given in the "Roughing It" account. My interpretation places the camp on the east shore of the lake.

In Twain's own words, he describes how he avoided any strenuous activity, delegating the rowing of the skiff and anything requiring any effort to Kinney. The remainder of their stay at the camp was spent loafing, playing cards, fishing and enjoying the serene beauty of Lake Tahoe. They floated in the skiff and admired the fish and underwater features through the pristine crystal clear waters that made them feel as if they were floating in a balloon. Their most strenuous activities involved smoking their pipes, reading dog-eared novels and occasionally rowing over to the camp of the Irish Brigade to raid their cache of supplies.

Upon return from one of their "shopping" trips, Mark Twain built a fire for their evening meal while John carried the provisions to the lean-to house. Mark went back to the skiff to fetch the frying pan when John shouted the fire had escaped the fire pit into the dry pine needles and brush. Within a few minutes the escaping camp fire consumed the lean-to house, the provisions and all the furnishings of their beautiful lakeside home. It raged through the brush, slash and pine needles and began consuming some of the huge old dead standing trees.

The pair watched helplessly as the fire raged on over the mountains and from one ridge to another in crimson spirals as far as the eye could see. They were spellbound by the spectacle and the roaring, crackling inferno they were witnessing. From a position alongside the skiff, they marveled at the beauty of the flames and the "bewildering richness about it that enchanted the eye and held it with stronger fascination."

And so, after just two or three weeks of "working their claim" on the shores of Lake Tahoe, the timber baron phase of Twain's experience in Nevada Territory came to a flaming end. The pair never sold a single log and they never even filed the timber claim at the recorder's office. Twain and Kinney returned to Carson City the next day after eating up the rest of the provisions from the stash of the Irish Brigade. Upon their return, Twain told the Brigade about raiding their supplies and asked forgiveness. It was granted, only upon payment of damages.

Since operating a logging and timber operation didn't seem to be a vocation suited to Twain's aptitude, he contemplated something more appropriate, such as prospecting, for example. Sooner or later, he would find his niche in the history of the Comstock and America.

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After years of controversy over the location of Sam Clemens cove where the timber claim was located, it has been determined by several historians examining considerable evidence the claim had been located on the east shore of the lake as I had always believed, about a mile north of Thunderbird Lodge and a little over a mile south of Sand Point at Sand Harbor State Park.

This article is by Dayton author and historian Dennis Cassinelli, who can be contacted on his blog at denniscassinelli.com. All Dennis' books sold through this publication will be at a 50 percent discount plus $3 for each shipment for postage and packaging.