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Fallon soldier holds key position during Combined Resolve XIV

By Staff Sgt. Ryan Getsie Joint Multinational Readiness Center
Staff Sgt. Alex Houston stands in front of a motor pool staging area.
PC. Albert Valladares

Churchill County grad provides support for the Joint Multinational Readiness Center training in Germany

HOHENFELS, Germany – Staff Sgt. Alex Houston hails from Fallon, a small town boasting a population of 8,000. Today, Houston’s work with the U.S. Army has taken him all over the globe, including his most recent position at Hohenfels with the 3rd Infantry Division, 2nd Brigade, where he has been stationed for the past eight months.

In his capacity as a non-commissioned officer with the Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Houston provides support to soldiers who travel to the Hohenfels Training Area to participate in the exercises held there, including the recent Combined Resolve XIV.

“I focus on logistical support for all national and international forces for this mission. I react to any problems that arise which could inhibit the success of our mission,” Houston said. “It’s been a huge challenge for me because I’m a line (combat) soldier. This is a whole different ballgame. It’s more mental than physical.”

Houston was born in Reno but graduated from Churchill County High in 2013. He enlisted in the Army in 2013 and completed his initial training as a tanker at Ft. Benning, Georgia. Houston has traveled to 11 countries since leaving Northern Nevada to begin his Army career seven years ago. Although he has not been able return to Fallon since 2017, it still holds a special place in his heart.

“I consider Fallon home because that’s where I felt like I grew the most as a person,” Houston said.

Houston said he plans to once again become an armor tank commander at his next duty station. He also plans to move on to his “broadening assignment” such as a combat training instructor or a drill sergeant noting that these are necessary steps that allow soldiers to gain additional skills to complement their primary military occupation skills and knowledge, a vital part of achieving promotions.

Houston’s short-term goals are simple ones. He hopes to carve out some time in the near future to visit his loved ones. In the long-term, Houston plans to remain in the Army and work his way up the ranks in the organization.

“My ultimate goal is to become a sergeant major one day,” Houston said. “I want to make an impact and shape positive changes in the Army.”