Carson City parks create standard signage | NevadaAppeal.com

Carson City parks create standard signage

Carson City is working to create a standard for signs in the city's parks, facilities and open space.

A new master plan for signage that creates a flexible design to be used for all types of signs and literature was approved by both the Open Space Advisory Committee and the Parks and Recreation Commission, which held a joint meeting on Monday.

The city contracted for the new design with Design Workshop, which held meetings with parks and recreation stakeholders.

"Sign consistency came out as a priority," said Ben Fish, operations manager in Design Workshop's Stateline office.

Signs throughout Carson City's recreation system are all over the map in terms of design, using different typefaces, colors and overall look.

The one exception is the monument sign that identify city parks, including Fuji Park and Silver Saddle Ranch, and city facilities, including the Aquatic Facility.

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Those signs may be the first tackled as the fix is relatively easy. The designer suggested the type on the signs be painted either "fireweed red" to indicate a open space or dark green to identify a public park, a color scheme proposed for all signs.

The remaining signs will be changed over time as need and funding allows. Riverview Park, at 5th Street, for instance, is littered with signs that all look different and would be a priority, said Jennifer Budge, director, Parks, Recreation & Open Space.

Budge said some budget money would be set aside. Funding can also come through grants for parks and open space projects as they arise, said Ann Bollinger, open space administrator.

Another idea was proposed by Donna Inverson, member of the open space committee, who said businesses and recreation groups could sponsor signs.

The two panels also voted to recommend amendments to the Unified Pathways Master Plan. The amendments incorporate the results of the Eagle Valley trails inventory, adding the non-motorized trail system. The recommendation goes to the Planning Commission, then to the Board of Supervisors for approval.