Governor | NevadaAppeal.com

Governor

Craig Bergland

Age: 57

Hometown: Reno

Occupation: Teacher, casino worker, artist

Family: Mother, brothers and sisters, son, daughter-in-law, and brand new granddaughter

Political background: Green Party, ran for Reno mayor in 1998, withdrew in support of another candidate.

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Tell us about yourself:

Most of my life has been spent working with alternatives. My home includes a solar water heater, hand-built solar air window boxes, and a large library of conservation and energy related materials. I’m running to alert our people about Peak Oil Production, and the urgency to reduce our wasteful consumption of non-replaceable, one-time fossil fuels. I drive a moped, cook solar when possible, conserve, and read extensively such wonderful publications as “Plan B” by Lester R. Brown, as well as scary ones like “The Long Emergency”, and “The Empty Tank.” My most stimulating and creative education was being a participant in the Experimental College at UNR in the ’70’s.

The state is expected to hit the statutory cap on spending next year with growth in caseload, roll-ups and inflation demanding either that population growth plus inflation be exceeded or that some parts of the budget be reduced. As governor, what would you do to balance the state’s needs against the cap? Is the cap realistic? If cuts are necessary, where would those cuts be made?

I will gather the best and brightest minds in the state of Nevada, from ALL parties and sectors, and consider all ideas and input to guide our ship of state into the future. And, we will eventually not only lower taxes through efficiency, but also reduce the cost of power to our people. I will use Governor Guinn’s projected budget for the next two years (which he has thoughtfully left our state as a gift), and consult with him also, in the future.

What would be your top priorities for new, expanded or restructured programs if elected governor? In other words, why do you want to be governor?

My top priority is energy independence for Nevada in the next 10 years. I will create the Office of Emergency Technology for our state and people – to disseminate and use this technology – and urge and foster participation in NNEMA (Nevada Neighborhood Emergency Management Association).

FEMA is broke and broken, and we cannot expect FEMA to turn off each of our power, gas and electric services in the event of a disaster, much less even provide us with emergency drinking water or other necessities. It is up to us to know how to do this, as well as work with our neighbors in the event of a catastrophe. This is a real project which will continue to grow regardless of the outcome of this election.

Also, we must save the Lake Tahoe basin before it burns up.

What sets you apart from your opponent?

I would rather talk about ideas than positions. I have not raised huge campaign funds, nor promised favors to special interests for their support and money. If my ideas are legitimate, then people will hear them and react.

I have little political experience. However, in this day and age, perhaps not having preconceived notions of governance may actually be a good thing. No one governs alone. The quality of the service by the state of Nevada to its people is made up of each and all of its wonderful state employees. These employees will have my ear, and I will encourage them to be innovative and creative for our common good. My door will always be open.

We are all stewards of this, our planet, and it is our duty to protect and provide for the future generations. We cannot drive our Humvees through those Pearly Gates, but we will be judged on our good deeds, not our greed.

Contact information:

E-mail: craig@bergland4governor.org

Web site: http://www.bergland4governor.org

Jim Gibbons

Age: 61

Hometown: Reno

Occupation: Congressman, Nevada’s 2nd District

Family: Wife Dawn, 3 grown children

Political background: Republican. Three terms Nevada Assembly. I sponsored the Gibbons Tax Restraint Initiative now in our Nevada Constitution, and in 2003 introduced the Education First Initiative that passed in 2004 and that will be on the ballot again in 2006. Ran for governor 1994, defeated. Elected to Congress in 1996 and have served five terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. Currently serving on these committees: House Committee on Homeland Security, Subcommittee on Prevention of Nuclear and Biological Attack, Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment, House Committee on Resources, Subcommittee on Energy & Mineral Resources, Chairman; House Armed Services Committee, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats, and Capabilities, Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces

Tell us about yourself:

I’m a native of Sparks and a graduate of Sparks High School and the University of Nevada, Reno, where I earned a bachelor’s of science in Geology and a master’s of science in mining/geology. I received my law degree at Southwestern University. I’ve served as a geologist for mining companies and as a hydrologist for the federal water master in Reno. I’ve also worked as an attorney representing the mining industry, Nevada’s second largest industry.

My military career spanned 29 years, from the U.S. Air Force in Vietnam to flight leader in the Nevada Air National Guard in Iraq and Kuwait during Operation Desert Storm. I flew commercially as an airline pilot for Frontier Airlines and then Delta Airlines.

My political career started in 1996 when my wife, Dawn, urged me to run for the Nevada Assembly. I served three terms, with Dawn taking my seat while I was serving in the Persian Gulf.

I enjoy hunting, fishing and golf, but the most important part of my life is my family.

The state is expected to hit the statutory cap on spending next year with growth in caseload, roll-ups and inflation demanding either that population growth plus inflation be exceeded or that some parts of the budget be reduced. As governor, what would you do to balance the state’s needs against the cap? Is the cap realistic? If cuts are necessary, where would those cuts be made?

Our state must first make good on its commitments today before we make any new promises. As I have said from the very beginning of this campaign, our state must learn to live within its means. As your next governor of Nevada, I will continue with this philosophy.

In regards to the statutory cap, I think as your next Governor I will work with the current administration’s budget for the next biennium to live within this cap. If this becomes an insurmountable obstacle, then I will work with the Legislature to identify ways to protect current funding levels. If that continues to hamper the ability of our state to meet our current commitments and needs within Nevada, then and only then, will I look at the feasibility of the statutory cap.

What would be your top priorities for new, expanded or restructured programs if elected governor? In other words, why do you want to be governor?

My number-one priority is education. I want to assure that every Nevadan is educated to his or her potential, and I have several suggestions for how to do that.

We must do a better job of preparing our public school students for college. I believe we can start by giving merit pay to outstanding teachers, by giving principals more accountability for their schools and by improving efficiency to see to it that more of our taxpayer dollars actually make it to the classroom, where it pays off in our students’ education.

I want to apply this same principle of efficiency to all of state government, improving the delivery of essential services while keeping our taxes low.

I also hope to start Nevada on the road toward energy independence. In Congress, I wrote legislation which has become law that makes Nevada’s vast geothermal resources more economically viable for electricity production. As governor, I would continue to work with business to invest in Nevada’s abundant source of clean energy. I would also support efforts to convert fossil fuels to gasoline and diesel in Nevada through clean technology.

Above all, I want to give Nevadans access, affordability and accountability in state government.

What sets you apart from your opponent?

Our basic approaches to government are quite different. My opponent’s history indicates she believes that government can be the solution to our problems. On the other hand, I’m more inclined to blame government for being the problem. I believe we should live within our means, and my record in government backs up my standing as a fiscal conservative. It sounds simplistic, but I’ll save you money; she’ll cost you money.

Another difference is that I have represented all 17 counties of Nevada, including part of Clark County, while she has only represented part of Clark County. Consequently, I am more familiar with the issues, needs, and economic interests of the entire state.

Contact information:

Telephone: (775) 322-4546

E-mail: lwood@gibbonsfornevada.com

Dina Titus

Age: 56

Hometown: Las Vegas, 30 years

Occupation: Professor of Political Science

Family: Married to Professor Thomas C. Wright; Father, Joe Titus; Mother, Betty Titus.

Political background: Democrat; served in Nevada Legislature since 1988; Senate Minority leader since 1992.

Tell us about yourself:

I grew up in a small town in South Georgia which was very similar to rural Nevada – only instead of cantaloupe and alfalfa, we had cotton and peanuts.

I have taught political science at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas for nearly 30 years.

I’m a strong advocate for early-childhood education initiatives such as smaller class sizes and full-day kindergarten. I have also worked to protect Nevada’s most vulnerable citizens – seniors – sponsoring legislation them to purchase less expensive prescription drugs from Canada, mandating enhanced penalties for identity theft and doubling penalties crimes against disabled persons. I’ve also helped crack down on sexual predators, increasing penalties and requiring lifetime supervision of their conduct.

When rising property taxes threatened Nevada families, I proposed a freeze on valuation that led to the Legislature capping increases. I have also been an advocate of “smart growth” and protection of Nevada’s natural treasures.

I earned my bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary, my master’s degree from the University of Georgia and my Ph.D. from Florida State University. I’ve published two non-fiction books and numerous scholarly articles, and enjoy tap dancing and traveling as hobbies.

The state is expected to hit the statutory cap on spending next year with growth in caseload, roll-ups and inflation demanding either that population growth plus inflation be exceeded or that some parts of the budget be reduced. As governor, what would you do to balance the state’s needs against the cap? Is the cap realistic? If cuts are necessary, where would those cuts be made?

With continued growth in revenue as sales and gaming taxes come in higher than expected, it is likely that approximately $2 million will be outside the cap. This can be used for buildings and highway construction. No programs will have to be cut in this biennium. Remember, the cap applies only to the budget submitted by the governor, not passed by the Legislature. Audits performed regularly by the Legislature provide guidelines for more efficiency and economy within agencies.

What would be your top priorities for new, expanded or restructured programs if elected governor?

My plan for Nevada’s future is based on five Es Ð education, economic development, energy, the environment and ethics.

Education must be Nevada’s top priority – with all-day kindergarten, increased vocational training and endowment of the Millennium Scholarship among the steps to a seamless P-16 system.

We need economic development with a laser focus, attracting businesses which bring new technology and high-paying jobs with good benefits.

Nevada should be the nation’s leader in developing renewable energy technologies, capitalizing on our solar, wind and geothermal resources. As governor, I would hold a renewable energy summit in the first 100 days of my administration – bringing together researchers and businesses to develop practical plans. We also need a Public Utilities Commission which is more responsive to the public than the utilities.

We need to protect our environment to safeguard our quality of life – making neighborhoods safer by reducing toxins, traffic congestion and air pollution, managing our limited water resources and preserving our natural treasures for all to enjoy.

And we must restore faith in government by holding public officials to the highest ethical standards, prohibiting “pay to play” contributions and prosecuting all violations of ethics and disclosure laws.

What sets you apart from your opponent?

My experience – both in the classroom and in the Legislature – makes me the best candidate for governor. While I’ve been on the front lines in Nevada, my opponent has been on the back bench in Washington, D.C. I know the budget, the issues and the players and am ready to hit the ground running. I’ve served on numerous statewide committees and have first-hand experience with the issues of greatest importance to Nevadans like health care, education and the environment. I have the skills, the experience and the commitment to lead this state into the future.

Contact information:

Telephone: (702) 798-8348.

Las Vegas Office: (702) 369-0074

Reno office: (775) 323-2006

E-mail: dina@dinatitus.com