Homecoming ‘bigger than prom’ | NevadaAppeal.com

Homecoming ‘bigger than prom’

Aly Lawson | alawson@lahontanvalleynews.com
Churchill County High School Student Council is preparing for next week’s homecoming — this year’s theme is “Board Games” to go along with focusing on the game. Officers from left are Emily Marshall, Lesley Duenas, Dawson Frost, AmiDayne Nelsen, Kamryn Rutledge, Ali Pokrandt, Dylan Kubeny and Kiley Woolsey, front.
Aly Lawson / LVN |

Churchill County High School Homecoming is Monday through Friday, kicking off with the parade on Monday at 5:30 p.m. and culminating in the varsity football game Friday at 7 p.m. against Spring Creek High School.

The parade starts at Millennium Park, moving across Williams Avenue then down Maine Street to Churchill County Middle School. Businesses are encouraged to don exterior decorations. Besides Greenwave colors, this year’s theme is “Board Games” and promotes focusing on the game.

Also each school day is a dress-up day with Monday Candyland, Twister Tuesday, Monopoly Wednesday, Operation Thursday and Friday “Extreme Green” for pulling on school colors green and white.

Terri Pearson, CCHS Student Council adviser, said in keeping with tradition, the fire department will pick up select Council members from each grade in the city’s old fire engine in order for them to dye the Maine Street fountain green on Monday at 11:30 a.m. Mayor Ken Tedford and the City Council will help make this outing possible, including waving and honking from the truck as well as taking the students to lunch afterward.

All games will take place at the Edward Arciniega Athletic Complex, and the homecoming dance will be in the school cafeteria.

Tuesday’s Powder Puff flag football game between the junior and senior girls starts at 6:30 p.m. followed by a bonfire for students and staff with popcorn, cocoa and coach speeches. The game serves as fundraiser for scholarships and Block F.

Wednesday at 8 p.m., there’s a lip sync show in the auditorium. The cost is $5, and access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Those wanting to attend may start lining up at 6 p.m. Teachers judge performers on specified categories and school-appropriate requirements. Last year’s Student Council president Nichole Mariezcurrena will help judge. The contest fundraises for the local Meals on Wheels program.

The freshmen football game is at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday. On Friday, the junior varsity football game starts at 4:30 p.m.

Homecoming royalty will be featured during the varsity game’s halftime show including cheerleaders and the marching band. The roles are a freshman, sophomore and junior prince and princess each as well as three senior princes and princesses who are voted for to become homecoming king and queen. The king and queen results will be announced during the midfield crowning ceremony.

All games will take place at the Edward Arciniega Athletic Complex, and the homecoming dance will be in the school cafeteria.

“Homecoming here is bigger than prom,” said Kiley Woolsey, Student Council president, whose two older sisters were also presidents.

Woolsey has been going to homecoming events since fourth grade, she said, joining her siblings in the various celebrations.

“It’s cool seeing how it varies every year,” she said, “different speeds, different themes.”

She added that being in a small town is great, and she loves seeing the local businesses support the Greenwave, for example with their electronic signs.

Homecoming is an annual tradition in the country this time of year, when schools and cities come together to welcome back alumni and former residents.