Marshall discusses new opportunities after 2018 election | NevadaAppeal.com

Marshall discusses new opportunities after 2018 election

Steve Ranson
LVN Editor Emeritus
Nathan Strong, left, executive director of the Churchill Economic Development Authority, speaks with Lt. Gov. Kate Marshall at Saturday’s Churchill County Democrats Bryan-Sawyer Dinner.
Steve Ranson / LVN

Lt. Gov. Kate Marshall said the state’s Democrats should be proud of the short distances of opportunity that have been created because of the 2018 elections.

The first-term lieutenant governor spoke at this year’s annual Bryan-Sawyer Dinner hosted by the Churchill County Democrats on Saturday at the Fallon Convention Center. Marshall, who spoke several years ago at the annual dinner, which is named after two popular governors, discussed new opportunities for people whether they are new to this country or are trying to improve their lives. She speaks from experience. Her grandfather immigrated to the United States in 1921 to escape the aftermath of World War I.

Marshall said her grandfather worked hard, achieved an education and became a truck driver, earning a wage to be a productive citizen. She said after her great grandmother passed her citizenship exam, she also became a new American. Marshall also referred to opportunities that have been afforded to all Americans. She said at one time high-school or college graduates were able to find employment after receiving their degrees and make a living wage.

“When you voted in 2018, you brought it back right now with a female majority in the Legislature … and they’re raising the minimum wage,” Marshall pointed out.

According to Marshall, corporate America has it right that when wages increase, they also affect other wages. She said a single mother living in today’s society is not making a minimum wage she she’s paid $7.25 an hour. Marshall also referred to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, which created Social Security. She said Roosevelt’s intent was to allow Americans to retire with dignity. The plan called for citizens to have a small amount deducted from their paychecks, and after they retired, they would begin receiving a pension. Likewise, one of Marshall’s campaign promises that may come to fruition is working with the private sector to develop a similar retirement plan for its employees.

Marshall also outlined several other plans she is developing such as an education circulator in Clark County that would provide transportation between college campuses and creating an Office of Small Business Advocate.

The evening also provided to other speakers. Kimi Cole, chair of the Rural Nevada Democratic Caucus who has frequently visited Churchill County, discussed what it’s like to be a Democrat in rural Nevada.

“We may have different perspectives, but we talk to work it out,” she said.

Cole said she’s been working with a number of Democratic candidates who are running for president to setup either in-person visits or to arrange for teleconferences with a link to all the counties.

“We’re looking at our own democracy with the ability to participate,” she said.

Kelli Kelly, the Fallon Food Hub manager, discussed her candidacy for Churchill County Commission District 3. Filing, though, won’t begin until March 2020. Kelly said she wants all of Churchill County to have a voice in the election because previous elections for a county commissioner have been decided in the primary election. She wants to change that by giving voters a choice in the general election.

“An investment with me is an investment in all of us,” she said.

Chairwoman Nyla Howell, who was recently re-elected for a two-year term, recognized guests from the local and state Democratic party, representatives from the Reno offices of Sens. Catherine Cortez-Masto and Jacky Rosen, several state constitutional offices and also a dozen Fallon Republicans who attended the dinner. Furthermore, she recognized Larry Jackson and Jeanette Strong, who are outgoing Churchill County committee members, for their years of service.