NHP increases emphasis on ‘Move Over Law’ | NevadaAppeal.com

NHP increases emphasis on ‘Move Over Law’

Staff Report
The Nevada Highway Patrol has increased enforcement of the state’s “Move Over Law.”
Steve Ranson / LVN

The Nevada Highway Patrol is increasing its enforcement efforts of the “Move Over Law” throughout Nevada, including the rural parts of the state.

“We are going to be doing an operation in the Fernley/Fallon area on Friday for the ‘Move Over’ law,” said Trooper Matt McLaughlin, NHP spokesman.

While NHP continues to conduct traffic stops on a daily basis for a multitude of violations, the focus during this period is this important law that is frequently ignored by motorists.

Since 2003, McLaughlin said Nevada law has required drivers to slow down, proceed with caution, and when possible, move to the far lane when passing an official emergency response vehicle that is pulled over on the side of the road with flashing emergency lights. This includes law enforcement vehicles, fire trucks, ambulances and tow trucks.

Beginning July 1, 2017, he said Nevada Revised Statute 484B.607 expanded the law to require drivers to do the same for Nevada Department of Transportation vehicles stopped on the side of the road with their flashing amber or non-flashing blue lights on. This includes Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) vehicles.

“Every year, first responders are injured or killed when motorists fail to slow down and move over,” McLaughlin said. “While this law has been around for over 15 years, the Nevada Highway Patrol continues to see motorists that do not even make a reasonable effort to move over on a regular basis.”

McLaughlin said the increased enforcement effort will be noticed by motorists in both metropolitan areas and in the smaller rural communities.

He said the NHP will also concentrate on the “Lane Loitering” law during the spring.

“We seem to encounter drivers that decide to camp out in the fast lane on a daily basis, especially along U.S. Highway 50 Alternate and on Interstate 80 between Fernley and Sparks,” he said.