Pelzer presents his passion to Fallon | NevadaAppeal.com

Pelzer presents his passion to Fallon

Molly Moser | mmoser@lahontanvalleynews.com

With less than a month until graduation and summer break, a New York Times Bestselling author left Churchill County High School students with straightforward advice on life.

"Knock off the b.s., do something for others, and be the best you can be," said Dave Pelzer, author of "A Child Called It," a NYT Bestseller for over six years.

Although his visit to CCHS was on behalf of Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month and Pinwheels for Prevention, Pelzer ensured each of his presentations to the community on Friday not only increased awareness for child abuse but to also embrace self-empowerment.

Pelzer's book is a memoir about his experience as a victim of child abuse from his alcoholic mother, as she plotted to murder him; she forced him to drink ammonia, starve him, and other physical and emotional abuse factors involved.

Beginning at age 4, Pelzer went through eight years of abuse and is the second oldest of five boys.

"I'm not here to just tell you to stop abuse," he told students. "You know that. You have a purpose and do something for yourself, appreciate what you have, and thank others more often."

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Now, as an author of self-help books and a speaker for schools and events nationwide, Pelzer appreciated Fallon for its familiarity of a neighborly comfort.

After his presentation, he shook about every student's hand that walked by him, including taking a few selfies.

"Small communities care about each other," he said. "It's tight-knit and everybody helps one another here. It's a matter of trust."

Pelzer discussed the normality of life struggles a student or person may face and how decision-making is a crucial skill in life.

"In a time of crisis, I want you to remember to be still," he said. "You have to work towards your success every single day. Be good and respect yourself and others."

Pelzer also spoke to social services and local agencies about identifying abuse, assisting abused youth, and empowering youth. The day wrapped up with an open public presentation at the CCHS gym to increase awareness.

Specifically, the presentations are called The Real Heroes also produced by Pelzer; a tribute to those who dedicated efforts to make a difference for a child, while at the same time educating the general public.

Among many, Pelzer's accomplishments included one of the Ten Outstanding Young Americans, the only American to be honored as The Outstanding Young Person of the World in 1994, and was paid tribute as the recipient of the 2005 National Jefferson Award.