Playing may be why dogs are man’s BFF | NevadaAppeal.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Playing may be why dogs are man’s BFF

Kathleen Williams-Miller
Tiki Bear is a 10-year-old Lhasa Apso mix. He’s a sweet calm boy who serves as the office dog. He was surrendered to CAPS because his person could no longer take care of him. He has been neglected and is looking for a home with someone who will appreciate and love him. You could be that person. Come out and meet this little man; he’s charming and as cute as can be.
Courtesy

Tiki Bear is a 10-year-old Lhasa Apso mix. He’s a sweet calm boy who serves as the office dog. He was surrendered to CAPS because his person could no longer take care of him. He has been neglected and is looking for a home with someone who will appreciate and love him. You could be that person. Come out and meet this little man; he’s charming and as cute as can be.

One aspect of science I admire is the obscure topics that scientists study. The latest discovery is that one of the reasons dogs became man’s best friend is because they could play fetch.

Researchers at Stockholm University have discovered that wolves, our pets’ ancestors, were the first animals tamed by humans over 15,000 years ago. Amazingly, they didn’t have to be taught to chase a stick, because wolves have an innate, playful streak and a willingness to respond to humans.

It was long believed that dogs evolved over hundreds of years to learn to retrieve a stick tossed by their masters; however, the findings from a recent study point to a different theory. The study was conducted on a litter of 13 hand-raised, eight-week-old wolf pups. For the tests, a handler would throw a ball to a pup. If the pup picked up the ball, the pup was encouraged to return it to the handler. The pups were given three chances to retrieve the ball. Of the 13 pups in the test, three brought the ball back one time, and one pup retrieved it in all three trials.

Christina Hansen Wheat, who was the author of the study, says the results suggest that a game of fetch may have been the key to domestication of wolves. It makes sense, because the wolves who responded to the game of fetch were selected for breeding and over time the behavior became automatic. Humans made a connection that altered their relationship with animals.

Clearly, we love our pets because we connect with them and they connect with us too. Speaking of which, I have an adorable brown Lab nudging me and looking toward the refrigerator. Hmm, I think he’s telling me it’s dinner time. We have a great connection, especially when it comes to treats or food.

IN NEED OF

Aluminum cans. If you have cans to pick up, give us a call (775-423-7500), and we will come get them. You can also drop them off at CAPS.

Folks who need help affording spaying/neutering for dogs or cats. The SNAPS program details are below.

SHOUT OUT TO

Adam Trumble and the Lahontan Valley News for giving CAPS a voice in the community. A Four Paw salute to you!

Three Happy Hounds for donating a truck full of food and treats. All tails are wagging for you.

COME SEE US

CAPS will be at Walmart on March 14, with the Kissin’ Booth and a puckered-up pooch. Come by for a pooch smooch. Be sure to check out our merchandise after you get a pooch smooch! Get something for your favorite Leprechaun!

DON’T FORGET

SNAPS is a program offered to Churchill County residents through CAPS that provides low-cost spay/neutering for cats and dogs. To qualify for SNAPS, you need to have one of the following: Medicaid, a child enrolled in NV Check Up Program, food stamps, 2019 tax return stating income is less than $30,000 or Veterans disability card including a photo ID. Also required are a Churchill County ID and a co-pay. For more information, call CAPS at 423-7500.

To donate directly to CAPS on Facebook by just hitting the donate button. You are our guardian angels, and we thank you for your support!

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likeable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me, jkwmil@outlook.com.