The invasion of robot cats and dogs | NevadaAppeal.com

The invasion of robot cats and dogs

Kathleen Williams-Miller
Scooby is a darling two-year-old bullmastiff mix. He’s lots of fun and loves to go out and about. He’s so thrilled to go on walk that he pulls a bit on the leash, but with a little training he would be the perfect walking partner. He’s looking for someone to have fun with; it could be you. Come out and meet him; he’s ready to go home.
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Watson here and if the news gets any scarier, I just may have to quit watching TV with my dad. The latest scare is robotic cats and dogs. Yep, scientists are working on mechanical animals that meow, bark, play and purr. Why in the world are they doing this? I can play and bark without using batteries.

After doing a little research I was able to discover some good reasons. Many older folks need extra help so they move into assisted living homes. Some develop a disease called Alzheimer’s that affects memory and critical thinking skills. Unfortunately, many assisted living homes don’t allow pets. For pet owners, this is a traumatic move.

Tom Stevens was faced with the dilemma of moving his mom, who had Alzheimer’s, and was heartbroken to give up her dog. So, with the help of Jim Henderson’s Creature Shop, Tom created Jenny, a lifelike puppy. She moves like a real dog and responds to touch and voice commands. Jenny has provided comfort and company to Tom’s mom. You can see Jenny by typing in YouTube Jenny robot dog.

Cats have also been developed that can keep a person company, remind them to take their medicines and even help them find their glasses. “Joy for All” was developed by Hasbro and scientists at Brown University. It purrs and meows and even appears to lick its paw and roll over for a belly rub.

The hope is that creating an interaction with the pet requiring human input will help assuage feelings of loneliness, depression and anxiety. You can check out the “Joy for All” cat on YouTube Joy for All cat.

I’m not a robot dog but I can appreciate the joy robot dogs and cats bring to folks who can’t have a pet.

XOXO Watson

IN NEED OF

Volunteers for the CAPS booth at Walmart days once a month. Call 775-423-1814 for details.

Dog walkers: we desperately need volunteers to walk and socialize our dogs. Call 775-423-7500 for details.

Pine shavings for guests’ kennels.

Bleach to clean guests’ kennels.

Sturdy Kong type dog toys for our guests.

SHOUT OUT TO

To Diane Peters for her generous donations for an emergency surgery for Hoss and veterinary bills. Paws applause to you!

To Rema White for the huge bag of cans. A big bark of thanks to you!

COME SEE US

CAPS will be at Walmart on Feb. 8, with the Kissin’ Booth and a puckered-up pooch. Come by for a pooch smooch. Be sure to check out our merchandise after you get a pooch smooch! Get something for your Valentine.

DON’T FORGET

January Pet Holiday: National Pet Your Pet Month.

You can get your animals spay/neutered for free. This is a limited time offer until the funds run out. Apply soon or you will miss your chance. Call 775-423-7500 for details.

To donate directly to CAPS on Facebook by just hitting the donate button. You are our guardian angels, and we thank you for your support!

You can open an account with Chewy and reference; CAPS in the order. CAPS will receive $20 directly into the operating account with your first $50 order. Chewy offers quality food and free two-day delivery on orders over $50. Check our Facebook page, Churchill Animal Protection Society, for more details.

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likeable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me, jkwmil@outlook.com.