This year is going to the dogs | NevadaAppeal.com

This year is going to the dogs

Kathleen Williams-Miller
Looking for a home: Fifty, a beautiful Lab-Catahoula mix, is six years old. He is a “special needs” guy because he is deaf and almost completely blind. Fifty needs someone who wants a companion to love. He is very sweet and would be perfect in a quiet home with no other animals or children. Fifty is waiting for that special someone. It could be you. Come out and meet him.
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Chinese New Year, or “Spring Festival,” is the most important holiday in China, and it starts today. It is the year of the dog. In Chinese astrology, each year relates to a Chinese zodiac animal: dog, pig, rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, and rooster.

The animals rotate on a 12-year cycle, so every 12 years the sign you were born in is celebrated.

Zodiac signs in the Western world are based on constellations, and there are 12 each year. Your sign depends on the month and date you were born. Both systems purport to describe the characteristics you are born with. If you were born in 1934, 1946, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006 or 2018, you were born in the year of the dog.

Dogs are loyal, honest, amiable and kind. They also cam be cautious and prudent. Because of a strong sense of loyalty and sincerity, they will do everything for a person they think is important. That sure sounds like Watson; he has all of those attributes!

Born with a good nature, dogs are not criminals or dishonest. Mostly, they need a quiet life, a good family, and kindness. Overall, dogs enjoy good health and tend to be happy all the time. The best careers for dogs include police officer, scientist, nurse, judge and professor.

From the sounds of it, I think everyone would benefit from being born in a dog year. If you would like to check out your zodiac animal go to http://www.chinahighlights.com/travel/guide/chinazodica. Type in your birthday and it will calculate what zodiac animal you are. I want to be a dog; how about you?

IN NEED OF

Vendors for Bark in the Park to be held on May 5. We would like a huge variety of goods and services. Please contact Karen at 775-423-7500.

Your current address for our newsletter database. We have had problems with our computer, and many of our addresses disappeared. Please email us at caps@cccomm.net with your name and address if you would like to receive our newsletters. We do not share or sell our list. You also can call us at 775-423-7500.

Kennel help. We have two paid positions. If you are interested, drop off your resume at CAPS or stop by to apply in person.

Aluminum cans, which we recycle to augment our shelter funds. We can now pick up cans because our trailer has been fixed. If you have cans to pick up, call 775-423-7500.

Volunteers to help build kennels. Call 775-423-7500 for details.

SHOUT OUT TO

The Police Department wives for their excellent fundraising. We appreciate your generous donation of $500. Your commitment to our community is inspiring. A Four Paws Salute to you!

COME SEE US

CAPS will be at Walmart on Saturday with the Kissin’ Booth and a puckered-up pooch. Come by to get your pooch smooch. We have colorful caps, shirts, and mugs, so be sure to check out the merchandise after you have loved on our pup.

DON’T FORGET

February Pet Holidays:

Pet Dental Health Month.

Flower Tree Nursery will be raffling a 20-gallon tree on March 15, and the winner doesn’t have to be present to win. The raffle tickets are available at Flower Tree, and they are $1 for one ticket and $5 for six tickets.

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Do you have questions, comments or a great story? Contact me at jkwmil@outlook.com.

Kathleen Williams-Miller, a CAPS volunteer, contributed this week’s column.