Thunder, lightning and exploding sounds | NevadaAppeal.com

Thunder, lightning and exploding sounds

Kathleen Williams-Miller
Atom, a handsome 8-year-old domestic short hair orange tabby, is a very friendly guy. He loves to cuddle, talk and birdwatch. He will give you a high five for food. Atom is diabetic and must have insulin shots twice a day. Come out and meet him; he’ll tell you a story.

While sitting at the dog park the other day, Denise happened to mention how terrified her dog Belle gets because of thunder, lightning and fireworks. Her other dog, Millie, isn’t bothered at all. Watson is frightened of loud sounds and flashing lights, too. In fact, he becomes a panicked, panting pup during a storm or fireworks display.

Dogs can sense bad weather coming long before humans are aware of it. Perhaps you have observed your dog pacing, his tail down and verbalizing. This behavior indicates the storm is coming soon.

Humans see lightning, but new research reveals that dogs feel it. As a storm rolls in, the barometric pressure and ions in the atmosphere change. All this change causes external signals to travel through their nervous system more quickly.

Static electricity builds up in the clouds and eventually bursts into lightning. Long before the lightning strikes, your dog can feel it generating an unpleasant tingling sensation through his fur. Occasionally, people feel this, too, on the hair at the nape of the neck.

Many dogs freak out during a thunderstorm and attempt to become grounded by getting as low as possible. Belle hides in the closet, and Watson hunkers down by me. I have been swaddling him with a towel, but he is still fearful. During the last storm, I did buy some “Happy Traveler” natural calming capsules, and I was amazed by how well they worked.

I suspect the reason some dogs are afraid of fireworks stems from associating flashing lights and loud sound with the uncomfortable sensations they experience during a storm. There are many products on the market for dogs and cats that help with anxiety. At this point, I have only tried one but I will do anything to help Watson weather the storm because he’s my BFF.

LOOKING FOR A HOME

We have four darling puppies. Policy, however, prohibits adopting out puppies or kittens under the age of 6 months to a home with children under 5 years of age. This is to protect both the children and the animal. Call 775-423-7500 for details.

IN NEED OF

Garage sale items. We need gently used appliances, furniture, treadmills and miscellaneous items. We don’t need clothing. Call us at 755-423-7500 and we will pick it up.

Folks who need help affording spaying/neutering for dogs or cats. The SNAPS program details are below.

SHOUT OUT TO

Hoofbeats Gates and Corrals for their help completing our kennels. All tails are wagging for you!

Daniel Andersen, who is an Eagle Scout candidate, for his amazing agility course. A Four Paw salute to you!

Eagle Scouts, Boy Scouts and parents for all their assistance. A pooch smooch to you!

COME SEE US

CAPS will be at Walmart on July 6 with the Kissin’ Booth and a puckered-up pooch. Come by and smooch our pooch. We have hoodies, shirts and hats. Be sure to check out our merchandise after you’ve hugged our pup.

DON’T FORGET

June Pet Holiday: Ugliest Dog Day, June 21.

SNAPS is a program offered to Churchill County residents through CAPS that provides low-cost spay/neutering for cats and dogs. To qualify for SNAPS, you need to have one of the following: Medicaid, a child enrolled in NV Check Up Program, food stamps, 2018 tax return stating income is less than $30,000 or Veterans disability card including a photo ID. Also required are a Churchill County ID and a co-pay. For information, call CAPS at 775-423-7500.

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, Nev. 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me, jkwmil@outlook.com.