Carson City ready for motorcycle races | NevadaAppeal.com

Carson City ready for motorcycle races

Teri Vance
Special to the Appeal
Jimmy Filice (111), of Dayton, and other riders practice at Fuji Park for this weekend’s Outlaw Motorcycle Flat Track Races. Tickets for Saturday night’s event are available at visitcarsoncity.com.
Shannon Litz |

Motorcyclists, ranging from expert and four-time U.S. champion Jimmy Filice to first-timers, used the weekend to break in the track for Carson City’s inaugural flat track races.

“It’s an American sport that started in the early 1900s, similar to NASCAR,” Filice said. “It’s like apple pie. Spectators are going to see some tight, close racing. Maybe some bumping into each other.”

The Outlaw Motorcycle Flat Track Races will be 7 p.m. Saturday at Fuji Park. Tickets are $15 or $40 for VIP. With the purchase of an adult ticket on visitcarsoncity.com, receive a free ticket for a child 12 and under.

Brendon Borrego, of Reno, was among a group of participants who helped break in the track for Saturday’s performance.

A motocross racer, Borrego is new to the sport of flat track.

“Instead of going cross country, you’re making left-hand turns,” he said. “It’s racing to see who corners better.”

According the American Motorcyclist Association, the sport has roots “dating back to the first two-wheel speed demons in the 1920s.

“Flat Track is widely regarded as the most prestigious and competitive form of dirt track motorcycle racing in the world. A lot has changed over the last 90 years, but the spirit of the sport remains as perhaps the truest, purest test of man and machine.”

Event promoter Robert Hansen said the venue will be ready for the big show.

“We’re getting the track dialed in,” he said. “We’re trying to get moisture down below the surface and work out any issues we see before next weekend. This is going to be the perfect place for it.”

After taking some laps on the course, racer C.J. LaCruze was impressed.

“It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s slick like it’s supposed to be.”

Amateurs will race during the day, with the professional races and amateur finals being featured in the evening performance.

“It’s a very close course, and everything is happening right in front of you,” Hansen said. “There’s a lot of bumping and mashing going on. A lot of action in a very small place.”