Developer may donate Clear Creek drainage to Forest Service | NevadaAppeal.com

Developer may donate Clear Creek drainage to Forest Service

by Jeff Munson, Staff Writer

The owners of a proposed golf course and housing development above Jacks Valley in north Douglas County are considering donating 900 acres near the development to the U.S. Forest Service.

The meadow area serves as the drainage for Clear Creek and had previously been offered for sale to the Forest Service.

However, Jeff Dingman, the developer of the Clear Creek Ranch golf course and housing project, says he’ll donate the land in exchange for some leeway for his fledgling development.

“We’re considering donating it in exchange for additional consideration from Douglas County in the hopes to accommodate the creation of public lands,” Dingman said Friday.

Last week, Douglas County planning commissioners rejected Dingman’s request to allow early construction of the golf course. Commissioners argued they wanted to see a design review plan.

The U.S. Forest Service on Wednesday will ask the Carson Water Subconservancy District if it wants to participate in a multi-agency agreement to help manage the Clear Creek drainage and meadow area near the proposed golf course and subdivision.

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Last month, the Clear Creek Ranch owners met with the Forest Service, Washoe Tribe and Douglas County to discuss an offer to sell a portion of the drainage property, which has erosion problems.

After a discussion, the consensus then among the Forest Service, Washoe Tribe and Douglas County was the property would better be suited in private ownership and maintained by public agencies.

The Forest Service has concerns over whether the property fits its criteria for purchase and will ask Douglas County, the Washoe Tribe and the Carson Water Subconservancy District whether it would be better to form a partnership, Subconservancy Director Ed James said.

Before the Forest Service considers acquiring the property, it wants a commitment of other agencies to help manage it, James said.

The Subconservancy meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Nevada State Legislative office, room 3138, at 401 S. Carson St. in Carson City.

The property could be broken into three segments, according to James. The western portion consists mostly of hilly forest land. The central portion includes a meadow and a segment of Clear Creek. The eastern portion consists of additional hills and trees. No development can occur on the western and eastern portions.

After the Forest Service review, officials said the eastern parcel would best fit the agency’s criteria, but said the west portion sits too close to the proposed golf course and housing development.

Forest Service officials said they are concerned about acquiring the meadow and the portion of land surrounding Clear Creek because the Forest Service doesn’t have the resources to restore or maintain the meadow.

IF YOU GO

What: Carson Water Subconservancy District meeting

When: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday

Where: Nevada State Legislature, Room 3138, 401 S. Carson St., Carson City