Music for your memory: Remember Jones | NevadaAppeal.com

Music for your memory: Remember Jones

Kyler Klix
kklix@swiftcom.com

Big sound, style and super soul music packed in a 12-piece band. Remember Jones is ready to captivate Carson City with its powerful performance.

The band gets the big sound from an ensemble of an explosive brass section, a dynamic six-piece rhythm section and soulful female backing vocals.

And one man leads it all: Remember Jones (whose real name is Anthony D'Amato). But Remember Jones is more than just a singer.

"I like to say that storytelling is my first instrument, and singing is second," he said.

Remember Jones is like a conductor on stage, directing the large group of musicians in the direction it needs to go.

"In this scenario I'm a band leader, and sort of hype man," he said. "I'm jogging in place the entire set."

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With so much energy coming from the band, Remember Jones connects it with the audience. He wants to break the fourth wall and make people feel included in the show.

"I would say music is a collaborative experience," he said. "It feels like soul revival, almost church-like, in its presentation. With all the instruments and all the energy, it sucks people into the performance."

Remember Jones' influences have become part of the band's showmanship. He said he always loved the big sound coming from Motown. The horns and backup vocals that gave Motown their sound were integral to what Remember Jones wanted to create.

"That's what I envisioned for it," he said. "Big sound and horns and backup vocals were always part of the band to me."

The atmosphere Remember Jones brings is similar to a theatrical production. With a background in theater and experience in previous bands, he put together a show band that's more than just music. He says Tina Turner, Freddie Mercury and Motown bands are some of the inspiration that helped inspire Remember Jones.

Motown's inspiration also trickled down right to the way Remember Jones dresses. The first thing an audience will notice before the band plays a note is how snazzy they're dressed. But he says the style fits the music and vice versa.

"Looking good — that's important to me," he said. "We're matching the sound to the of the music to our style. Our suits reflect the sound — it's very sharp."

'BACK TO BLACK' OPENER

Remember Jones' repertoire includes the band doing a version of the late Amy Winehouse's album "Back To Black." The band will open the night by covering her album. He says people enjoy hearing Winehouse's music live with the full band.

"We stay very authentic to the sound, and it's a really cool experience," he said.