Nevada Appeal at 150: Jan. 1, 1929: What will we do with the new year? | NevadaAppeal.com

Nevada Appeal at 150: Jan. 1, 1929: What will we do with the new year?

Could anything have been more appropriate or significant than the naming of January, the first month of the year, after the Roman deity Janus — the god of all beginnings — the god with two opposite faces, one looking back into the past and the other facing forward.

Isn’t that the cue for you and me and for every one else as we begin this new year of 1929? Should we not be as Janus, looking backward and looking forward, studying the past for the lessons it will teach, and facing the future with hope, strength, and confidence? This is a good time to review the past, not only the past year but the past life. What things have we done, what things have we undone? What have we learned from the things done and from things undone? Based on all that has gone before, what will we do with 1929? What will we do for ourselves, for our families, for mankind?

We have heard the remark, he or she has a past. Who is there who has not a past? One’s past, no matter how ignoble, is a valuable part of his life, because from it he can draw a commendable future.

But in reviewing the past make not the mistake of viewing it with regret. Regrets are useless things; they inject hopelessness into the soul, and waste valuable energy.

Most folks learn through having one’s feet slip, there is no cause to regret the slip. The child learns to walk by falling down. Man learns to live the same way. Repent — face about — but do not regret.

Do not worry about that water that has gone under the bridge; there is more coming down stream; keep your eye on that.

1929 is another year. We have a brand new chance to begin life all over again; you and I; to mold things afresh with the knowledge gained from all our past experience to guide us.

Let us not fret about the mistakes we made in 1928, but make sure we do not repeat them in 1929.

This continues the Appeal’s review of news stories and headlines during its Sesquicentennial year.