Nevada Women’s History Project topic of lecture | NevadaAppeal.com

Nevada Women’s History Project topic of lecture

Guy Clifton
Travel Nevada
The Nevada Women’s History Project was instrumental in having the Sarah Winnemucca statue created to display at Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C., this replica of which is located inside the Nevada State Capitol.
Guy Clifton/Travel Nevada |

AT A GLANCE

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: “Nevada Women’s History Project” by Patti Bernard and Mona Reno.

When: 6:30-8 p.m. March 22. Doors open at 6 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Cost: $8 adults; free for museum members and children 17 and younger.

Contact: Bob Nylen: rnylen@nevadaculture.org 775-687-4810, at ext. 245.

For more than 30 years, the Nevada Women’s History Project has worked to highlight the important — and often unrecognized — roles women played in the history of the Silver State.

The organization, established as a nonprofit in 1994, was the driving force behind the Sarah Winnemucca statue that stands in Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C., and scores of other projects that recognize and celebrate the role women played in Nevada’s history and development.

The story of the Nevada Women’s History Project is the subject of this month’s Frances Humphrey Lecture Series at the Nevada State Museum. The event is from 6 to 8 p.m. on March 22, with the lecture starting at 6:30. Admission is $8 for adults and free for museum members and children 17 and younger.

Patti Bernard, chair of the Nevada Women’s History Project, and past chair Mona Reno will detail the history of the organization, its current activities and its importance in preserving Nevada women’s history.

Bernard is a former history teacher and Washoe County School District administrator. After retiring from the school district, she has devoted much volunteer time to helping the Nevada Women’s History Project fulfill its mission of collecting and sharing Nevada women’s history.

Reno is a retired reference librarian at the Nevada State Library. The research and academic inclination of this organization led her to become a part of it during the time when the Nevada Women’s History Project was pursuing the Sarah Winnemucca statue — a replica of which is on display inside the Nevada State Capitol. She’s the compiler and producer of the book, “It Can Be Done,” which tells the story of the Sarah Winnemucca statue.

During their presentation, Bernard and Reno will also discuss several ongoing projects and give anyone interested in participating information on how to become involved.

Seating for the lecture is limited. Those who wish to attend can reserve their seats by contacting Mary Covington at mcovington@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 224.