Past Pages for March 13-15, 2019 | NevadaAppeal.com

Past Pages for March 13-15, 2019

Sue Ballew
Carson City looking north from the top of the Capitol building in 1871.
Courtesy Nevada State Museum

Wednesday

150 Years Ago

Native born: In Woodward’s Garden, a camel gave birth to a young one. It is the first camel ever born on this coast. There is some doubt as to the paternity, but it is thought to be a cross between the Arabian and Bactrian—one hump and two humped camels.

140 Years Ago

Will orate: Mr. Hugh J. Mohan will deliver the oration at Bodie on St. Patrick’s Day. He will no doubt give the residents of that elevated region a splendid “talk.”

130 Years Ago

Here and there, real estate: Many people wonder why land in California sells for ten times as much as just as good land sells for in Nevada. The reason why is very simple. The people of California are wise men who know how to sell real estate, the people of Nevada are chumps who do not.

110 Years Ago

Jet black marble: W. E. Lindsay, the marble man sold his quarry near Mina to the Davis Bros. of Yerington. This quarry is the only black Egyptian marble workings in the United States. The marble is laced with gold and variegated green and copper colored veins. One block taken out weighed 45 tons.

50 Years Ago

Advertisement: “Silver Spur, Carson City, Nevada—Family fun, youngsters welcome, “Nick Leopardi” glass blower, make your favorite miniature gift; Breakfast ham and eggs 69 cents, party Bingo every day, 20 cents per card…, Drinks ½ price…”

20 Years Ago

Stalker Terror: Comedian Jerry Lewis appeared before the Nevada Assembly to help rally support for tougher anti-stalk law to help avoid the nightmare his family has endured for years. He was the target of a stalker who pleaded guilty in 1995 to felony after stalking and threatening to kill both Lewis and his 7-year old daughter.

Thursday

150 Years Ago

Dog Nuisance: Anybody who rides through Carson Street at a canter or trot on horseback will experience not less than six nor more than a thousand yelping dogs. We expect to see a horseman deliberately dismount, haul out his six-shooter and do away with these good for nothing curs.

140 Years Ago

Going to the bay: Mr. Mighels will leave for San Francisco in search of a sniff of health restoring salt. His wife will accompany him.

130 Years Ago

The game law: The law goes into effect on April 1 through Sept. 1. It prohibits the killing of all kinds of birds, with the exception of mud hens which may be slaughtered at any time.

110 Years Ago

Fountain: A new fountain is to be placed at the junction of King and Carson streets. A humanitarian died and left a large legacy to be used in establishing drinking fountains in different cities of the United States – to be used for men, horses and dogs.

The city will soon have a new fountain made from fine granite, directly before the front door of the Capitol. The bequest for the fountain is $3,000 and installation is free of charge. (Still there, but now on the west side of Carson Street).

50 Years Ago

The last bachelor Beatle: Paul McCartney, the last Beatle bachelor, got married to Linda Eastman. Miss Eastman is a photographer and a daughter of a New York lawyer. The bridegroom’s young female admirers sobbed and clutched bouquets as they push through a police line to McCartney and his bride. On the gateposts outside McCartney’s London home, it said “Paul, we love you.”

20 Years Ago

Memorial for Grace Bordewich: After teaching for 34 years at Carson High School, her memory will last forever in the lives of her former students. Grace Bordewich was 88.

She was a lifelong resident and taught from 1933 to 1965. Students admired her for her love of language and her contagious enthusiasm. A bell was given to Ms. Bordewich by the class of 1944. It says, “Often in our words. Always in our memories. Forever with our gratitude. Grace Bordewich who opened worlds of understanding and appreciation.”

Friday

150 Years Ago

Mustaches: The reasons for wearing a mustache according to “Punch” is to: avoid shaving and catching cold, hide one’s teeth, not to look like an Englishman or look like an artist; because one’s wife likes them, one has delicate lungs, one is a tenor, young ladies admire them and one thinks himself more handsome with one.

140 Years Ago

Will not accept it: Rev. Mr. McLain, of the Presbyterian Church, has resigned to the congregation, but they wisely decline to accept it. It is hoped that he will reconsider his purpose and remain where he is highly esteemed.

130 Years Ago

City Trustees:

Dr. Lee was voted $600 for his services during the smallpox scare.

Permission was granted to George Hawkins to sink an artesian well within city limits, on a street near the old roundhouse.

An ordinance was passed allowing Chas. W. Friend to mount and maintain his telescope on the street just west of his dwelling house for a period of 10 years.

110 Years Ago

A Toast: To a man

Here’s to the man whose hand

Is firm when he clasps your own—

Like a grip of steel

That makes you feel

You’re not in the world alone.

Here’s to the man whose laugh

Puts the somber clouds to rout (sic)—

The man who’s fair

And kind and square

To the one that’s down and out. (Exchange)

50 Years Ago

Apollo flight: After a 10-day space flight, the astronauts parachuted to a pinpoint landing in the Atlantic Ocean where they were hoisted aboard the recovery ship Guadalcanal. For the first time, television recorded the astronauts as they opened their hatch, stepped into life rafts and were lifted up to a hovering chopper.

20 Years Ago

The Comstock: The 1st municipal Kazoo Symphony Orchestra, various morticians, a Canadian and a dog driving a Model T Ford are some of the activities of the Bill Marks Memorial St. Patrick’s Day Parade as it meandered down CC Street in Virginia City. The kazoo orchestra, seven strong, provided musical entertainment at various stops. Then there were the Virginia City Gunslingers and Saloon Girls. John Tyson rode the lead horse saying one liners to people as he passed through the city.

Sue Ballew is the daughter of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.