Perennial candidate? not if he can help it. | NevadaAppeal.com

Perennial candidate? not if he can help it.

Amanda Hammon, Appeal Staff Writer

Neil Weaver is determined not to be viewed as a perennial candidate.

Yet he is running in his third Carson City election. For the first time since he started running for office in 1998, Weaver, a candidate for Ward 3 supervisor, will make it past a primary election.

It’s a good thing, he said, but not for the reason one might think.

“It lets everyone concentrate on the sheriff’s race, which is the important one,” he said.

Weaver, owner of Weaver Aircraft, ran failed election attempts for supervisor in 1998 and for mayor in 2000. He and former planning commissioner Alan Rogers lost their 1998 supervisor bid to Supervisor Pete Livermore, who is seeking a second term, in the primary. He fell last among four candidates for mayor in the 2000 mayoral primary.

After two losses, it was tempting to stay away from Carson’s world of politics. Weaver “hadn’t entertained the idea” of running until the last minute, when he said he was approached by several people who didn’t feel they were properly represented on the city’s Board of Supervisors. They asked him to run again for supervisor.

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He said he dislikes politics. But he equally abhors apathy. While noting that running for and serving in an elected office is time consuming, he said he doesn’t fully understand “with the amount of dissatisfaction” why he is the only candidate this year to contest a sitting supervisor. Ward 1 Supervisor Robin Williamson is running for a second term unopposed.

“Governments thrive on apathy and survive on arrogance, the arrogance of the people not to be involved,” Weaver said.

He won’t take campaign contributions because, he said, “When you take money, they want something.” This makes it hard for him to win, he knows, but he said he really thinks he might this time.

“At 50, I’m hardly a fresh face,” he said. “I think voters are looking for something fresh.”

Weaver doesn’t want to discuss his stance on issues until after the Sept. 3 primary. He hinted that he is against the city’s proposal to sell the city’s fairgrounds for commercial development and said he will continue to push for the Board of Supervisors to have a city attorney rather than representation from the District Attorney’s Office. Also, he said he’s upset with the way supervisors treat recommendations from their various advisory boards and commissions.

Weaver will be on a business trip and will miss today’s Carson City Republican Women’s club candidate forum. The forum, today with social hour at 11 a.m. and lunch at noon, will feature Livermore and Thomas Grady, Bud Southard and Donald Wagner, GOP candidates for Assembly district 38. District 38, the seat being vacated by Assemblyman Joe Dini, serves a portion of east Carson City.

Whereas Weaver said he wants to wait until after the primary to delve into issue discussions, Livermore, 61, will be stumping on the back of five issues: traffic, economic development, open space, public safety and medical care.

“I still believe I can make a difference in Carson City,” Livermore said.

Livermore, who operates A&W restaurant on Clearview Drive and South Carson Street, said the city must continue to press for the freeway in order to alleviate Carson’s chronic traffic congestion. As a member of the Carson-Tahoe Hospital Board of trustees, he helped oversee its transfer from a county-owned facility to a private, nonprofit. He is paid $465 a month to serve on the board, and views the hospital as a way to stimulate community economic development.

Another community hot topic, he said it is important to “make sure Carson City continues to be available and ready to serve any new types of retail business” as it pushes for continued economic development.

IF YOU GO

What: Carson City Republican Women candidates’ forum with Assembly District 38 and Ward 3 supervisor candidates

When: 11 a.m. today

Where: Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St.

Social hour is at 11 a.m. with lunch at noon. Cost is $14. For information or reservations, call 888-2088.