Pop of antique engines to draw a crowd | NevadaAppeal.com

Pop of antique engines to draw a crowd

Maggie O'Neill
Appeal Staff Writer

Chad Lundquist/Nevada Appeal Gary Graeber, 64, sits atop his 1939 John Deere Model L tractor, at his home in Carson City. Graeber will be at the Nevada Railroad Museum all day today with his son, Jason, and other members of the Northern Nevada Antique Power Club.

It’s not because Gary Graeber has a massive lawn to mow or too much material to haul that he owns 12 tractors.

It’s simply because he likes antique-powered engines.

Graeber, a Carson City resident, will be at the Nevada Railroad Museum all day today with his son, Jason, and other members of the Northern Nevada Antique Power Club.

“The oldest (tractor) I have is a ’39 that I’m bringing and my son is bringing a ’38,” he said.

This will be the second year they display their antique power engines, and Graeber will exhibit two of his tractors and at least one engine outside the museum at 2180 S. Carson St.

“We want to continue doing it every year if we can,” Graeber said. “It’s an education. Our club feels that it’s a tool for grown-ups who have not been raised around tractors and engines, and for the younger generation coming up.”

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Graeber’s tractors come from Northern California and he’s spent time remodeling all of them – replacing parts, cleaning off grease and perfecting a sharp sound – just like a classic-car lover would do.

“I’m into cars too,” he said. “I have a 1922 Chevy I wouldn’t mind bringing down there if I had it running.”

More than 150 members are in the club, which started five years ago.

Admission to look at their antique engines is free.

“I know one gentleman who came up last year and said when he got out of the car he could hear that one-cylinder pop and that he had to come over and see it,” Graeber said.

While Graeber owns several John Deeres, trademark green, other popular tractors include Farmall tractors, trademark red, and Case Tractors, usually orange or red.

But don’t expect to see just them set up outside the museum.

Antique boats and cars may also be on hand, and Graeber has yet to decide whether to bring a 1927 upright Novo engine or a 1934 horizontal Stover.

“(Those engines) had numerous functions on the farms,” he said. “They were used for pumping water and running augers for putting corn up in the silos and that sort of thing.”