PROGRESS: Long-awaited opening of new Boys & Girls Club center | NevadaAppeal.com

PROGRESS: Long-awaited opening of new Boys & Girls Club center

Teri Vance
tvance@nevadaappeal.com

After years of planning and fundraising, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Western Nevada moved into its new $5.5 million, 12,600-square-foot center in August.

It replaced the 7,000-square-foot building on Stewart Street, which was home to the club for about 15 years.

“It’s very exciting to be in the new club,” said Bianca Alegria, 15, when the club opened on the first day of school. “We thought we’d be out of high school by the time it was done.”

It wasn’t only the location that changed.

Kyle Freitas, teen director, said there’s a greater emphasis for teens to participate in community and club service, as well as in job shadow and training programs.

“There’s going to be a lot more responsibility for them to earn privileges, like TV and video games,” he said.

Perhaps no one was more relieved than Director of Operations Diane McCoy. She was hired in 2001 to help get the club opened.

“It’s been a long time coming,” she said. “It’s so great to have it here.”

The club opened to the public for an open house on Sept. 2 to thank the more than 300 individuals, families, organizations and corporations who contributed.

“It’s been a long, hard road,” said Director Hal Hansen. “There’s been a lot of people who have helped. We can’t thank them enough.”

More than 600 children, parents, board members, leaders and community members showed up to tour the clubhouse at 1870 Russell Way, named for the Russell family, whose support helped make it a reality.

Mayor Bob Crowell served on the original board to bring the organization to Carson City more than 20 years ago.

“I’m excited to see this done,” he said. “I think this is a real milestone for Carson City. In this town, we have a lot of kids who benefit by having a place to go after school.”

And that, said Sheriff Kenny Furlong, is important.

“It puts them in a positive, caring environment that in many cases they wouldn’t have,” he said. “It keeps kids in a positive direction.”