Sam Santillo named head of Carson City School District adult education | NevadaAppeal.com

Sam Santillo named head of Carson City School District adult education

Teri Vance
tvance@nevadaappeal.com
Cathleen Allison/Nevada Appeal
NEVADA APPEAL | NEVADA APPEAL

Longtime Carson City School District administrator Sam Santillo was named director of the adult education program during Tuesday’s school board meeting.

“Mr. Santillo is a good administrator,” said Superintendent Richard Stokes. “He has good, broad experience. He’s got good people skills.”

A 1982 Carson High School graduate, Santillo spent the first nine years of his career as a teacher then served as vice principal of Eagle Valley Middle School as well as Carson Middle School.

He took over as principal of Carson Middle School in 2003. In 2007, he was named administrator of the year by the Nevada Association of School Boards.

However, he was reassigned to the district office in 2010 after pleading guilty to drunken driving.

“Mr. Santillo has done everything, to my knowledge, that was asked of him, and has had an excellent working record for us,” Stokes said. “I am confident he will do a great job as administrator of our adult education program.

Santillo said he’s ready to move forward as well.

“I’m really excited,” he said. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to work with that program.”

He will replace Fred Mariani, who retired this year after 34 years in the Carson City School District. Mariani started as a teacher at Eagle Valley Middle School in 1982, was named principal there in 2000 and took over adult education in 2006.

As the director of the program, Santillo will oversee two to four classes per night for adult students seeking a diploma or high school equivalency. The classes also serve high school students looking to make up lost credits.

He will also be in charge of the correctional education program offered in the prisons. He said 11 teachers are assigned to Warm Springs and Northern Nevada correctional centers as well as Stewart Conservation Camp.

While the age and circumstances of his students will be different, Santillo said, the basic tenents of education will remain the same.

“There really are many similarities,” he said.

“As an administrator, you’re trying to help them make connections and overcome obstacles. The only difference is you’re dealing with adult learners rather than children.”

Santillo, who has worked nearly two years as vice principal at Seeliger Elementary School, will take over the adult program on Monday.

School trustees unanimously approved Santillo’s appointment to the position.

“We’re real excited about this,” said board president Stacie Wilke.