The Popcorn Stand: What we need is Daylight Nap Time | NevadaAppeal.com

The Popcorn Stand: What we need is Daylight Nap Time

There's nothing like a good nap, so I think every day should be National Nap Day. Studies have shown a nice 10-20 minute nap in the afternoon is a good pick-me-upper. Monday was National Nap Day, although I can't figure out why.

National Nap Day falls on the first Monday after Daylight Saving Time every year, but by then I think it's too late. The idea is you lost that hour (not going to explain how you lost that hour, you know fall back, spring forward and all that), so you can at least make up for a little bit of that lost hour by taking a nap on the Monday following Daylight Saving Time.

I also will not get into whether we should even have Daylight Saving Time or Fall Standard Time or whatever it's called and why we just don't keep the time the same in the first place. I can remember as a teenager in the '70s Daylight Saving Time didn't come until the end of April, so I think we're gradually getting to the point in which we're going to do without Daylight Saving Time anyway. I do like the extra hour of sleep on a fall weekend, but I must admit like everybody else Daylight Saving Time really messes up my body clock.

Which is an argument for getting rid of Daylight Saving Time because apparently morning crashes on the road increase substantially on the Monday following Daylight Saving Time because everybody's body clocks still aren't right, yet. Daylight Saving Time lag if you will. So I'm sure the argument would be you get rid of Daylight Saving Time, you get rid of all those zombies running into each other the following Monday morning.

So back to the point I was making before I digressed, National Nap Day just comes too late. It should be National Nap weekend and it should happen throughout the entire weekend of Daylight Saving Time.

Although I did take a nice nap on Sunday afternoon and my body clock is still messed up as a write this. Time to take a nap.

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— Charles Whisnand