Tricks to finding the treasure | NevadaAppeal.com

Tricks to finding the treasure

Editor’s note: Here are the clues and their explanations for the fourth annual Nevada Day Treasure Hunt sponsored by the Nevada Appeal.

The clues and answers come from the hunt’s creator, Jesse Olson.

Robert Presswood and his family found the treasure – a 3-by-3-inch medallion – Wednesday night on the grounds of the Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson St.

Though many have been stumped by the clues, we know of more than a dozen people who hunted for the treasure on the museum grounds.

The Presswood family collected the $1,000 prize on Friday. Their story can be found in Saturday’s edition or online at nevadaappeal.com.

CLUE NO. 1

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The curtain rises

The grand stage is set

Follow the clues

And hope for the best.

Explanation: This is simply an introduction to the event.

CLUE NO. 2

East toward the barrens

It flows along a windy path.

Four out of six?

You do the math.

Explanation: The Carson River flows east through four of the six possible counties in which the treasure can be hidden. The treasure lies in one of those four counties.

CLUE NO. 3

Utopian, Pleasant, and Heavenly

Form the field

Search it well

The prize it does yield.

Explanation: On a map, Utopian Mine in Douglas County, Pleasant Valley and Heavenly Ski Resort form a triangle, which encompasses the hidden medallion.

CLUE NO. 4

Number five

Was a two-six-oh

This name helps

Direct you where to go.

Explanation: Engine No. 5 of the V&T Railroad was nicknamed “Ormsby.” The medallion is hidden in Carson City, once named Ormsby County.

CLUE NO. 5

A link that lacks connection;

A spur without a boot Ð

Find this oxymoron

And you’ll be near the loot.

Explanation: The Carson City freeway’s official number is 580. Connecting highways designated with an odd first digit do not reconnect to the parent highway, in this case, I-80. These connecting highways are called spurs.

CLUE NO. 6

Education and doctors

This major money buys

If you can nab this clue

Your chance to win will rise.

Explanation: Major Max C. Fleischmann donated money to UNR (i.e. the Fleischmann Planetarium), Carson-Tahoe Hospital – for which Fleischmann Way is named – and the Nevada State Museum. “Nab” and “rise” are hints to the source of the major’s money. He was head of Nabisco, and his father was in the yeast industry.

CLUE NO. 7

From the mountain

To the valley

Press on treasure hunters

Don’t dilly-dally.

Explanation: Mountain and Valley streets form the east and west boundaries of the playing field.

CLUE NO. 8

He was a father

One could say

For because of him

Was born a day.

Explanation: Judge Clark Guild lobbied Congress to form the first official Nevada Day. He also was instrumental in purchasing the old Carson Mint for use as a state museum.

CLUE NO. 9

Fifth is seventh

Of all fifteen.

Long is short

Search in between.

Explanation: There are 15 stoplights in Carson City. From south to north, Fifth Street is the seventh signal. Long Street narrows the search area to between Fifth and Long streets. Note, that at the time of this clue was printed, the signal at Medical Parkway had not been activated.

CLUE NO. 10

It’s a duke, a saint

And a wrinkle in time.

It bypasses 60

And answers this rhyme.

Explanation: The Blue Line Tour winds past 60 homes in west Carson, including the house used in the filming of ‘The Shootist,’ St. Teresa’s, the St. Charles and the Rinkel Mansion. The Nevada State Museum is also on the tour.

CLUE NO. 11

Hunters paid

To mine this place

Tripled their money

At a meager pace.

Explanation: Once, placer miners paid $600 to placer mine the grounds of the Carson Mint. After six months, they made a profit of $1,800.

CLUE NO. 12

Five names converge

Near the spot

Where the treasure lies

You’re getting hot.

Explanation: A plaque on the corner stone of the Museum commemorates Gov. Carville, Judge Clark Guild, Max C. Fleischmann, Donavan and Pike for helping the create the museum.

CLUE NO. 13

Change is inevitable

So it’s nice to have known

That some things are

Set in stone.

Explanation: The medallion was hidden under a stone on the grounds of the museum. “Change” was a reference to the Mint.

CLUE NO. 14

Feeling bushed?

Feeling beat?

Weary hunters

Have a seat.

Explanation: The grounds near the hidden medallion include a depiction of the state and its county ‘seats.’ The treasure was also hidden near the ‘bushes.’